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A little rant: While I love my Roadmaster, IM should seriously consider firing the engineering crew that developed the drive belt adjustment system. This is the worst system I've encountered. Adjusting my HD belt was so much easier. On the HD, there are two cam lobes on the rear axle...one lobe touches the left swingarm, one touches the right. When you turn the adjustment lobe, it moves both the R and L side lobe at the same time...no guess work. The IM system reminds me of something you'd find on a dirt bike. Just adjusted my RM per the service manual and belt tracked in the middle of the rear pulley. Went for a ride and now it's tracking fully to the right. What a PITA.
 

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A little rant: While I love my Roadmaster, IM should seriously consider firing the engineering crew that developed the drive belt adjustment system. This is the worst system I've encountered. Adjusting my HD belt was so much easier. On the HD, there are two cam lobes on the rear axle...one lobe touches the left swingarm, one touches the right. When you turn the adjustment lobe, it moves both the R and L side lobe at the same time...no guess work. The IM system reminds me of something you'd find on a dirt bike. Just adjusted my RM per the service manual and belt tracked in the middle of the rear pulley. Went for a ride and now it's tracking fully to the right. What a PITA.
I agree, I have mentioned this on other threads also. Not sure why they designed this the way they did but whomever laid this out simply was not a mechanic at heart. The adjustment marks are worthless. They can pivot around in the slop of where they track and move a full mark when pivoting. Putting the adjusters on the inboard side of the swing arm is just stupid. Really makes putting the wheel on a pain in the ass. Two things to remember when adjusting the axle for proper belt tracking is that the axle nut has to be tight enough to allow adjustment but still allow the pulley assy to be bottomed out on the wheel assy. If you adjust the belt to where it tracks properly and then tighten the axle nut and the belt moves to one side they the axle nut was not tight enough. It usually takes two or three attempts to do correctly. Second, if you get everything done and then go riding don't be surprised if the belt now tracks to one side. As long as you don't hear any rubbing of the belt when rolling the tire forward or backwards then it is close enougt. Don't sweat it. Go ride. Dean
 

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So, is this the sequence to correct belt riding too far right: Since my belt deflection/tension is perfect and now the belt rides against the right lip of the pulley, I'll correct this by: Loosening the axle nut, loosening the left side adjuster, tap on the left side of the axle forward, toward front of bike. Then tighten the axle nut to 15 foot pounds. Turn rear wheel to see the belt start moving to the left. After belt moves as far left as it will go, start adjusting the left side adjuster to move the belt back towards the center. Does this sound correct...
 

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First of all, when you roll the wheel forward and backwards through a couple of turns do you hear or feel any rubbing of the belt? If not then don't bother going any further. If you have rub then slightly loosen the axle nut. Back off the left adjuster about half a turn and tap the left side of the axle forward and retighted the axle nut and see how things go from there. You get much further with minor adjustments that big ones. Remember it is not that important to get the belt to stay centered all the time. Just just don't want it too far to one side to have the belt rubbing into the side of the pulley. Like I mentioned, this is something that you can hear and feel when rolling the tire forward and backward with a few revolutions each time. D
 

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You're adjustment process sounds correct. Don't sweat it if the belt isn't exactly centered.

Ride it, if no chirping and the bike doesn't pull to one side at highway speed, you my friend are good to go.
 

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A little rant: While I love my Roadmaster, IM should seriously consider firing the engineering crew that developed the drive belt adjustment system. This is the worst system I've encountered. Adjusting my HD belt was so much easier. On the HD, there are two cam lobes on the rear axle...one lobe touches the left swingarm, one touches the right. When you turn the adjustment lobe, it moves both the R and L side lobe at the same time...no guess work. The IM system reminds me of something you'd find on a dirt bike. Just adjusted my RM per the service manual and belt tracked in the middle of the rear pulley. Went for a ride and now it's tracking fully to the right. What a PITA.
I have adjusted MANY belts, it’s rare to see them stay in the center even after a short ride. They will almost always go to one side or the other
 

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I have adjusted MANY belts, it’s rare to see them stay in the center even after a short ride. They will almost always go to one side or the other
Further, rolling the wheel backwards to track alignment gives you nothing. When I have adjusted all of my bikes with this setup, forward motion is the only one that matters and if it's tracking true, regardless of where it is on the pulley, you will get a different track rolling in reverse. Trying to get both in the same groove is pointless and impossible. Once you get used to the process, it's quite simple and 9 times out of 10, even changing the tire doesn't require an adjustment if your set screws at the end of the swingarm aren't moved.
 

