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Discussion Starter #1
Sadly I will be away overseas for at least 6 months so the bike will be stuck in the garage that whole time. I have the battery tender hooked up and have the tires inflated to the max. Any other suggestions? Is it ok to leave it on the kick stand?
 

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There are a few things to do but opinions have varied over time on how useful they are - a bit like oil threads. :)

Change the oil before you leave. Used oil has degraded a certain amount and absorbed combustion byproducts and when left sitting in the motor can corrode things. When you get back and start riding, change it to fresh oil again.

Don't fill the fuel tank, and use a fuel conditioner designed for storage. If fuel sits too long some of the components can separate out and form a varnish that gums up injectors etc. The conditioner keeps that under control.

Some people don't like leaving the tires sitting on concrete for extended periods like this and they put a sheet of plywood or plastic or something under the tires. They worry that the highly alkaline nature of concrete slowly degrades the rubber.

Keep some rat/mouse bait around if they are likely to be a problem. You don't want to come back to chewed wires etc.

Battery tenders have changed a bit over the years and most newer ones have a float cycle that keeps the battery at optimum charge. I've got a second bike I don't ride much and it sits on such a tender for months at a time without worry. Older tenders that feed a continual charge can degrade the battery. Check what the features of your particular tender are to see if it can be left on or needs a timer as Max has suggested.

Sitting on the kickstand won't be a problem.
 

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Don't fill the fuel tank, and use a fuel conditioner designed for storage.
To the brim please after you added conditioner. This means less air to draw water from, and more fuel to absorb the water it still pulls from the air. Ideally all the way into the neck of the fuel tank, so the fuel surface is nice and small.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is the battery tender I have which does have the float mode. Do I still need the timer?

Features & Benefits
The Battery Tender® junior is lightweight, compact, and fully automatic; very easy to use, especially in small spaces. Output = 12 V and 0.750 A.
  • Perfect for all lead-acid, flooded or sealed maintenance free batteries (AGM and Gel Cel).
  • Complete 4-step charging program (Initialization, bulk charge, absorption mode, float mode).
  • Automatically switches to float / maintenance voltage after fully charging the battery.
  • If the battery voltage drops too far under load, full charger output power resumes.
  • Solid state two color LED indicates operating state of charger.
  • Spark proof.
 

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I wouldn't trust any float charger for six month connected. Seen too many batteries from friends dead after a full winter on a float charger. You'd even better disconnect the battery terminals so there is no draw at all from any component. Then a trickle charge every month or two could even be enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Going for the oil change as well I have something like 3600 on the bike now. Got the OEM FTR oil kit. Does the kit require anything else? Or does it have everything you need? I have all the other oil change tools necessary.
 

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It comes with new crush washers, nothing else needed. Indian has a good video on the site that walks you through the process. Super easy.

One caution, the kit comes with 4 quarts but you will only need 3. The site glass doesn't fill as you put the oil in. The video says to put in 3 quarts, start the engine, run for I think 2 minutes, shut it off, let it settle, then check.

Sorry to hear you will be gone for so long, I wish you luck!
 

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I don't do anything ,I don't trust anything plugged in for any amount of time unattended.have a 49 hd that sets for a few years at a time,a semi truck that sets for a couple of years at a time.and my Indian that I set the clock in spring,charge the battery and go.
 

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If you don’t have stands. Make sure there are squares of carpet or mat under the tires, not on the bare concrete. I would remove the battery from the bike, put it in your house.

And add fuel stabilizer to a full tank of fuel, let the bike run for a little.




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Being from Northern Canada, my bike sits for 6 months every year. (October to May)

Change the oil, plug in a battery tender, fuel stabalizer (and let run for a few minutes).

Good to go.

--
Gordon
 

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fixdent is correct on all counts. Stored that way (maybe with a little more Sta-bil for long term storage as per their directions) and the bike would be good for two years.

Battery Tender brand charger would keep a new battery good for the life of the battery, even better than running it every day.

I would put stands under both ends to keep the wheels off the ground if I was storing it that long though.
 

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1oz per 2.5 gallons.
Make sure you run the engine for a brief period after you add the fuel stabilizer, this will keep the whole fuel system from gumming up. I stored an HD Fatboy for several Winters in the side stand and no battery tender. Started right up in spring. Stay safe!
 
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