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Any current or former MSF instructors out there? Your input would be appreciated.

I’m thinking of becoming a MSF Instructor.

Previously, I worked several years for a major satellite TV company training/coaching new employees how to install and service the equipment. So, I have a bit of experience coaching adults. I experienced the good and the bad and I’m happy to say the good far outweighed the bad

The only info I have is the instructors course is taught over 4 weekends and their looks like a shortage of instructors in my area - maybe everywhere

What additional info can you give? Specifically: How much do you spend prepping for each class? Do you share in the maintenance of the bikes? How much paperwork is there for each class? For every hour in class, how much time is spent prepping and/or cleaning up?

Thanks
 

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I was certified in 2016. My class was two weeks long. We began with essentially taking the BRC, and had to score above 80% on the written, IIRC, so it would behoove you to study. Once that was done, we were taught how to actually instruct the lessons in the classroom, with each student having to teach a section to the other students, and you get graded on that. Once the classroom portion is done, you get instructed on how to run a range, how to break down the exercises, and how to grade the final test. At the end of the two weeks, you have to actually teach a course.

So far as pre-and post-classroom tasks, you generally have to be there early enough to set up the classroom (if you are using one...the BRC2, for example, is all range exercises) and sweep the range of debris that may have accumulated overnight. Say, and hour or so. Post-class cleanup goes a little faster. Maintaining the bikes depends on the company that you are contracting through. I taught on base for the Army, so we only did BRC2 and ARC. The students rode their own bikes. I had the opportunity to work for a couple of the local colleges that offered the course, but I was on night shift and could not pursue. If you work for a company that provides the 250cc bikes for the BRC, then you may have to spend time assisting in maintenance.

There is a liability waiver for each student, and the written course materials (student handbooks, handouts, the test, etc). Whomever manages the training site should be able to obtain the Course Cards that are handed out at the completion of the course.
 

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I highly recommend becoming an instructor if you’re at all interested. I had the privilege of teaching for the State of Oregon’s motorcycle safety program (Team Oregon) for 10 years...the most professional organization I’ve ever been affiliated with, as well as a company in Colorado (private company, state oversight) for 2 years when we moved here in 2011.

In both cases motorcycle maintenance was minimal as there was a dedicated maintenance tech to handle anything major. All I ever had to do was an occasional clutch adjustment, replace a broken lever if someone dropped a bike, and wipe the bike nameplates and refuel them all when the class was completed.

Each class had a lead instructor who taught both classroom and riding, as well as a “range only” instructor who just taught the riding portions with the lead instructor. The classroom instructor had the primary responsibility of taking care of the paperwork (class roster and overall scores, waivers, written test sheets, riding evaluation score sheet, class surveys, and ratings for each student), and getting that turned in at the completion of the class.

When I taught ”lead,” I would try to be there an hour early to get the classroom and AV needs set up, as well as any administrative tasks done before students started arriving. When I taught range only, I would get there early enough to make sure the range was clean and give me enough time to pull all the bikes out and line them up, unless I was teaching an afternoon class as the morning crew would already have that done.

As far as prep time before each class, I would study the classroom material the week prior to each class, as well as read my range cards a few times as there is a lot of things going on, things to watch for, and exercise transitions to be prepared for. I would also make sure I read the riding evaluation portion of my range cards and in the policy manual the night before the eval so everything was fresh in my mind and the students got the fairest and most accurate scoring possible.

I was certified in the MSF MRC:RSS, then Team Oregon’s own curriculum, and finally the MSF BRC when I moved to Colorado, but I don't know anything about their (MSF) newest program and how it relates to what I taught. Team Oregon has gone to an online classroom in the last several years, not sure if that’s what the MSF is doing now.

Again, I highly recommend it. It will stretch you in many ways, help you relate to and understand people better, and make you a better rider in the process. It was the best “job" I ever had in my life, but I never saw it as a job. I saw it as sharing something I love (riding) while contributing to the safety of my riding brothers and sisters. And I consider myself blessed to have had the opportunity.
 

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Here's alittle story you guys might enjoy regarding these MSF courses!:

A few years ago,while out riding on a hot Saturday afternoon,I pulled over on the side of the road to have a drink of the soda I had in my saddlebag,when I noticed a MC training class going on in a vacant parking lot about 50 feet away from where I had stopped.There were ten students mounted on small 250CC bikes and a female instructor.She had a little course laid out in the parking lot with orange cones marked with different things like STOP,Slow,Right turn only,etc.Anyways,while her students were going thru that course practicing,she noticed me and came over to chat with me.In the meantime,her students were going thru the course she had laid out for them with the orange cones.Everything was going well,until the students came to a cone marked STOP,which all of the riders did "EXCEPT" for the last bike in line because he wasn't paying attention to the bikes in front of him,instead,he was looking at me and the instructor talking about 50 feet away.Guess what happened next?? Give up?? lol lol The gentleman riding that last bike in line played Dominoes,lol,"meaning" he hit the bike in front of him [ cause he wasn't paying attention] and they all went down like dominoes.lol lol Actually,it wasn't funny at all,but it was.lol The good news was,no one was injured.But when it happened,well,I won't repeat the words that came out of that lady instructors' mouth,but they weren,'t very nice!! lol lol Anyways,she ran back over there to see if anyone was injured [no one was] then proceeded to yell at that last guy in line with words I can't repeatt,lol lol for his aaaaaaaaaaaaaa ERROR!! lol lol lol Anyways,that kinda made my day.Thought you guys might like that story!
:):)
 

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Davetac1, were truckers pulling off the road to write down what she was saying? A new level of swearing?

When I was in school for my CDL, I was joking with the instructor about when we were having the class to learn how to swear "like a trucker". He said I was going to be the "Student Teacher" for that, and I replied, "What the f*ck are you talking about?"
 

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All I can tell ya for sure is,she was NOT a happy camper!! lol lol But since I'm the fine gentleman that I am :rolleyes: and would NEVER use language like that [perish the thought :rolleyes: ] I can't repeat it!!:rolleyes::rolleyes::):ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 
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