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I picked up a burgundy 2017 Roadmaster late Friday night. I had to take it back yesterday.... because it was overdue for its 500 mile service. It probably had about 630 miles on it.

I need to start with a disclaimer. My two most recent street bikes have been Goldwings; a 1500 that I put 65,000 miles on in two years and an 1800 that got 112,000 miles on it (almost all in the first 6 years) before being replaced by the Roadmaster. It is my first air-cooled twin and my first bike with foot forward controls. I am having some trouble adjusting which I believe is my fault, not the bike's.

I ride out of the Virginia City area of Nevada, and had a series of short day rides up into the Sierra Nevadas - Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Portala, Sierra City and Downieville. Virtually all the riding was on secondary roads, with a lot of mountain climbing, a few low speed switchbacks, quite a few decreasing radius turns, many blind turns with elevation and camber changes mid-turn and so very many deer. I don't think I have seen so many deer in a single weekend before.

Saturday and Sunday mornings I went out early to run errands and get a feel for the bike followed by short rides with my wife of under 150 miles to get a feel for the bike. Monday was about 200 miles.

The weather was fall-like, ranging from the low 50s up to the mid 80s. Elevations ranged from about 4,000 feet on the valley floors up to about 9,000 through a couple of passes.

Before even getting on the bike, it is easy to fall in love with the trunk and sidebag mechanics. They close nicely and securely, and they are never a problem to open again - the sidebags on the GL1800 are cable operated, and if/when the cable stretches they can be hard to open. It is also fantastic to be able to press the power button and just walk away from the bike. No headset cord to disconnect, no key to worry about getting in or out of your pocket if you are wearing gloves.

I was pleasantly surprised at how quickly the bike shifted, considering what was (for me) a very long reach to the shifter and the sensation of heavy mechanical things happening somewhere inside the transmission. That is handy, because I don't like to spend a lot of time on steep hills between gears!

There have been numerous posts here about surging, and I certainly saw a lot of that. With neutral or trailing throttle in a turn, the bike would frequently be surging slightly, and grinding in a little stop n' go traffic around Tahoe, they bike would frequently surge coming to a stop at low RPM just as I was reaching for the clutch lever. I need to retrain myself to reach for the clutch just a half second sooner in those situations. Overall, it seems like the fuel injection isn't completely sorted out - but I was amazed and impressed that you can download updates from the Indian website and apply them in the comfort of your own garage. How awesome is that?

Coming off of compression braking on downhills - a thing the bike is absolutely exceptional at! - there is a good bit of drive-line lash that provoked comment from my co-rider. I think I can work with that by combining the transition to power with some clutch feathering or a gear change.

Climbing hills required a lot more gear changes than I am used to, and I was frequently in a position where in one gear I would feel like I had more revs than I needed and the next gear dropped the RPM too low and the bike couldn't maintain whatever speed I was trying to go. A bit of retraining again - I need to be more willing to rev the engine up apparently.

Where this was really a problem was after dark. It is incredibly easy to over drive the headlights in turns, and every shadow starts to look like a deer or a horse or a cow. My headlight seems to be set too high, with the low beam showing me the tops of trees and the highbeam doing nothing productive, so I will start there.

When I picked up the bike, I was told it didn't have self-cancelling turn signals, and I was pleased to find that is not the case.

I haven't really played to much with the GPS yet - I did try to figure out how to add a favorite: if I am sitting in front of a place I want the bike to remember, how do I tell it to make the current location a favorite? I couldn't figure out waypoints, like if I want to go from Reno-Stead Airport (isn't it time for some air races?!) to Sierra City via Portola - I don't know how to do that. I wound up going to Portola, stopping, cancelling the trip, then creating a new trip to Sierra City (a great ride, by the way!), but that is not particularly convenient. No big deal here because I know the roads, but I'm not sure I know how to, say, pick a destination, then search for a place to eat along my route or near the destination. The POI database seems quite out of date, but I haven't been able to figure out if maybe my map is out of date or how to get an update.

I tried the online ride planning tool, but it suggested I take a straight line from home to Sierra City. I doubted I would even have made it over the ditch in across the street from my house, so I opted to follow roads instead.

