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Discussion Starter #1
This is not the first bike I've owned that didn't have a center stand!
Of course a center stand always makes repairs and oil changes and tire changes much easier.

This is a picture of my center stand substitute under my 2010 Honda Bobber.
Phantom Bob 013-2.jpg
It is adjustable for height to raise bike. I'm hoping that it will work quite fine for my Scout!

Motorcycle Cruiser Adjustable Center Stand Lift Jack Display Hoist Harley BMW | eBay
 

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Haven't tested my J&S Jack to see if will work on the Scout yet, but if it doesn't will be the First Bike it wouldn't work on ..
 

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Haven't tested my J&S Jack to see if will work on the Scout yet, but if it doesn't will be the First Bike it wouldn't work on ..
I have the jack stand that lifts the bike about three feet. It worked for the Electra, VTX 1800, so I am hoping it works with the Vintage. I getting to old to bend over to work/clean bike. I do applaud the idea, I have not had a center since my 1975 Honda 350
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The stand that I showed is only a substitute for a center stand, it only lifts the rear tire like a center stand would and most importantly holds the bike level like a center stand.

Think checking oil levels or tire pressure or adjustments to drive chains or belts!

It is not meant to replace the use or convenience of a good motorcycle lift for other service work.

My motorcycle lift would be a whole other thread! LOL!
 

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I cut this warning right out of the Indian Scout owners manual. I would not use the type of lift pictured on an Indian Scout. This lift states right in the link that it is to be used on motorcycles with exposed lower frame rails. The Scout has no lower frame rails. You are lifting right on the engine case. This certainly far exceeds the minimum 12 x 12 surface recommended.

Elevating the Motorcycle
WARNING!
Serious injury or death can occur if the motorcycle tips
or falls. Make sure the motorcycle will not tip or fall while elevated or
while on the sidestand.

Some procedures require raising the motorcycle to remove
weight from the component being inspected. Elevate the
motorcycle by placing a stable, flat platform jack or lift
mechanism on a firm, flat surface and lifting under the
engine crankcase. The platform should be a minimum of 12
inches (30 cm) square. DO NOT attempt to lift the
motorcycle without proper equipment. Always secure the
motorcycle properly before lifting so it cannot tip or fall
when elevated.
 

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One problem I see with that center stand is that it is only rated to 800 lbs. I'd sure hate for it to collapse and dump my bike.
 

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This is not the first bike I've owned that didn't have a center stand!
Of course a center stand always makes repairs and oil changes and tire changes much easier.

This is a picture of my center stand substitute under my 2010 Honda Bobber.
View attachment 4154
It is adjustable for height to raise bike. I'm hoping that it will work quite fine for my Scout!

Motorcycle Cruiser Adjustable Center Stand Lift Jack Display Hoist Harley BMW | eBay
Looks interesting. Keep us informed.
 

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I cut this warning right out of the Indian Scout owners manual. I would not use the type of lift pictured on an Indian Scout. This lift states right in the link that it is to be used on motorcycles with exposed lower frame rails. The Scout has no lower frame rails. You are lifting right on the engine case. This certainly far exceeds the minimum 12 x 12 surface recommended.

Elevating the Motorcycle
WARNING!
Serious injury or death can occur if the motorcycle tips
or falls. Make sure the motorcycle will not tip or fall while elevated or
while on the sidestand.

Some procedures require raising the motorcycle to remove
weight from the component being inspected. Elevate the
motorcycle by placing a stable, flat platform jack or lift
mechanism on a firm, flat surface and lifting under the
engine crankcase. The platform should be a minimum of 12
inches (30 cm) square. DO NOT attempt to lift the
motorcycle without proper equipment. Always secure the
motorcycle properly before lifting so it cannot tip or fall
when elevated.
Serious injury or death? You'd have to try awful damn hard to figure out a way to die just cause your bike tipped over. Cripes. I woulda been triple dead and gone many years back.

Lawyers. What a riot.
 

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I cut this warning right out of the Indian Scout owners manual. I would not use the type of lift pictured on an Indian Scout. This lift states right in the link that it is to be used on motorcycles with exposed lower frame rails. The Scout has no lower frame rails. You are lifting right on the engine case. This certainly far exceeds the minimum 12 x 12 surface recommended.

Elevating the Motorcycle
WARNING!
Serious injury or death can occur if the motorcycle tips
or falls. Make sure the motorcycle will not tip or fall while elevated or
while on the sidestand.

Some procedures require raising the motorcycle to remove
weight from the component being inspected. Elevate the
motorcycle by placing a stable, flat platform jack or lift
mechanism on a firm, flat surface and lifting under the
engine crankcase. The platform should be a minimum of 12
inches (30 cm) square. DO NOT attempt to lift the
motorcycle without proper equipment. Always secure the
motorcycle properly before lifting so it cannot tip or fall
when elevated.
My Victory Cross Country Manual says exactly the same thing word for word also an Aluminum Frame Bike that weights at 1 1/2 times what the Scout does .. My J&S Jack handles it just fine ..

 

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Discussion Starter #11
cut this warning right out of the Indian Scout owners manual. I would not use the type of lift pictured on an Indian Scout. This lift states right in the link that it is to be used on motorcycles with exposed lower frame rails. The Scout has no lower frame rails. You are lifting right on the engine case. This certainly far exceeds the minimum 12 x 12 surface recommended.
I'm sure that some lawyer thought this through very carefully to protect us all from ourselves, but I don't think that raising the rear wheel 3 inches off the ground will hurt the crankcase on the scout.

I have used it directly on the case of my Scout already and would have no fear of doing it again.

It is not like I'm trying to raise the entire weight of the bike off the ground balancing it delicately on a knife edge against the oil sump!


