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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Many times, here and elsewhere, I’ve heard people state, “The Scout is not a tour bike.” Interesting. Let’s look closer...

The Cambridge Dictionary defines “tour” as:

“a visit to a place or area, especially one during which you look around the place or area and learn about it.”

Notice, please, that definition does not say anything about burning cross-country as fast as one can, nor driving x number of miles per day, nor carrying as much gear as possible. Those qualities may fit other types of riding, but do not fit this definition of to “tour.”

The definition, however, does say “visit,” “look,” “learn” about a place or area. To take in the sights, to meander, to take a journey and learn. To stop and look. That is what it means to tour. Difficult to do any of those if one is riding past the area at 80+mph with the goal to get from A to Z in the least amount of time possible.

And, if one is smart and attendant to the essentials, one can easily carry minimal gear and clothing. (As a Boy Scout, I learned to pack a simple canvas backpack with enough gear for a 50 mile, 10 day sojourn into the wilderness.)

Considering all that, then, “Yes,” the Indian Scout is well suited to the task of a tour bike. Easy to maneuver, powerful, nimble, able to easily carry people and gear, and comfortable for touring. If one is, indeed, touring.

At the very least, I argue the Scout should not be tossed out as a viable choice simply because it is a Scout. Maybe one should consider what to “tour” means, to them alone, before rushing to judgement for others and baldly stating, “The Scout is not a tour bike.”

Just MHO. I’m sure others may share theirs as well. That is one purpose for a forum!
 

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Many times, here and elsewhere, I’ve heard people state, “The Scout is not a tour bike.” Interesting. Let’s look closer...

The Cambridge Dictionary defines “tour” as:

“a visit to a place or area, especially one during which you look around the place or area and learn about it.”

Notice, please, that definition does not say anything about burning cross-country as fast as one can, nor driving x number of miles per day, nor carrying as much gear as possible. Those qualities may fit other types of riding, but do not fit this definition of to “tour.”

The definition, however, does say “visit,” “look,” “learn” about a place or area. To take in the sights, to meander, to take a journey and learn. To stop and look. That is what it means to tour. Difficult to do any of those if one is riding past the area at 80+mph with the goal to get from A to Z in the least amount of time possible.

And, if one is smart and attendant to the essentials, one can easily carry minimal gear and clothing. (As a Boy Scout, I learned to pack a simple canvas backpack with enough gear for a 50 mile, 10 day sojourn into the wilderness.)

Considering all that, then, “Yes,” the Indian Scout is well suited to the task of a tour bike. Easy to maneuver, powerful, nimble, able to easily carry people and gear, and comfortable for touring. If one is, indeed, touring.

At the very least, I argue the Scout should not be tossed out as a viable choice simply because it is a Scout. Maybe one should consider what to “tour” means, to them alone, before rushing to judgement for others and baldly stating, “The Scout is not a tour bike.”

Just MHO. I’m sure others may share theirs as well. That is one purpose for a forum!
wOw.......What Hypothetical Thinking....a Wizard? Thou true, considering the scenario of "tour", to a Motorcycle.....Bags..Dressers....Stereos.....Cruise Control....Heated Seats/Grips....."TOUR" PACKS.......Windshields.......Individual Comfort is the End Means.....I'll "tour" w/my Scout anytime.......
 

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Closer to popular opinion “The Scout is not tour bike for some people” .
Any and All bikes can be used for touring , they all beat walking !
I road hundreds of miles on 10 speed road bikes years ago , I enjoy many bikes some for more miles than others !
Your requirements and comfort are up to you , Ride what you Like and Enjoy !
The choice of what you ride is up to You .👍
 

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Many times, here and elsewhere, I’ve heard people state, “The Scout is not a tour bike.” Interesting. Let’s look closer...

The Cambridge Dictionary defines “tour” as:

“a visit to a place or area, especially one during which you look around the place or area and learn about it.”

Notice, please, that definition does not say anything about burning cross-country as fast as one can, nor driving x number of miles per day, nor carrying as much gear as possible. Those qualities may fit other types of riding, but do not fit this definition of to “tour.”