The versatility of the infotainment system is impressive. TPMS is great as is the range-to-empty doomsday clock, the Bluetooth connectivity with my wife's phone (mine doesn't work, but I blame the phone not the bike), the ability to plug in a thumb drive full of music - all very cool. Oh! The mileage readouts? I averaged 42 MPG on this ride, about 10% better than I would have expected from the GL, and I would have needed to do math to know that.

A few things I need to work on - corner speeds. I feel very, very slow. I don't have any sort of speed sense yet with the bike, and I feel like I can't tell how much grip the tires have left which makes it hard for me to commit more lean angle. I think maybe the vibration from the engine is masking the tactile cues I am used to get a sense for how the tires are working, or maybe I don't feel balanced sitting flat on the seat with my legs forward, or maybe both. I used lots of turnouts over the weekend!

Also; parking! Not being able to use your starter motor as reverse requires a bit more planning about where to park.

I am turning in too early for many turns which I need to train myself out of. I think the Roadmaster doesn't require as much effort on the bars as the Goldwing. I have been practicing picking mid-turn and turn exit points to hit to try to get control of my cornering.

The only really disappointing thing was that after only 200-ish miles with frequent breaks both my co-rider and I were very sore and glad to be off the bike. She wants us to take a trip over to Mount Shasta and get fitted for a Day Long saddle from Russell. We routinely plan 500 mile days when we are touring, and I am not sure the gorgeous stock seat is going to work for us. Also, I was sore all through my arms - perhaps from riding a bit tensely after dark.

This week I am ordering helmets and headsets, thinking of the Seca 20S inside Shoei Neotechs.

Next week I have to go to San Francisco, and I have been debating about taking the bike. My current position is that I don't think I will: the Goldwing isn't fun in Bay Area rush hour traffic and splitting lanes, and I know that bike very well. I don't think I have enough experience on the Roadmaster to want to do that yet. I wish Captain Eddie Rickenbacker's was still open though - it would be fun to park a new Indian out front and go in and look at all the old Indians inside.

I have been impressed with the Roadmaster's willingness to stay on course despite life's little paving imperfections. I will be curious to see how it handles Dr. Botts' horrible inventions in California. Those damn things cost me a lot of head and tail light bulbs in the Goldwing, and are very slippery at low speed splitting lanes. I am sure the LED lights in the Roadmaster will fare better.

Overall, we are enjoying the bike and the scenery, but I have a lot to learn and a few things to change.
 

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I picked up a burgundy 2017 Roadmaster late Friday night. I had to take it back yesterday.... because it was overdue for its 500 mile service. It probably had about 630 miles on it.

I need to start with a disclaimer. My two most recent street bikes have been Goldwings; a 1500 that I put 65,000 miles on in two years and an 1800 that got 112,000 miles on it (almost all in the first 6 years) before being replaced by the Roadmaster. It is my first air-cooled twin and my first bike with foot forward controls. I am having some trouble adjusting which I believe is my fault, not the bike's.

I ride out of the Virginia City area of Nevada, and had a series of short day rides up into the Sierra Nevadas - Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Portala, Sierra City and Downieville. Virtually all the riding was on secondary roads, with a lot of mountain climbing, a few low speed switchbacks, quite a few decreasing radius turns, many blind turns with elevation and camber changes mid-turn and so very many deer. I don't think I have seen so many deer in a single weekend before.

Saturday and Sunday mornings I went out early to run errands and get a feel for the bike followed by short rides with my wife of under 150 miles to get a feel for the bike. Monday was about 200 miles.

The weather was fall-like, ranging from the low 50s up to the mid 80s. Elevations ranged from about 4,000 feet on the valley floors up to about 9,000 through a couple of passes.

Before even getting on the bike, it is easy to fall in love with the trunk and sidebag mechanics. They close nicely and securely, and they are never a problem to open again - the sidebags on the GL1800 are cable operated, and if/when the cable stretches they can be hard to open. It is also fantastic to be able to press the power button and just walk away from the bike. No headset cord to disconnect, no key to worry about getting in or out of your pocket if you are wearing gloves.

