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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
3 times now, after my 2014 Indian Chief Vintage has been parked in a parking lot or driveway for an hour, when I come back and take off slowly before I enter the street, my front brake lever is locked out solid. So solid I cannot move it at all. Like is was welded.
I think it is the ABS. maybe.
The first two times..... once I pulled in the clutch in time but lost my balance and the bike tipped over gently. The front brake lever returned to normal. Once the bike stopped totally and killed the engine before I could pull in the clutch. Last time I was more prepared and stomped the foot pedal, it was really hard to kick down and I heard the ABS clunk. Speed was 2-3 miles an hour all 3 times and ABS lite had not gone out yet.

Anyone else have this happen?

Just today I added some leather grips to the levers, and saw the tiny return spring on my front brake lever was MISSING. Luckily the leather kit comes another spring and a special thumbwheel to adjust for the leather spacing on the grips. Dont' think it was the spring because it has probably been gone for some time.

Thanks in advance for any ideas. Taking it to the shop soonest. 3 times is not a coincidence. No warranty any more.
 

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I'd trailer that sucker to the dealer immediately.
 

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How's the fluid level in the reservoir??? You should atleast see a bubble in the top of the site glass when the machine is level.If it is too full,then there is no room for expansion,hence it can and will create a problem like you're describing.
 

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I've had that happen a couple of times. The first time it happened it scared the $hit out of me. The second time it happened it only scared the $not out of me. The third time it happened it went to the dealer. The dealer could find nothing, except the ABS sensor on the rear wheel was full of brake dust and grit. That was cleaned off and have been problem free since then. Hope that helps. It was my exact problem, just as you stated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've had that happen a couple of times. The first time it happened it scared the $hit out of me. The second time it happened it only scared the $not out of me. The third time it happened it went to the dealer. The dealer could find nothing, except the ABS sensor on the rear wheel was full of brake dust and grit. That was cleaned off and have been problem free since then. Hope that helps. It was my exact problem, just as you stated.
Thank you, glad it wasn't just me. I'll clean that puppy out right now. Had the sensors replaced last year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've had that happen a couple of times. The first time it happened it scared the $hit out of me. The second time it happened it only scared the $not out of me. The third time it happened it went to the dealer. The dealer could find nothing, except the ABS sensor on the rear wheel was full of brake dust and grit. That was cleaned off and have been problem free since then. Hope that helps. It was my exact problem, just as you stated.
How's the fluid level in the reservoir??? You should atleast see a bubble in the top of the site glass when the machine is level.If it is too full,then there is no room for expansion,hence it can and will create a problem like you're describing.
Fluid level is good. I flushed and replaced it after the first time it happened.
 

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Fluid level is good. I flushed and replaced it after the first time it happened.
Usually low fluid makes it feel squishy, not hard.

Be curious if cleaning out the sensors does the trick. Looking forward to your report.
 

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NO!! Air in the hydraulic system is what makes the brakes mushy or squishy, as you call it.
Which usually happens when you let your brake fluid get too low.
 

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As the mechanic explained it to me, if the ABS brain cannot read the sensor it assumes the rear brake is locked up, and will prevent the front brake from operating, hence, creating a 2 wheel lockup. Cleaning the sensor allows the ABS brain to properly monitor the system again. Fluid level has nothing to do with the problem. Once they cleaned my rear sensor the problem seemed to be solved.
 

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As the mechanic explained it to me, if the ABS brain cannot read the sensor it assumes the rear brake is locked up, and will prevent the front brake from operating, hence, creating a 2 wheel lockup. Cleaning the sensor allows the ABS brain to properly monitor the system again. Fluid level has nothing to do with the problem. Once they cleaned my rear sensor the problem seemed to be solved.
My original point--didn't sound like a fluid issue.

My question is should some kind of routine cleaning be done to make sure a braking issue doesn't occur? Judging from the responses to this thread, it seems like it's a problem that has occurred more than once. Should we be wiping down our ABS sensors every six months or every few thousand miles? And if so, what is the procedure?
 

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My original point--didn't sound like a fluid issue.

My question is should some kind of routine cleaning be done to make sure a braking issue doesn't occur? Judging from the responses to this thread, it seems like it's a problem that has occurred more than once. Should we be wiping down our ABS sensors every six months or every few thousand miles? And if so, what is the procedure?
I second this request. Any have a picture of the sensor? Is it easily accessible and easy to clean?
 

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My original point--didn't sound like a fluid issue.

My question is should some kind of routine cleaning be done to make sure a braking issue doesn't occur? Judging from the responses to this thread, it seems like it's a problem that has occurred more than once. Should we be wiping down our ABS sensors every six months or every few thousand miles? And if so, what is the procedure?
I would assume that the pressure from a spray nozzle would sufficiently clean the sensor. My bike is a Dark Horse, and my bike washing skills are somewhat lapse, due to the matte finish. I now make sure I hit the rotors and calipers good with the spray nozzle to knock off all the dust, front and rear.
 

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The manual says that ABS isn't activated until you go over 6 MPH (while ABS is illuminated) . ABS should be activated when first starting out.
 

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I would assume that the pressure from a spray nozzle would sufficiently clean the sensor. My bike is a Dark Horse, and my bike washing skills are somewhat lapse, due to the matte finish. I now make sure I hit the rotors and calipers good with the spray nozzle to knock off all the dust, front and rear.
I hate to get any more water than necessary around the fenders--I'm afraid they'll rust. I very rarely ride in the rain, it doesn't rain much here.

But that's another issue for another thread.
 

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I hate to get any more water than necessary around the fenders--I'm afraid they'll rust. I very rarely ride in the rain, it doesn't rain much here.

But that's another issue for another thread.
Maybe compressed air would work. The mechanic used that, but suggested water, maybe to avoid breathing in brake dust.
 
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