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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Friends, dead of Winter right now. Had an issue back in late Summer on our '17 Roadmaster. So, washed the bike as I've done many times, however on this occasion took a ride shortly after completing the wash job and a bud that was riding on his bike noticed my turn signals kept coming on - on their own, and switching on their own from one side signal to the other on the opposite side. This kept occurring for about 20 miles. It was a hot day and after riding for an hr or so the issue went away. I'm thinking ECM must of got wet obviously or other component that doesn't like water. I had rode in downpours in the past without any issues. Anyone one else experience any similar problems ? From now on I am going to try and avoid hosing down any electronics on the bike, but hell the there are electronics everywhere on the Roadmasters! I think it many be best to to use detail spray and avoid washing as often as possible. Appreciate your feedback, JD
 

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My bike has to be really filthy dirty before I get the hose and bucket out. Usually some damp microfiber cloths, my Lucas Spray Mist, and dry cloths are all I need and maybe once or twice during the season I use S100 on the motor/tranny areas. Oh, and when I do need to get the hose out I don't really spray any area--just turn the hose on low and kinda let the water fall like rain. So far, never had any problem with that method on a bunch of bikes over the years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My bike has to be really filthy dirty before I get the hose and bucket out. Usually some damp microfiber cloths, my Lucas Spray Mist, and dry cloths are all I need and maybe once or twice during the season I use S100 on the motor/tranny areas. Oh, and when I do need to get the hose out I don't really spray any area--just turn the hose on low and kinda let the water fall like rain. So far, never had any problem with that method on a bunch of bikes over the years.
Yeah I was thinking the same as you, just try to avoid turning a hose loose on it. Although, we all get caught from time to time in driving rain storms where everything gets soaked to the bone. I think after looking at another thread on here I will do as this guy did and take apart the switch housing up on the handlebars and spray the inner connections with dielectric grease. He said he did this and had no other issues with his turn signals coming on after getting wet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My bet is that water got into the left control pod where the signal switch is. Good luck!
I think your probably right. I'm going to take the screws out of the housing and spray some dielectric grease on the connections. Thanks bro for the head up!!
 

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2012 Indian Chief Vintage . 2016 Indian Roadmaster
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Usually I use Windex and paper towels. Once or twice I may use a hose and bucket. I'm sorry you are having issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Usually I use Windex and paper towels. Once or twice I may use a hose and bucket. I'm sorry you are having issues.
Thanks! Going to try spraying inner turn signal handlebar housing wiring connnections with dielectric grease as was suggested by another member.
 

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2018 Indian Scout Bobber 69 & 2021 Indian Chieftain
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Unfortunately nothing but soap and water works when your bike is covered in bugs.

And even if you use those other methods, in my opinion ,it scratches the Eff out of the clear coat. I have two thunder black bikes and only use soft car wash soap and a microfiber mit.
 

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I think your probably right. I'm going to take the screws out of the housing and spray some dielectric grease on the connections. Thanks bro for the head up!!
Blowing some compressed air through it first may not hurt either. Good Luck !
 

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2021 Roadmaster 116
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My bike has to be really filthy dirty before I get the hose and bucket out. Usually some damp microfiber cloths, my Lucas Spray Mist, and dry cloths are all I need and maybe once or twice during the season I use S100 on the motor/tranny areas. Oh, and when I do need to get the hose out I don't really spray any area--just turn the hose on low and kinda let the water fall like rain. So far, never had any problem with that method on a bunch of bikes over the years.
Yep, that's exactly how I do it.
 

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I recently rode my Roadmaster to work in the rain. A Harley-riding coworker told me that it was going to take me 20 hours of detailing to get it cleaned back up. FWIW, I’ve never seen his Harley - Oregon weather might be suitable for him about May.

My bike is my daily driver (8-9 months a year, anyway) and it gets pretty filthy before I break down and wash it. It never gets a ‘trailer queen’ detailing-I just try to return it to ‘presentable’, as anything more is a waste of time in rainy Oregon. During the few dry months, I‘ll wash it about once per oil change. During the Oregon Rain Festival, it’ll be every 1000-1500 miles.

When the machine has gotten so filthy that I just have to wash it, it’s with a decent carwashing soap, such as Blue Coral, soft carwash brush and mitt, and hose-end sprayer (no pressure washer). On the upper parts of the bike, I use low-pressure spray to get the soap off without driving water into buttons and cracks. Controls don’t get soaped at all, so they don’t get direct spray. For the lower parts of the bike, I’ll spray off as much as I can before using the brush or mitt. I always try to avoid forcing water into any bearings, or other openings.