I was pleasantly surprised at how quickly the bike shifted, considering what was (for me) a very long reach to the shifter and the sensation of heavy mechanical things happening somewhere inside the transmission. That is handy, because I don't like to spend a lot of time on steep hills between gears!

There have been numerous posts here about surging, and I certainly saw a lot of that. With neutral or trailing throttle in a turn, the bike would frequently be surging slightly, and grinding in a little stop n' go traffic around Tahoe, they bike would frequently surge coming to a stop at low RPM just as I was reaching for the clutch lever. I need to retrain myself to reach for the clutch just a half second sooner in those situations. Overall, it seems like the fuel injection isn't completely sorted out - but I was amazed and impressed that you can download updates from the Indian website and apply them in the comfort of your own garage. How awesome is that?

Coming off of compression braking on downhills - a thing the bike is absolutely exceptional at! - there is a good bit of drive-line lash that provoked comment from my co-rider. I think I can work with that by combining the transition to power with some clutch feathering or a gear change.

Climbing hills required a lot more gear changes than I am used to, and I was frequently in a position where in one gear I would feel like I had more revs than I needed and the next gear dropped the RPM too low and the bike couldn't maintain whatever speed I was trying to go. A bit of retraining again - I need to be more willing to rev the engine up apparently.

Where this was really a problem was after dark. It is incredibly easy to over drive the headlights in turns, and every shadow starts to look like a deer or a horse or a cow. My headlight seems to be set too high, with the low beam showing me the tops of trees and the highbeam doing nothing productive, so I will start there.

When I picked up the bike, I was told it didn't have self-cancelling turn signals, and I was pleased to find that is not the case.

I haven't really played to much with the GPS yet - I did try to figure out how to add a favorite: if I am sitting in front of a place I want the bike to remember, how do I tell it to make the current location a favorite? I couldn't figure out waypoints, like if I want to go from Reno-Stead Airport (isn't it time for some air races?!) to Sierra City via Portola - I don't know how to do that. I wound up going to Portola, stopping, cancelling the trip, then creating a new trip to Sierra City (a great ride, by the way!), but that is not particularly convenient. No big deal here because I know the roads, but I'm not sure I know how to, say, pick a destination, then search for a place to eat along my route or near the destination. The POI database seems quite out of date, but I haven't been able to figure out if maybe my map is out of date or how to get an update.

I tried the online ride planning tool, but it suggested I take a straight line from home to Sierra City. I doubted I would even have made it over the ditch in across the street from my house, so I opted to follow roads instead.

The versatility of the infotainment system is impressive. TPMS is great as is the range-to-empty doomsday clock, the Bluetooth connectivity with my wife's phone (mine doesn't work, but I blame the phone not the bike), the ability to plug in a thumb drive full of music - all very cool. Oh! The mileage readouts? I averaged 42 MPG on this ride, about 10% better than I would have expected from the GL, and I would have needed to do math to know that.

A few things I need to work on - corner speeds. I feel very, very slow. I don't have any sort of speed sense yet with the bike, and I feel like I can't tell how much grip the tires have left which makes it hard for me to commit more lean angle. I think maybe the vibration from the engine is masking the tactile cues I am used to get a sense for how the tires are working, or maybe I don't feel balanced sitting flat on the seat with my legs forward, or maybe both. I used lots of turnouts over the weekend!

Also; parking! Not being able to use your starter motor as reverse requires a bit more planning about where to park.

I am turning in too early for many turns which I need to train myself out of. I think the Roadmaster doesn't require as much effort on the bars as the Goldwing. I have been practicing picking mid-turn and turn exit points to hit to try to get control of my cornering.

The only really disappointing thing was that after only 200-ish miles with frequent breaks both my co-rider and I were very sore and glad to be off the bike. She wants us to take a trip over to Mount Shasta and get fitted for a Day Long saddle from Russell. We routinely plan 500 mile days when we are touring, and I am not sure the gorgeous stock seat is going to work for us. Also, I was sore all through my arms - perhaps from riding a bit tensely after dark.

