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Went for a ride up into the local mountain area, up and back about a hundred mile run which I've done hundreds of times, still snow at the sides of the road in sections but nothing major. Suns been out for days but a few areas on the backside of the mountain where the sun doesn't warm the road much during the day. When approching wet spots across the road I slow and make sure to cross straight up and at a 90 degree. Never had it happen before but ran across a couple of sections with ice on the road and it almost had me down. Front end let loose twice but luckly front caught traction and I made it thru. I think I'll restrict my mountian riding to a lower altitude for now.
 

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Definitely! I ride in some state forest and mountain roads as well and there is always some snow left in spots due to shade and temps being cooler there. I try to avoid those areas during this time of year for safety sake.
 

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The only time I've gone down was with my previous bike on a early spring morning. Even though it had been well above freezing for a couple days, it was right at 32 that morning. I took a different route to work than normal and I hit a patch of black ice from some snow melt that had run across the road on a gentle turn. I was able to keep it up by keeping the bike going straight ... until I hit the curb and the bike high-sided. Luckily I landed on some soft grass and was uninjured with only minor damage to the bike. I'll still ride in cold temps, but IMO when it is near 32 is the most risky. Be safe and respect the conditions.
 

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Julie and I were on a February ride into the foothills a couple of years ago. We were not the ride captains but shrugged when he headed west. We peeled off after about an hour at Boulder Canyon since we had to get back to our disabled son (left with his adult brother while we rode). The other two guys continued north on Peak-to-Peak highway. One of the guys hit what appeared to be water on a north-facing curve. It was ice and down he went. Spiral fracture of his right leg, lifetime rod, long recovery. He puts his bike up now from first snow to mid-May.

And the ride captain (50+ yrs of experience) takes no more rides into the foothills. Neither do we. If you don’t hit ice, you’ll hit sand. Altho we are certainly not afraid of sand, and ride thru it all winter on the flats, hitting sand on curves when you need to be secure in your line is simply dangerous.
 

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That made me remember this video of a guy taking a ride on Mt Lemon on a Victory Vision. Makes me hurt when I watch it. Ken

I have that T-shirt. While on my '74 Superglide the wife (now "X") and I hit black ice on US Route 81 here in central NY at around 70ish MPH. Now I wait for warmer weather before riding... I learn quick LOL.
 

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I used to ride down to 35 to 40 degrees until I discovered that ice doesn't thaw in the shade. I now wait until it's close to fifty before I'll get my bike out.
 

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I went down once on ice way back in 1978 when on my way to work one afternoon,but wasn't hurt and the bike only suffered minor damage cause I was only traveling at 25 mph ,if that, when it happened.But when it happened,it happened REAL QUICK! Why?? Cause I wasn't paying close enough attention to the existing road conditions,a mistake I made then,but won't be making again and haven't, since.Shame on me.But if you should find yourself in that situation,slow WAY down, paying particularly close attention to the roads' surface,especially on turns and curves.Dave!!!
 

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In Indiana and elsewhere I imagine, early Spring always causes washouts with gravel in and around curves. I went through one of them a few years ago and made it. When I was able to pry my butt off the saddle I saw four or five riders down the hill right there. I stopped and helped them get their bikes up to the road. Harsh winters just tear the roads up. I try to ride every month. I am pretty glad I live in the city. The potholes are heck on the tires though. K
 

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In the above video,had that gentleman been paying alittle closer attention to that wet spot in the road,or had alittle more experience driving under late winter or early spring conditions, especially where that wet spot on the road was kinda in the shade,and just pulled in the clutch lever while keeping the bike as straight as possible,and just coasting over it,I believe he would have made it safely over that icy spot. That is the BIGGEST thing I watch out for NOW when riding in the late fall, winter,and early spring as it was basically the same thing that happened to me in my above post which I learned from so I do NOT do it again.But that was 42 years ago and I still ride thru the winter months, but have never gotten myself get into another predicament like that,since! I may be dumb Polock,but me no stupid Polock!! lol lol lol
 

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Julie and I were on a February ride into the foothills a couple of years ago. We were not the ride captains but shrugged when he headed west. We peeled off after about an hour at Boulder Canyon since we had to get back to our disabled son (left with his adult brother while we rode). The other two guys continued north on Peak-to-Peak highway. One of the guys hit what appeared to be water on a north-facing curve. It was ice and down he went. Spiral fracture of his right leg, lifetime rod, long recovery. He puts his bike up now from first snow to mid-May.

And the ride captain (50+ yrs of experience) takes no more rides into the foothills. Neither do we. If you don’t hit ice, you’ll hit sand. Altho we are certainly not afraid of sand, and ride thru it all winter on the flats, hitting sand on curves when you need to be secure in your line is simply dangerous.
The bicyclists scare me in Boulder Canyon
 
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In the above video,had that gentleman been paying alittle closer attention to that wet spot in the road,or had alittle more experience driving under late winter or early spring conditions, especially where that wet spot on the road was kinda in the shade,and just pulled in the clutch lever while keeping the bike as straight as possible,and just coasting over it,I believe he would have made it safely over that icy spot.
In the video, I agree that he had enough room to cross over the patch, but you could hear him panic when the bike got a little slide to it and he likely either tapped a brake or let off the gas without pulling the clutch.

I did exactly as you suggested when I hit my black ice patch ... unfortunately going straight while on the curve only worked until I ran out of road and met the curb. I turned into the curb and was able to get the front wheel to pop over it, but the back wheel then slid forward and over I went when the back wheel hit the curb at an angle. I think I did everything right when it happened but lesson learned for me ... know your route and know the conditions.
 

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One big problem with ice skating your bike is we are used to using our body to lean and the throttle and brakes to control balance. Ice requires straight forward motion with no other input from the wheels. A prayer and good insurance also helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Check out the shoes the guy is wearing in the video. Comes up right after the fall when he looks down.
 

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Back in the early 80's, I was riding my '76 DT400 Yamaha on a late February morning. It was in the upper 20's and was going to get into the upper 40's that afternoon, so I decided to ride into town. I headed up the hill from the farm and was doing around 30 mph on the snow covered gravel road. Everything was fine until I got to the peak of the hill and hit an area where the sun had been shining on the road for a bit, hitting a patch of ice that was starting to melt. The back end kicked to the right and I instinctively put my left foot down. The next thing I know, the bike is leaned to the left and I'm steering to the right, flat track style. The only thing I remember seeing was the snow bank in the left ditch coming at me quickly.

I stuck the front tire into the snow bank, throwing me into the snow. Luckily, there was about two feet of snow in the ditch which cushioned my landing. After crawling out of the snow bank and brushing myself off, I pulled my bike out of the snow bank and dug the snow out of the spokes, nooks and crannies. Instead of riding back home and putting the bike away, then driving my 4WD to town. Being young and dumb, I started it back up and continued on my way. (although more cautiously after that)
 
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