The roller bar is steel protected by a cushioning black Nylon (?) tube on the outside of the bar
It rolls like a roller bearing against the surface it contacts under the bike while raising the rear wheel.
All in all a VERY stable and safe substitute for a bike without a center stand.

I'm sure if you could see one in actual use you would approve of it's safe and stable use as intended! <G>

Of course my disclaimer: Any tool can be abused and can damage whatever it is being used on.
In most cases this is NOT usually the fault of the tool, but of the operator, and should be kept in mind if you feel like you are incompetent and can't operate the tools in an efficient manner!


 

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Discussion Starter #12
One problem I see with that center stand is that it is only rated to 800 lbs. I'd sure hate for it to collapse and dump my bike.
I gave you a winning star for your stinging satirical remark!
big grin.GIF
 

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This looks like a doable lift. The way it works would probably enable a surface of some size to be attached to the roller so the contact area would be larger. This no doubt would go against the manufacturers statement that the lift shouldn't me modified to avoid the possibility of dropping a Scout 3 inches.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The way it works would probably enable a surface of some size to be attached to the roller so the contact area would be larger. This no doubt would go against the manufacturers statement that the lift shouldn't me modified to avoid the possibility of dropping a Scout 3 inches.:cool:
I have used this lift for several years on an customised ST-1100, Honda Super Hawk, Honda Phantom and a Triumph Storm and now the Scout!
I love the use of it, simple and as easy to use as an anvil! LOL!
 

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Well now, I followed RBin TEX's excellent advice for a center stand replacement and got myself one of these off Ebay. However, I also would like to have a stand that lifts the bike 30 inch's or so & rolls around on retactable wheels. The price for these stands is steep however.... Harbor Freight has one that lists for $699, now on sale for $429. Better, But WAIT..... there's more! As the ad huckster stays on TV. If you pick up the Jan/Feb 2015 copy of Motorcycle Classics, on page 66 is a Harbor Freight ad coupon listing the same lift for only $319.99. I drove down to check it out, because as we all know, Harbor Freight has as much junk as they have decent wares. Upon inspection, it appears quiet robust, certainly enough to hand a sub-600lb machine. And... that 52% discount is worth considering.














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Well now, I followed RBin TEX's excellent advice for a center stand replacement and got myself one of these off Ebay. However, I also would like to have a stand that lifts the bike 30 inch's or so & rolls around on retactable wheels. The price for these stands is steep however.... Harbor Freight has one that lists for $699, now on sale for $429. Better, But WAIT..... there's more! As the ad huckster stays on TV. If you pick up the Jan/Feb 2015 copy of Motorcycle Classics, on page 66 is a Harbor Freight ad coupon listing the same lift for only $319.99. I drove down to check it out, because as we all know, Harbor Freight has as much junk as they have decent wares. Upon inspection, it appears quiet robust, certainly enough to hand a sub-600lb machine. And... that 52% discount is worth considering.
We are a Fast Track members of HF, so there is absolutely no hate or snobbish attitude here. We buy stuff there all the time. However, not a lift to hoist $100k+ worth of bikes. Search beyond this forum and study the pros and cons of it, as well as alternatives, real-life experiences. There is an ongoing debate at Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum for example.

How we use it might be different from how others do. Multiple bikes, significant amount of wrenching, and no space constraints. We often use the lift with a scissor jack or paddock stand. None of our bikes is heavy (although there is a Chief on the way, rumor has it), but we do things that test the stability (removing rear wheel, for example).

Just sayin...
 

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I hear what you are saying. Still, I am not using it in a commerical setting, just with the one Scout, so for me at least, I think it's doable. I have previously checked out other solutions and they are still pricey, J&S for example. $399 for the lift then...$129 for a Scout attachment. Others, have stated that aren't sure about their lifts due to the engine as a frame member construction. As they say in your neck of the woods, " this isn't my first rodeo", what this being (when it actually arrives ) bike No. 38 in a line going back 53 years. So I come to the table with eyes open. Now if I had a number of bikes to work on, I could amorize the cost of one of those nice air acuated lift tables, but for the casual user, the HF unit is something to consider. I hasten to add... if you have suggestion about particular models that fall into the sub $400 price range... I am all ears.
 

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I hear what you are saying. Still, I am not using it in a commerical setting, just with the one Scout, so for me at least, I think it's doable. I have previously checked out other solutions and they are still pricey, J&S for example. $399 for the lift then...$129 for a Scout attachment. Others, have stated that aren't sure about their lifts do to the engine as a frame member construction. As they say in your neck of the woods, " this isn't my first rodeo", what this being (when it actually arrives ) bike No. 38 in a line
going back 53 years. So I come to the table with eyes open. Now if I had a number of bikes to work on, I could amorize the cost of one of those nice air acuated lift tables, but for the casual user, the HF unit is something to consider. I hasten to add... if you have suggestion about particular models that fall into the sub $400 price range... I am all ears.
Said with respect, you got a lot more experience than I do. Nothing to add...
 

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Hey Ronnie, Sorry to get off topic, but that Honda is cool as hell. Did you keep it?
 

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Ha Meggie! My experience maybe long but... most of the bikes I worked on are now museum pieces. Try finding an Ariel, Brough Superior, Norton, BSA, Mustang ( A Texas bike!) Cushman Eagle or Vincent dealer in the yellow pages! If you can adjust those Desmodromic Valves on your Ducati's, you have my unbridled respect. That is also the one maintenance item I dread doing on the Scout, as it requires removing the cams & matching an appropriate thickness tappet to adjust the valve lash. It shapes up to be a several days job as there are 8 valves & 36 different tappet thicknesses. So unless you have the appropriate tappets on hand....it's off to the dealer one goes.
 
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