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Turning the wheel by hand is not enough revolutions in my opinion. I always run the engine for a moment in first and second gear. If it stays centered then it will stay there for ever (next tire change :))
 

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Looking at the rear adjustment for tension, I understand the right side is for tension, left side adjustment for centering etc. What I don't understand is why not do both sides at the same time? If I move the right 1/2 turn clockwise for tighter why not move the left 1/3 or a 1/2 to start with and see where your at? Why adjust it to what should be out on purpose then inspect it to make sure you adjusted it out then align it?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Looking at the rear adjustment for tension, I understand the right side is for tension, left side adjustment for centering etc. What I don't understand is why not do both sides at the same time? If I move the right 1/2 turn clockwise for tighter why not move the left 1/3 or a 1/2 to start with and see where your at? What adjust it to what should be out on purpose then inspect it to make sure you adjusted it out then align it?
The next time I adjust my belt, I'm going to use this method. If my belt is riding in the center of the pulley and I make a 1/2 turn to tighten the belt, seems reasonable the left would need 1/2 turn too. The current method is a PITA to center the belt.
 

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The belt is easy to align

The swing arm marks are dead on accurate ( the oval washer on the nut side (left) and oval stud on the (right) that have the index mark that you use to reference the swing arm marks rotates forward when you loosen the axle nut and rotates aft when you tighten the axle nut, this causes the index mark on the the washer and the head on the pulley side to move almost 1/4 of an inch. That gives people the illusion the swing arm marks are not accurate.

Its simple guys, loosen the axle nut.
Adjust the belt tension
Then tighten the axle nut about a 1/4 turn so that the washer on the left side and the head of the axle (right side) is tilted all the way toward the aft position, you might need to slightly tap it aft. Now the index marks are oriented correctly. Adjust the left side to that the index marks match up exactly on both sides.

See how the belt tracks the very carefully adjust the left side so that the belt is left of center and that you can see pulley teeth on both sides.

NOTICE: The belt will never never never never never never track in the middle of the pulley!!!!!!!!!!! Adjusting the swing arm tensioners to center the belt is to fine tune align the wheel!

The pulley is wide on purpose to allow the belt to move side to side as the belt gets hot cold and expands and contracts.

Go to your dealer get on the floor and look where the belt tracks, you will see it sits toward the right side!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That is where they all will track if the wheel is aligned
correctly.

There are a bunch of Harley guys that ride in our group, none of their belts track in the center either.

Also all the Indian techs have been notified by Polaris that the belts will not track in the center and that as long as they are not rubbing up against the pulley they are fine.

Good reading here: https://www.indianmotorcycles.net/threads/what-am-i-missing-rear-belt-adjustment.299418/page-3#post-3071212
 

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I adjust mine as per the manual. I bring up the adjusters until they have tension, I torque the axle bolt to 15 ft-lb, adjust the right side adjuster until correct tension is achieved. (I use a Gates 508C sonic meter), then adjust the left side adjuster for the belt to run well. It will never track dead center, but more to the left. Once it is tracking well, I torque the axle to 65 ft-lbs and recheck tension and tracking. Once you do this a couple of times, it becomes very easy and fast.
 

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It is not rocket science!Patience and small adjustments are the key.Bottom line is some should just take it to the dealer because they have no clue!The manual explains the adjustment procedure very well!
 

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I adjust mine as per the manual. I bring up the adjusters until they have tension, I torque the axle bolt to 15 ft-lb, adjust the right side adjuster until correct tension is achieved. (I use a Gates 508C sonic meter), then adjust the left side adjuster for the belt to run well. It will never track dead center, but more to the left. Once it is tracking well, I torque the axle to 65 ft-lbs and recheck tension and tracking. Once you do this a couple of times, it becomes very easy and fast.
WHERE CAN one obtain the Gates 508C and how much do they cost? It looks like they cost over $1,200 on amazon!!! Holy Shit! lol. I D/L the apt for my phone, but results are not very repeatable. How ever is does help to verify your work.
 

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What is that "see thru gauge" ( on the plastic guard) to the belt good for ? Is that like a "GO- NO GO" fast setting kind of thing? I notice HD's have that also.
 

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WHERE CAN one obtain the Gates 508C and how much do they cost? It looks like they cost over $1,200 on amazon!!! Holy Shit! lol. I D/L the apt for my phone, but results are not very repeatable. How ever is does help to verify your work.
All that is needed is the frequency that the belt should vibrate at.

Any decent recent phone will be able to measure the frequency with enough accuracy.

If you are hand holding the phone that is probably part of your problem.

Take the phone out of the case, small movements can cause the edges of the cases to slightly obscure the microphone.

Tape it down onto a support so nothing is touching it.

Better yet is to invest in an outboard microphone.

The Apple app store has many apps just for this type of task.

The above is all very common on Ducati bikes as they have either 2 or 4 cam belts which when they fail, they take out the top end and that my friends, makes the costs of repair on Indian bikes look petty.

HTH.

Just to be clear, if you are using an Android unit, that may be your problem, the Apple phones work well and are accurate.
 
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