The definition, however, does say “visit,” “look,” “learn” about a place or area. To take in the sights, to meander, to take a journey and learn. To stop and look. That is what it means to tour. Difficult to do any of those if one is riding past the area at 80+mph with the goal to get from A to Z in the least amount of time possible.

And, if one is smart and attendant to the essentials, one can easily carry minimal gear and clothing. (As a Boy Scout, I learned to pack a simple canvas backpack with enough gear for a 50 mile, 10 day sojourn into the wilderness.)

Considering all that, then, “Yes,” the Indian Scout is well suited to the task of a tour bike. Easy to maneuver, powerful, nimble, able to easily carry people and gear, and comfortable for touring. If one is, indeed, touring.

At the very least, I argue the Scout should not be tossed out as a viable choice simply because it is a Scout. Maybe one should consider what to “tour” means, to them alone, before rushing to judgement for others and baldly stating, “The Scout is not a tour bike.”

Just MHO. I’m sure others may share theirs as well. That is one purpose for a forum!
With a comfortable seat , cool bags , boards, apes, and yeah pipes,, it’ll go a long way. The gas tank is the only real down side to touring the scout.,, but if stopping every 100 mile is cool with you, the it’s all good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Closer to popular opinion “The Scout is not tour bike for some people” .
Any and All bikes can be used for touring , they all beat walking !
I road hundreds of miles on 10 speed road bikes years ago , I enjoy many bikes some for more miles than others !
Your requirements and comfort are up to you , Ride what you Like and Enjoy !
The choice of what you ride is up to You .👍
Exactly so!
 

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If comfort is part of the touring equation (Scout) then there is only (2) answers. How old or you-or-how big is your a$$. When your young enough you can tolerate touring on anything, even a Suzuki DRZ. If your Bottom has enough padding you can tour on just about anything. I’m old and have no a$$, so I can no longer tour too far on a stock Scout.
 

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We can end this here and now. What would the discussion be if Indian announces that it has a new touring bike coming to the market. We are all excited and when they draw back the curtain, it is ..... the scout.
 

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I've got a scout and two sport-touring bikes, a Motto Guzzi and a BMW. I love the scout for day rides on local twisty roads, but for any ride of more than a few hundred miles, I take one of the other bikes. Could I tour on the scout? Sure, it has saddle bags, a large windscreen, and a tail rack. However, in terms of comfort and ease of handling for a 71 YO, it can't come close to the other bikes. Fuel range is another issue, especially when I travel out west. If Indian were to produce a sport-tourer based on the scout motor/ tranny, I'd but one in a minute.

Jon
 

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Depends on your definition of touring. The Scout will easily do a 300-400 mile trip in a day every now and then. If you're the type of guy that only gets to take a vacation twice a year and can't justify the cost of a larger bike, the Scout will do you just fine on a 2000 mile road trip, equipped properly with saddlebags, windscreen, foot boards, etc. However, if you're looking for something to take cross-country or have your butt in the saddle for 3 weeks straight, I'd look elsewhere.

As for me, I spent a lot of extra $$$ on accessories for my Scout that I won't get the money back out of if I try to trade it, to the point that when I consider the total sum price of the bike as she sits today, I could easily have been on a used Springfield. Hindsight is 20-20. Nothing wrong with the bike I've got, she's a fine machine, just maybe not the best fit for where I fit into the motorcycling world. I've also looked into renting bikes through EagleRider for longer trips, but it's just too expensive.

Moral of the story is I would advise anyone considering a Scout to really consider what kind of riding they do and realize what they're going to get in return for particular price points.
 

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Decades ago I rode a 750 Virago from Tampa to mid Michigan with a passenger. I don't remember any agony but my backside was younger then. We camped every night and IIRC it was a fun.

Would I do it now. No. Not even on a large bagger. I'm too old.

This year I am going to 'tour'. Looking into a trailer for the Scout. I'll drag it to the destination and then tour the area. Stay in motels and with friends.

IF I were younger, I'd do that on the Scout.

Being older has given me a great appreciation of comfort. I can easily do 5 hours on the Scout. I'm unwilling to live for days in the saddle anymore.
 
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