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I apologize if this is listed somewhere else and feel free to tell me to pound sand(provide link). I've never used mid-rise bars I am considering it with all my buddies using them on their bikes. What is the advantage to switching it up? Looking at the KST's. Thanks in advance
 

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The KST are very nice. I have Torch and a friend FMB. Another friend has KST and we all feel his are most comfortable.
The advantage is better bike control, especially riding slow and tight turning, like in parking lots, and more comfort for most of us. With my hands in line with your shoulders I sit up straighter, instead of slouching.
 

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I just added 2" risers to my stock handlebars, ive been suffering from neck/shoulder pain, and for low speed handling. If i need more, I may go with the 4" or 6" rise bars. i probably wont know until next spring. It takes a 200 mile ride to start the neck/shoulder-blade strain. Our riding season is quickly ending here in Michigan, getting cold mornings already.
 

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You added risers to a Challenger? How were you able to install without conflicting with the touch screen? If you could walk me through and post photos, it would be appreciated.
 

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My guess is he responded to a post from the new posts page without knowing this was posted in the Challenger section. According to his profile, he's got a 17' RoadMaster.
 

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Ah. . . likely so . . . hope springs eternal that I could get that extra 2-inches of rearward relocation through risers (i.e., without having to switch to a reduced reach option and then powder coat them black).
 

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I would disagree with some of the above posts. You’re not going to control your bike better with your hands higher. I’ve been on mountain twisties with guys that had raised bars and they struggled to keep up. Ask yourself this...if raising your hands made a bike easier to control, wouldn’t sport bike‘s use them? There’s a reason sport bikes use narrow, low handlebars. The only advantage I see to hi rise bars is if you have shoulder problems and you find raising your hands to shoulder height offers more comfort. It’s just a fad.
 

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I agree with that mostly. The only exception I would see to it is for low speed handling-- the stock bars are pulled very far back from the pivot point of the triple, so hand movements lock to lock are far more exaggerated. With higher rise bars if the grips are closer to the center of the pivot point it would reduce this and give the rider the impression that handling is easier.

That being said, I totally agree that high bars are a fad. The silly "punching the air" look isn't for me.
 

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I would disagree with some of the above posts. You’re not going to control your bike better with your hands higher. I’ve been on mountain twisties with guys that had raised bars and they struggled to keep up. Ask yourself this...if raising your hands made a bike easier to control, wouldn’t sport bike‘s use them? There’s a reason sport bikes use narrow, low handlebars. The only advantage I see to hi rise bars is if you have shoulder problems and you find raising your hands to shoulder height offers more comfort. It’s just a fad.
I have far more control with my hands at shoulder height then I ever did with them at my hips.

Tell that to this guy, his bars are shoulder high, perfect for maneuvering like this...

 

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Hmm, yeah IDK. That video is a great example of how having your grips closer to the pivot point reduces the amount of movement needed to steer at low speed and not any evidence that the height was what helped.
 
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