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Hey guys, I decided to start doing my own service on my 17 Springfield since it’s out of warranty and the dealer prices are, IMO, a bit outrageous. Anyway, I performed a compression test on the cylinders according to the service manual and both my cylinders only hit about 70 psi. Manual says should be anywhere between 90-110. I’m doing the 10,000 mile service, I have about 11,000 miles on it and I’ve been to the dealer for the 500 and 5000 mile service and this bike has never given me any problems and is currently running beautifully! Not sure if my gauge is off or what but I would think if the compression was really that low it would be running badly. I may bring it to the dealership and have them do just the comp test, but wasn’t sure if any of you have any thoughts on it.
Thanks in advance
C
 

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Borrow another guage from someone like Auto Zone and rerun the cylinders.
Save your money at the dealer for something you want.
 

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Check with a known good gauge, make sure you have a fully charged battery and test is done with throttle fully open
You can see if the results are the same as 1st test different.
If the same you could do a wet test which is a little cap of oil down cylinder and repeat compression test and record results which would indicate worn ring or cylinder
You can also do a hot engine compression test and check results
Or best test to do is a leak down test - this will give a far better idea of engine condition
 

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Hey guys, I decided to start doing my own service on my 17 Springfield since it’s out of warranty and the dealer prices are, IMO, a bit outrageous. Anyway, I performed a compression test on the cylinders according to the service manual and both my cylinders only hit about 70 psi. Manual says should be anywhere between 90-110. I’m doing the 10,000 mile service, I have about 11,000 miles on it and I’ve been to the dealer for the 500 and 5000 mile service and this bike has never given me any problems and is currently running beautifully! Not sure if my gauge is off or what but I would think if the compression was really that low it would be running badly. I may bring it to the dealership and have them do just the comp test, but wasn’t sure if any of you have any thoughts on it.
Thanks in advance
C
Where you pressurizing the cylinder or cranking the engine over? Not sure how to get an accurate reading when cranking the engine over since we have the S and S style compression release devices on our cams. Also don't test a cold air cooled engine. Get it up to temp before checking.

Honestly never saw a need to do the compression check. Pretty sure I would be able to feel a loss of power or something not right on my bike to warrant me digging into it. Currently at 47K and running strong. Dean
 

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Sometimes too much "knowledge" is a bad thing. I don't try to find things to worry about on my bike, It (actually both of them() have been tanks when it comes to the engine., If you had compression that low -- highly unlikely -- you would be burning some oil or seeing a degradation in performance My guess is that the compression release valve is giving you a false reading. Forgettaboutit.
 

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I have to agree that if you really had 70 PSI your bike would run like crap. The dealers rarely do a comp test if the test ride indicates a decent running engine. It is really a diagnostic tool for a bad or non-running engine. If it really bothers you have someone else do it with a different gage. I wouldn't lose any sleep over it!
 

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Due to the fact that Polaris requires a compression test at the 500-mile service some folks might get the idea that it is a routine requirement in general. At the 500-mile service, they want to ensure the engine break-in has gone according to nominal standards and there are no developing conditions that will cause premature failure. Past that milestone, engine should be pretty dependable and trustworthy. I agree that your testing equipment and methodology may be producing erroneous results. The leak-down diagnostic is superior in many ways... to be used specifically when you experience other symptoms of engine degradation and want to know what is failing inside without a tear-down.
 

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The standard compression in the Indian manual is low due to the effect the compression releases have on compression. 90 to 110 lb compression is indicative that the compression releases are working! If this engine was not fitted with compression releases no doubt compression would be 180 lb or more. Since these engines are ride by wire opening the throttle grip does not open the throttle blade in the throttle body during cranking.
RACNRAY
 
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The default position for the compression release is that it is activated and releasing pressure. Once the engine is actually running (past the engine starting RPM) the speed of the rotating cams causes an arm to swing away and the nub that lifts the pushrod (releasing the compression) is moved to the deactivated position.

(I just have to say, I read the patent on this compression release design and it is the tightest, tidiest solution I have ever seen. Very nicely done).

The only way (that I can see) to actually test the running compression would be to remove a sparkplug and tape it to ground so the ECU stays happy, then use a compression gauge with a screw in compression fitting (not the rubber nub type you hold against the spark plug hole).

Then tape the actual gauge down somewhere so that it doesn't move and then tape down a cell phone such that it will video the gauge and then crank the engine and let it run for a few seconds.

As soon as it started running you would see the actual compression on the gauge and have a nice video record of it.

Since the new bikes shut off the rear cylinder when needed you won’t bother anything for the few seconds it is running on 1 cylinder (as long as you do not leave the sparkplug ungrounded, the system needs the circuit to be able to find ground).

Rinse and repeat for the other cylinder.

HTH.
 
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