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Being one of likely many that don't like the handling of the pre 2020 Indian vintage I was looking at spare parts for the 2020 and noted the front frame member and neck can be purchased.
Does anyone know if this would fit the earlier model?
Just way to expensive to trade the bike to get the newer frame and I hate riding the bike as is.
To be honest I think Indian should be doing something for Vintage owners as the original frame was a huge design error proven by the change to the frame for 2020.
Looks should never trump function in my opinion.
 

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Curious, what is wrong with the handling of the pre 2020 bikes? I have a 2015 and don't find anything wrong with it at all. And I push mine much harder through corners than most people ever will. That's why I have to keep buying new floor boards from mine being all scraped up.
 

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The new vintage bikes have the same geometry as the Springfield and Touring bikes.
Mush easier to turn.
I'm interested in the same mod if it works...
 

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Would that be a weld on project? I am speaking for myself, that would scare the H-E-double hockey sticks outta me riding something such as that. I don't care how good the welder is, there is a great deal of stress at that particular junction in the frame. I am not an expert, nor do I play one on TV, I am just offering an observation after almost 50 years of motorcycle riding. YMMV
 
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I don't think it would be a weld type project... the frames are modular and use the engine for support and strength.. but I think you might need to buy new triple trees and possibly forks..
 
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Thanks HPR. That's kinda cool. The WWII 741 Indian Scouts were similar in construction in that the engine and transmission were a frame component.
 

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The frames are all bolted, so no welding. If you get onto a parts site such as PartShark you can see the exploded assembly.

Remember that the VIN is on the front frame member so it's worth checking with Indian to see what the deal is when buying a new part. They might engrave the new one with your old number.

There were also different triple trees with different rake/trail. That might have changed as the new bikes seem to be adopting the Springfield/RM parts, but I think my 2018 Springfield DH has a different front again - I've not kept up with the details. Once again, it's worth doing the homework to see what the options are for those angles on the current bikes.
 

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Even though the neck is modular, the VIN number is the important issue. I'm sure that I/P has had to replace the neck on bikes and they are probably required to follow certain procedures to do so. Their maybe requirements e.g. it to has to be removed and replaced at a dealership only and there may also be requirements to destroy the original neck so that it cannot be used again. The dealer would know these rules
 

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Being one of likely many that don't like the handling of the pre 2020 Indian vintage I was looking at spare parts for the 2020 and noted the front frame member and neck can be purchased.
Does anyone know if this would fit the earlier model?
Just way to expensive to trade the bike to get the newer frame and I hate riding the bike as is.
To be honest I think Indian should be doing something for Vintage owners as the original frame was a huge design error proven by the change to the frame for 2020.
Looks should never trump function in my opinion.
There are positives and negatives to all the bikes. Your bike has more leg room and is more stretched out with the longer rake, which makes it much more stable in a cross wind at 80-90 mph.

The difference is only 4 degrees and the trail difference is .9.

It's a lot of work to do what you suggest. You should just trade it in on a new one.

Some love the longer rake and trail. Especially taller guys. Hell, the Gilroy models had a 34 degree rake, beach bars, and were really hard to turn in slow conditions, but guys loved them. The Scouts and Spirits from that era had a 32 degree rake and everyone thought that was a revelation.

So your Vintage is still a really well handling bike.

And BTW, there is nothing wrong with your pre 2020 frame or front end. It is an old school style ride and feels like one in the wind. I find them to be quite awesome running 100 mph on the slab.

And you don't need a new frame. You get a neck and triple trees. And there was no design error in the frame. It was designed to be what it is. And the only reason they changed the neck part in 2020 had nothing to do with design. It had to do with cost savings and less diversity in parts on the assembly line. A common manufactured part in all bikes creates less errors and quicker assembly. It is the motorcycle platform mentality.

The design issue really was the Springfield with the weird 46 psi in the front and 41 in the rear. Read those threads. I have a Springfield and love it, but I too, originally, was one of the guys that thought the published tire pressure in the owners manual was a typo. We all know now it was not!
 

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On top of needing new triple clamps and the frame piece (assuming there's no issue with the VIN transfer, etc.) you would need to get a new Nacelle as well. The bolts that align and mount the nacelle to the fork legs have a different spacing and the bottom hole is about a half inch off. You'd be about $2K in parts alone for this "fix."