As soon as the wash is done, I use a motorcycle air drier, which gives the same effect as a shop vac with the hose on the exhaust side. Blowing water out of the controls is one of the things I do with it, and have cleared malfunctions that way (on my Vision). After the drying is done, I’ll spend about 2 minutes with a clean microfiber cloth and wiping down the chrome and mirror glass for water spots. I wrap up by cleaning the windshield with Bug Slide. Start-to-finish is 75-90 minutes, including putting away the hose and bucket.

Between washes, I’ll lightly wipe the rear fender and rear face of the saddlebags with a microfiber cloth to get the worst of the debris that collects there. I touch as lightly as possible and let the fibers pick the stuff off without scratching. For dry-season dust, I’ll use Meguiar’s Instant Detailer, or something similar, but only for special occasions that warrant a 5-minute touch-up.

Other things that I’ve tried:
Pressure washers - gets water where water doesn’t belong, can easily damage parts
Pig Snot motorcycle soap - hard to rinse residual film away
Leaf blower for drying - works, but hard to control without dinging the bike
Shop Vac for drying - works, but my Shop Vac hoses have been used for dirt and sawdust and can spit some at the bike
Compressed air gun for drying - suprisingly ineffective, not enough volume
Simple Green or Clear Magic - great for cleaning and degreasing the lower parts of the bike, but needs to be washed off with soap from chrome or plexi parts.
Automotive bug remover sprays - some work well, but all that I’ve tried need to be followed with soap and brush
Chamois or artificial chamois for drying - workable, but damn, how long it takes on a bike (save this for the Harleys)
Coin-op carwash - aside from being a pressure washer, you also wind up washing your bike hot

Here’s the drier I use, currently $245 on Amazon. I’ve been using it now for ten years. There are options up and down the price scale, but I like this one and think it has paid for itself in a decade.

Camera accessory Bicycle part Font Cable Automotive lighting

 

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2022 Chief Bobber Dark Horse, 2021 Vintage, 2019 FTR-RR, 2021 Scout Bobber, 1977 Yamaha XS750
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I like the idea of blow drying the water off after a wash. The Metro Vacs are great but expensive. My son-in-law Jameson turned me onto a cheaper alternative. We use a small portable electric leaf blower!
 

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My 16 RM did this once after a washing. It finally stopped, and I attributed it to getting water in the left control housing on the handlebars.
 

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When I do occasionally get the hose out for washing I don't spray any of the switches or housings on the bars. They are all chrome on my Challenger and a damp microfiber cloth will take off the dirt, grime, bugs and anything else on them. No need to get them wet with the hose.
 

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Hello Friends, dead of Winter right now. Had an issue back in late Summer on our '17 Roadmaster. So, washed the bike as I've done many times, however on this occasion took a ride shortly after completing the wash job and a bud that was riding on his bike noticed my turn signals kept coming on - on their own, and switching on their own from one side signal to the other on the opposite side. This kept occurring for about 20 miles. It was a hot day and after riding for an hr or so the issue went away. I'm thinking ECM must of got wet obviously or other component that doesn't like water. I had rode in downpours in the past without any issues. Anyone one else experience any similar problems ? From now on I am going to try and avoid hosing down any electronics on the bike, but hell the there are electronics everywhere on the Roadmasters! I think it many be best to to use detail spray and avoid washing as often as possible. Appreciate your feedback, JD
I wash my Dark horse about once a month. I never towel or chamois dry it. I use my leaf blower. Or you can reverse flow a shop vac, be sure filter is clean. It gets all the water off faster than towel drying & a quick blast of each switch assembly ensures to me of no residual water in there. Towel or chamois drying is a surface rubbing against another surface. Thats friction which cause scratches. I then use a fine mist spray detailer & only new microfiber towels. I have 1 bag of new microfiber towels just for the bikes coated surfaces. The wheels, tires, engine covers, I use separate towels. Walmart or Harbor freight sells em cheap by the bundle.
 

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I've usually wash my bike about every other week or so (I use it every day) and never had had any issues like this one thank God! I use soap and water in a bucket and clean the bike with soaked rags and brushes and to rinse I use the shower part of the hose nozzle (I never use any type of spray setting). Good to know the advice in case this ever happens to me. Thanks guys!
 

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I like the idea of blow drying the water off after a wash. The Metro Vacs are great but expensive. My son-in-law Jameson turned me onto a cheaper alternative. We use a small portable electric leaf blower!
I use leaf blower too works great 👍
 

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Usually I use Windex and paper towels. Once or twice I may use a hose and bucket. I'm sorry you are having issues.
I wouldn't recommend windex it has ammonia which is hard on stuff. I use purple slice or one of the other spray and wipe cleaners that are designed for a motorcycle or automobile.
 

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2016 Indian Roadmaster 120 Stroker
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I use a Harbor Freight blower $50 occasionally, but never use a garden hose on the bike. Usually a bit of Dawn dish soap in warm water on microfibre cloth, followed by water rinse on microfibre cloth and just spot wash/wipe. I never use paper towels as they are too abrasive!
 
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