Indian Motorcycle Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
indian-scout-wall-of-death-625x416.jpg

The launch of the new Scout in Sturgis had to be more than a silly sheet-pull. So Indian Motorcycle looked to history for inspiration. Revealing the bike on a Wall of Death was the answer—with the task of creating a one-off machine falling to Indian’s own industrial design team, led by Greg Brew.

Rich Christoph, the lead designer on the production Scout, is the main man behind the Wall of Death Scout. And it’s more than just a pretty paintjob. Indian called in Jay Lightning and Charlie Ransom of the American Motor Drome Co. to figure out what mods the stock bike needed—and they’re pretty substantial.

indian-scout-wall-of-death-original-625x416.jpg

“We did some testing with Jay and Charlie at the Hog Rock Rally in southern Illinois about two months ago,” Christoph tells us. “The Scout went on the wall after the crowds had all gone. This was a rough, dirty version of the bike—in case we crashed it, or needed heavy mods. But it was a blast!”

Jay and Charlie are used to late 1920s 101 Scouts (above), which have around 19hp. But with custom headers and no mufflers, Indian’s test bike was pumping out a mighty 112hp, and the power delivery was simply too much. So an ECU recalibration was the first item on the list.

indian-scout-wall-of-death-1-625x625.jpg

The solo bucket seat—a styling highlight of the stock machine—turned out to be too narrow for Charlie to manipulate the bike on the wall. So a repro of an early Indian solo seat was created by Minneapolis-based Vinyl-lux, modified so that it could be tucked down behind the tank.

After installing it, Indian’s mechanics added a closeout panel under the seat, with a pigtail charging cord for battery maintenance. The stock tank was cut and shut by Jeb’s Metal and Speed before being painted by Indian’s own Steve Leszinski.

indian-scout-wall-of-death-4-625x416.jpg

Read More: The Wall of Death Indian Scout | Bike EXIF
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
This is pretty cool:

"Jay and Charlie are used to late 1920s 101 Scouts (above), which have around 19hp. But with custom headers and no mufflers, Indian’s test bike was pumping out a mighty 112hp, and the power delivery was simply too much. So an ECU recalibration was the first item on the list."
 

·
Founding member
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
Great stuff. Its crazy to think that with just a new exhaust, the bike was making too much power and they had to use the ECU to tune it down. I think this is good news for those like myself hoping to coax some more power out of the machine. The part about cutting the steering stops for tighter turns fascinated me as well. They were critical of the Scout's limited lock to lock steering in the Motorcycle-USA comparison. I wonder why Indian put it on the bike to begin with. Removing it will be another modification to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Good one Nick. The whole look of the Wall of Death Scout is cool. I'll be putting those drag bars on my Scout, when it arrives.........

And if Rich Christoph and colleagues read this forum, please Indian also think about factory bobbed fenders, black exhaust and slimmer/lower seat options too. Do this and world domination is assured.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
That might be tough, but all you need is someone with a mill and you can make it happen.
I'm a man with a Bridgeport mill.
Better off finding someone else as I'm fixing to sell my equipment.

It shouldn't be too difficult to produce a hard-tail conversion kit.

Personally, I'd keep the springs and put a spring solo saddle on it.
The Wall of Death bike is built that way for a reason. The hard tail
probably works to the rider's advantage in THAT application. On the
road, it's gonna hurt.
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
Good Morning,
The struts and solo saddle look good on that bike. You know there's going to be a market for those struts; one of the first things customizers do is hard-tail the frame. Never has a stock frame looked so good with simple struts installed. No need to cut the frame, just four bolts and its a sleek, low hardtail! Add an old-fashioned solo with springs and there's going to be a lot of folks who dig that look. And, if you've never ridden a rigid, they work a lot better than you might think, on anything other than a heavily pot-holed road. The rider is at the frame's pivot point, so the front and rear wheels rock the frame up and down with the rider at the point that moves least; the passenger, not so much, but there's always a price to be paid for style.
--- Randall
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
6,027 Posts
image.jpg

I like a rigid frame. You would too if you where a girl :eek:.

I am fortunate to have the space for several bikes, so each one serves a purpose. And suspension/lack thereof is a big part of the bike's utility. So the suspension on my GS is optimized for fast, hard-packed gravel, and the Ducati for the track, etc. etc. My cruising today is done on a shed-built '68 Bonnie which was bobbed and chopped and converted to a hardtail by simply cutting off the frame and welding an aftermarket rigid back. With nearly nothing except steel separating me from the road, there is nothing like it. The problem is, the Triumph is not made for long rides without a support van full of tools and extra parts. And it really doesn't stop well. Hence the new Indian Scout. And a rigid frame is among the most important modifications for me.

I am sure I can make one in an hour or less, and I am sure that within a few months there will be several aftermarket versions. I like what the ones on the WOD bike look like, and because they were made for high Gs and probably 'no expense spared,' I figure it's a good place to start.
 

·
Founding member
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
In this case, that price would be?
Well, blood in your urine, for starters. They do look cool, but I'll be leaving the hardtails to Randall and Meggie.
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
2,052 Posts
In this case, that price would be?
You may find passengers object to rigids, though some like them. The fact that passengers can be pitched off the bike on a hard bump was part of what lead to the popularity of tall sissy bars on rigid chops, although there was a notorious case where a sissy bar ending in an unsheathed bayonet blade led to the horrific death of a passenger spiked through the base of her skull.
--- Randall
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top