I have a Vintage and a Springfield and can tell you they both ride and handle great. The only difference is in U-Turn radius and slow speed movement of the bike - once they get above 10-15MPH, they are essentially the same. The Springfield does feel more nimble in spirited riding in the twisties, but the Vintage just takes a little more effort to run the exact same way.
 
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What Pablo said! I cannot imagine the bike riding that terrible. I ride a SF and it is the best handling bike I have ridden. I don't think the Vintage is that far off. Maybe you need to look at you tire pressures, alignment, suspension, steering head etc...
 

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What Pablo said! I cannot imagine the bike riding that terrible. I ride a SF and it is the best handling bike I have ridden. I don't think the Vintage is that far off. Maybe you need to look at you tire pressures, alignment, suspension, steering head etc...
The SF and Vintage are very different feeling bikes in regards to turning. The SF has the best handling in the Indian line-up. Which is why the newer Vintages come with the new rake. I remember hopping on the SF when it first got delivered to my dealership. Right when I got out of the driveway I was met with a big surprise at how much easier the turning was. It felt like a smaller more nimble bike. I can see why the OP would look into swapping steering stems. But it would be way, way expensive. Only way I could see about going about it. Would be finding a wrecked SF for a good price and swapping parts. But we all know that the majority of wrecked bikes, the steering and front end are generally first to be wrecked. You would have to find a bike that was totaled due to water damage or something. I've seen it happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Would that be a weld on project? I am speaking for myself, that would scare the H-E-double hockey sticks outta me riding something such as that. I don't care how good the welder is, there is a great deal of stress at that particular junction in the frame. I am not an expert, nor do I play one on TV, I am just offering an observation after almost 50 years of motorcycle riding. YMMV
From the parts expanded diagram it appears to be a bolt on part. If it fits it should be quite easy. Guess we need an indian rep to tell us if it would work. Still costs $1000.00 though!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Then why the hell did you buy the damn thing?

@pablo94 said everything else that needs to be heard.
Did not get a test ride and even then when you pull away it feels good until you need to turn fairly tight at slow speed to go into a gas station or up my own driveway.

Never have test driven a bike prior to purchase as most dealers don't allow it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What Pablo said! I cannot imagine the bike riding that terrible. I ride a SF and it is the best handling bike I have ridden. I don't think the Vintage is that far off. Maybe you need to look at you tire pressures, alignment, suspension, steering head etc...
I have checked tire pressures and suspension. jacking up the rear shock helped a bit. Alignment and steering head were checked at the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The SF and Vintage are very different feeling bikes in regards to turning. The SF has the best handling in the Indian line-up. Which is why the newer Vintages come with the new rake. I remember hopping on the SF when it first got delivered to my dealership. Right when I got out of the driveway I was met with a big surprise at how much easier the turning was. It felt like a smaller more nimble bike. I can see why the OP would look into swapping steering stems. But it would be way, way expensive. Only way I could see about going about it. Would be finding a wrecked SF for a good price and swapping parts. But we all know that the majority of wrecked bikes, the steering and front end are generally first to be wrecked. You would have to find a bike that was totaled due to water damage or something. I've seen it happen.
I think being a smaller rider 5' 8" and 160 pounds amplifies the difference between the two frame designs.
 

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I'd have bought the bike from a different dealer. Every dealer I have ever dealt with allows test rides. I would never buy a bike from a dealer without a test ride. Buying from a private owner is different.

Rob
 

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Back in the day, having ridden a 12 over raked Pan for several years, I gotta say my '15 Vintage handles quite nicely :ROFLMAO:
 

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I think being a smaller rider 5' 8" and 160 pounds amplifies the difference between the two frame designs.
I'm the same height and weigh 10lbs lighter. I can turn a vintage in figure eights and scrape the floorboards while just feathering the clutch. There's something to be said about practice. Go to a parking lot and do drills. The steering on the Vintage isn't bad at all.

Something that I have noticed while watching a lot of other riders and take turns. Is that not enough bikers move their hips and or allow the bike to move more freely beneath them. I've seen stiffs on bikes from novice riders all the way up through riders that have been doing it for 40+ years. we should all be learning constantly. Don't be so quick to blame the machine.

It is very, very surprising that a dealer did not let you test ride. I almost don't believe it. Polaris tells dealers to make 1 bike from every model a designated test bike. Dealers get incentives for it from Polaris.
 
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