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Question, for those of us that replaced our intakes and added slip-ons. once you had the ECU re flashed, have you noticed a change in gas mileage? I have swapped out the stock intake for the Indian After market Hurricane intake, and bought a fuel moto Dynojet PV3 Power Vision 3. I already had crusher slip-ons. Before the intake change and ECU remap, the low fuel dummy light came on about 120 miles. and if I filled up right then it was usually about 2.7 - 2.9 gallons of gas. after all my changes, I note the dummy light didn't come on until about 130 miles, I rode maybe another 5 or so and only added 2.7 gallons. have any of you seen these types of changes? or better yet, after you have done all these changes, what kind of mileage are you getting now?

AND GO!
 

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I'm guessing that making the fuel/air ratio richer would decrease the gas mileage a tad.
 

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I just fueled my 60 up. The light came on around 136 miles, got to the gas station at 139.2 and got exactly 2.63 gal in. That's 52.9 gal/mile and depending on how and where I ride, I'm usually between 50 and 55 miles/gal. This tank was purely leisurely back-road riding, enjoying the nice days we're having right now here in the Midwest. I have the crusher slip-ons installed like you do, but on the air intake, all I did was, put the high flow K&N filter instead of the OEM paper-thing. No remapping. I have the "Booster-Plug" installed which takes care of too lean of a mixture in open loop conditions. Have that on my Bonnie since a couple years, too, and love it on both bikes! I know, let's not start a discussion if this "thing" actually works or not, it works for me and if it doesn't work for anybody else, so be it. (y) ;)
 

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A couple of thoughts on the subject of mileage. Mine goes down a little in the winter and back up as the weather warms. A Sportster friend says the same thing. I theorize that the reason is the change from winter to summer gasoline formulation.

Mine has improved by several mpg (back up to low to mid 50s. Got a couple tanks close to 60 in the last two weeks. Same riding on same countryroads. No commuting, so my riding is very consistent which is helpful in analyzing this.

Low fuel warning light. Very inconsistent and thus absolutely worthless if one wants to avoid running out of gas. I carefully check my mileage the old fashioned way and rely only on that for deciding when to stop for gas.
 
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The winter/summer blends do indeed effect your MPG as well as the quality of the fuel used.

To insure best MPG, buy your gas at station that has new tanks and has a lot of "traffic". This insures that the amount of water in the fuel is minimal and that there is less "separation" of the gasoline's components.
 

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My gas mileage has gone down because I’m taking advantage of the performance increase. My bike rarely sees any use below 3500rpm and I just fill up every 100 miles or so.
 

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My Scout improved after the first year, worse was the very beginning, probably because I bought it in January.
Had the Dynojet tuner by September of that year, if I remember that right.
Still all stock using the stock tune file provided by Dynojet.
MPG drop can be drastic when going above 60 mph, only getting mid to upper 40s when sustaining 70 mph. Otherwise going slower attains 10 mile per gallon increase.
I’ve also always had a windshield, never compared with and without.
 

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My gas mileage has gone down because I’m taking advantage of the performance increase. My bike rarely sees any use below 3500rpm and I just fill up every 100 miles or so.
I got michellin commander II and my milage went from 100 to 110- 120 before fuel light
 

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If you put Commander IIs on a Thunderstroke bike the rear tire has a slightly bigger diameter with a 2% greater circumference. That could help explain the increased gas mileage. I'm not sure if the rear tire for the Scout has the same difference in outside diameter but that could be the case.
 
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