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Hello again friends!

I'm wanting to do some performance upgrades, including ditching the stock exhaust. But in my first year of ownership, I'm still struggling to learn the lean angle when cornering. I don't consider myself hard on my corner angles but clearly I need to make adjustments in my riding style before I change pipes.

Attached a photo for reference, but I'm hopeful someone can offer some suggestions for cornering properly on this thing so I can stop scuffing my pipes up.
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I'm no expert, but if you shift a little of your weight to the inside of the bike, the bike won't have to lean as much to make a given arc. Make your body adjustments before you get to the corner.
No need to hang your ass off, even upper body shift makes a diff.
No expert here, its just physics.
Were you riding two-up?
 

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Also, do you air up your rear shock once in awhile?
Even with my wife on back, I'm not sure I could chew up the pipes like that unless I dreamed I was knee-draggin' an R1.
 

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If you don't ride hard on the corners then my first thought is body position. If you're st1ff on the bars or lean opposite from the corner you will need to lean the bike further over. This is why you see motorcycle racers hanging off their bikes. Here is a perfect example of what not to do. Notice how the biker is keeping his left arm stiff which keeps his body high and centered on the right side of the bike.

You don't have to do anything radical like this guy starting at t2:13 in this video

or even moving you butt around like this guy

Simply bend the inside elbow and remember C.O.W (Chin Over Wrist) or "kiss the mirror" which every is easier for you.
The result of either of these is to lean into the corner with your bike which keeps the weight on the inside. If you do that you'll be able to take the same corner at the same speed and not lean the bike over as far and therefore not scrap the pipes.

An awesome video that helped me a lot was Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist II. It is aimed more at sport bikes but it really helps understand how to ride a bike at speeds higher than parking lots. There is a companion book for the video as well.
 

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Good inside leaning tips. I do that on occasion, too. Most I've found I nick the pipe tips are coming out of an elevated driveway or curb ramp on to the street. Done that a couple times. And I try to keep an eye on the shock pressure. Mine slowly lowers itself in pressure. At least the hand pump will get it back up there quickly for a little while. I've found the most scrapes with low pressure in the shock on mine.
 

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100% agree with Ramble_On and Lord Prime it is Air Pressure in the Shock !! Or to be More Precise The Lack of Enough Air in the Shock !! I Run 50 lbs Solo 75 lbs to 100 lbs Two Up plus all My Wife's ( Necities )

Sent from my SM-G998U1 using Tapatalk
 

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I also agree with shock pressure
Im not a lightweight and I run my shock on chieftain at 50 lbs
Stock tire pressures 36 F 41 R
No probs what so ever
 

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Oh tire pressure is another good one too. I think mine is about the same as Xtreme's. But the rear always starts out low. But after some riding the notification stays gone. And when I cycle through my screens I have set up, one is tire pressure. Front is 36 or 38, and the rear is around 40 or 41. But I forgot to mention, and I don't even know if it did anything or not, but I had a lowering shock put on it before I knew more about riding now than I did before. I should have left it stock. So that is an additional loss of height there, too.
 

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I came back to this because I didn't have time before. There are two types of riders. Ones that have crashed and the ones who are going to crash. You are definitely in the 2nd group. So I would recommend wear GEAR. Full helmet. Chest and back protector. Sidi boots ballistic jeans and full gloves would be nice. But if nothing else, full helmet.
Want to go fast? It's your eyes. You go where you are looking. Wanna go faster? Look further down the road. Watch the vids Goat Locker posted. Watch their heads. The faster they go the further out of the turn they focus on.
Lean into the turn. C O W. You're not. You're all leaned away from the turn. You can tell from the road rash on your bike. Slow down. Focus on stable bike. Slowly get your lean in, COW, catch the Apex perfect? give her throttle. you will soon feel like Ninja Indian rider ... fast faster grass hopper.

This is from 12 years ago ... FLASH BACK! lol. my first bike ... but it shows lean COW and the light touch on the bars and seat.

ride safe
 

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Good job,I've ground my floor boards.
I don't think I've ground my pipes,but really Haven't looked.
Looks like you know what you're doing,or you would have scrapes down the side to match.
 

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Here’s what I did by accident and it kept me from dragging my exhaust on twisty roads. When I removed the cat converter, I put the exhaust back together with the bolt on this clamp (yellow arrow) pointed down. That made the end of the bolt touch the pavement first, just before the mufflers would hit. So, when I’d hear the bolt drag (and you’ll hear it) I’d know to let up.
51876CDA-88F1-465E-8095-40F66DC6A133.jpeg
 

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You're a braver man than me, on these stock Dunlop E3, I'm very wary of pushing the tires and Chieftain too hard to 'learn the lean angle limit'.
 

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Here’s what I did by accident and it kept me from dragging my exhaust on twisty roads. When I removed the cat converter, I put the exhaust back together with the bolt on this clamp (yellow arrow) pointed down. That made the end of the bolt touch the pavement first, just before the mufflers would hit. So, when I’d hear the bolt drag (and you’ll hear it) I’d know to let up.
View attachment 642006
Good idea,but by the time I start the sparks flying its way too late to let up lol.
I had a pan head with a squish pipe,if you haven't run one,it runs the front pipe along the frame.
Well I had that bike in a hard turn ,scrapping hard on that pipe.i ground off the clamp and ended into oncoming lane.that wakes a fellow up. I had finger indents in the grips.
 
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