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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any recommendations on whether I should have both front and rear tires the same brand?

My front stock Kendra is worn out my 2018 Indian Scout Sixty. Given the grip, good reviews, and Indian’s choice to back Pirelli Night Dragons, I want to start using those. (I value performance longevity...but not enough to go with Avon’s).

I have good tread on the rear American Elite either 2nd or 3rd gen), so no need to change that unless it would provide either (a) a safer ride, or (b) a better ride.

So, what do you think: should I simply get the new Pirelli Night Dragon for the front, or swap out both tires for a matching set?
 

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I've run different brands on bikes in the past with no trouble.

On my Kawasaki Versys I typically change the rear once by itself, then front and rear together. If I can't get the same brand I get something close to it, and the next changeover they will both be the same again.

On the Springfield I changed the rear to a Night Dragon a long time before the front needed changing, so I had Dunlop until it needed changing and I went to Night Dragon. Once again, that didn't cause me any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thank you for the feedback. I ended up getting a matching pair of Dunlop American Elite 4's. They seem to give similar performance and longevity as the Night Dragon's, but also seem more geared towards a rider like me, who rarely scrapes their pegs.
 

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Make sure the different brands aren't of different construction, i.e bias and radial. You shouldn't mix these.
You may want to rethink that advice. The Challenger comes, out of the box, with a bias front tire and a radial rear tire.
 

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Mixing brands of tires on a bike is fine. It's been done for many years, especially by racers who will pick individual tires that give the traction and handling characteristics that they need at any given track or riding conditions. Of course, you won't see it if a racer is sponsored by a certain brand.
As for mixing bias & radial construction, it's also been done over the years on the track and the street, for similar reasons. In fact, the Thunderstroke series comes off the showroom floor with both bias & radial tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’ve read that radial rear, bias front can be a good mix, but that a radial front and bias rear would be terrible & dangerous.
 

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I’ve read that radial rear, bias front can be a good mix, but that a radial front and bias rear would be terrible & dangerous.
I've also heard and read the same over the years which is why I brought it up in an earlier post. Some say it's best not to mix them at all.
 

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Mixed tires would look like you got your bike from a Buy Here, Pay Here, keep them the same. I had went with the Michelin Commander II front and rear on a 2017 Scout 60 that I used to have, before my Springfield, they worked great.
 

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When bias and radial tires are used on the same bike, the front is typically the bias type. That's because radial tires have sidewalls that flex more readily and the stiffer sidewalls of bias tires gives quicker, more responsive steering. The more flexible bias tires serve to give the rear a broader contact patch that conforms better to the road surface, thereby better traction at the back.
 
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