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Hey looking to start gathering parts and tools to tackle installing new hi performance valve springs for my 17 Chieftain Limited. Anyone try LLoydz valve spring compressor tool and/or the air compressor spark plug adapter tool?
 

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asking myself the same question

but a few DIY warnings come to mind:
1) the spring compressor gets threaded to a aluminium head ( don't strip the threads )...
2) the air hose to 12mm spark plug socket adapter better be operated with a regulated air source ... careful not to blow "something else"

(I would rather look into using a regulated leak down tester equipment with 12mm adapter ... and maybe a fiddely overhead valve spring compressor tool is not so bad in the end)

but maybe I am overthinking it ...
(convince me)
 

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asking myself the same question

but a few DIY warnings come to mind:
1) the spring compressor gets threaded to a aluminium head ( don't strip the threads )...
2) the air hose to 12mm spark plug socket adapter better be operated with a regulated air source ... careful not to blow "something else"

(I would rather look into using a regulated leak down tester equipment with 12mm adapter ... and maybe a fiddely overhead valve spring compressor tool is not so bad in the end)

but maybe I am overthinking it ...
(convince me)
A friend of mine used the Lloyd'z and it worked perfect for him. Here's a photo he sent me, hopefully he will not mind. He used rope, I used air, which is what I've always used. As @cmoalem points out a leak down tester works well (Harbor Freight), I did not use mine, just the hose from it and 90 PSI. Heck the cylinder pressure gets far greater than that, in fact, that is cranking PSI with the compression releases working.

Lloydz tool.jpeg
 

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A friend of mine used the Lloyd'z and it worked perfect for him. Here's a photo he sent me, hopefully he will not mind. He used rope, I used air, which is what I've always used. As @cmoalem points out a leak down tester works well (Harbor Freight), I did not use mine, just the hose from it and 90 PSI. Heck the cylinder pressure gets far greater than that, in fact, that is cranking PSI with the compression releases working.

View attachment 523308
good to know ... thanks for the info!
From the photo this engine did not have to get dropped much (if at all?).
Clear advantage of the Lloydz spring compressor ... the other overhead universal fleabay compressors would need some more space there I think.

Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk
 

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That's my engine and as I told Craig, removing and replacing the springs with the Lloydz tool, was by far, the easiest part of the whole ordeal. I had to drop the engine about 2" straight down, cut the zip ties for the wiring along the neck and disconnected the knock sensor wire. That was it. Didn't disconnect any other wiring up on top.
 

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$60 is a little spendy for the tool IMO. Drop the engine 2" or 6", is there really much of a difference?

Sent from my LM-G820 using Tapatalk
 

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The cheap spring compressors only work well with the engine dropped quite a ways. The frame sits right in the way. Lloydz tool looks to be a great solution.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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As a side note about the procedure of using air to hold the valves up, the old school of holding valves up without air may still work on these engines and you don't have to worry about loss of air. With the spark plug removed, rotate the engine slowly by hand, using the transmission in gear and rotating the rear wheel. Get the piston to where it starts to come up on the compression stroke and hold it there. Then feed some rope through the spark plug hole, bring the piston up till you feel the piston stop. The rope should hold the valve in place so that it will not drop and allow you to remove the spring with the spring compressor. Worked in a pinch when we did not have access to an air compressor. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
[QUOTE="Taco mike, post: 3327006, member: 110716"[/QUOTE]Did this video ever get posted?[/QUOTE]
I got tired of waiting, never saw it. Good tool, poor follow up to their own comments and promises. I put a 2nd nut on the stud to help insert and remove the tool stud from the heads. Pull and mark the pushrods so you can reinsert them exactly as stock (right/left-top/bottom). Makes stuffing a rag into each pushrod tube easier and better so nothing goes thru. You do not want to loose anything down the pushrod tubes, trust me.
 
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