This week I am ordering helmets and headsets, thinking of the Seca 20S inside Shoei Neotechs.

Next week I have to go to San Francisco, and I have been debating about taking the bike. My current position is that I don't think I will: the Goldwing isn't fun in Bay Area rush hour traffic and splitting lanes, and I know that bike very well. I don't think I have enough experience on the Roadmaster to want to do that yet. I wish Captain Eddie Rickenbacker's was still open though - it would be fun to park a new Indian out front and go in and look at all the old Indians inside.

I have been impressed with the Roadmaster's willingness to stay on course despite life's little paving imperfections. I will be curious to see how it handles Dr. Botts' horrible inventions in California. Those damn things cost me a lot of head and tail light bulbs in the Goldwing, and are very slippery at low speed splitting lanes. I am sure the LED lights in the Roadmaster will fare better.

Overall, we are enjoying the bike and the scenery, but I have a lot to learn and a few things to change.
Winner of a write-up. A+
 

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I bought my Roadmaster in July. Got 7000 kms on it.

The initial reaction from the seat was that my 05 Goldwing was much more comfortable.

On the Goldwing, after about 2 hours, I was ready to get off as my butt was getting sore.

On the Roadmaster my butt starts to get numb after an hour or so, but after 2 or so hours it doesn't feel much worse. I seems I can go alot longer on the Roadmaster.

I'm waiting for Ultimate Seats to come our with their model to replace.

--
Gordon
 

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You had me at "I picked up a burgundy 2017 Roadmaster".
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Well, it was a long weekend ;-)
 

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Eddie Rickenbockers is still in SF only 1 Indian left on the wall. That place had the best bike collection I've ever seen.
 

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Quite the good write up. 600+ miles already? Wow. I've had my Indian for 3 months and just hit 1200. Now I really feel like a slacker. Glad you like the bike.
Hahaaa............my 2014 Chief Clkassic just hit 2100 miles this past weekend.

Happens with other bikes in garage. Only 6,808 miles on the 47 HD.

Someone here in AZ has like over 60K on their Chief already. Can't remember who
 

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Gotta love being in the Sierra Nevada's. Especially in the fall. :cool: Congrats!
 

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Eddie Rickenbockers is still in SF only 1 Indian left on the wall. That place had the best bike collection I've ever seen.
That is fantastic news!!!! Last time I went around, the owner had died and I heard that all the bikes had gone to auction (I guess most of them did) and the place was all closed up. That, the Old Ship Saloon and Schroeder's were some of my favorite places to eat in SF.

I am very glad to learn they are open again. I will try to make it out that way next week.
 
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I picked up a burgundy 2017 Roadmaster late Friday night. I had to take it back yesterday.... because it was overdue for its 500 mile service. It probably had about 630 miles on it.

I need to start with a disclaimer. My two most recent street bikes have been Goldwings; a 1500 that I put 65,000 miles on in two years and an 1800 that got 112,000 miles on it (almost all in the first 6 years) before being replaced by the Roadmaster. It is my first air-cooled twin and my first bike with foot forward controls. I am having some trouble adjusting which I believe is my fault, not the bike's.

I ride out of the Virginia City area of Nevada, and had a series of short day rides up into the Sierra Nevadas - Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Portala, Sierra City and Downieville. Virtually all the riding was on secondary roads, with a lot of mountain climbing, a few low speed switchbacks, quite a few decreasing radius turns, many blind turns with elevation and camber changes mid-turn and so very many deer. I don't think I have seen so many deer in a single weekend before.

Saturday and Sunday mornings I went out early to run errands and get a feel for the bike followed by short rides with my wife of under 150 miles to get a feel for the bike. Monday was about 200 miles.

The weather was fall-like, ranging from the low 50s up to the mid 80s. Elevations ranged from about 4,000 feet on the valley floors up to about 9,000 through a couple of passes.

Before even getting on the bike, it is easy to fall in love with the trunk and sidebag mechanics. They close nicely and securely, and they are never a problem to open again - the sidebags on the GL1800 are cable operated, and if/when the cable stretches they can be hard to open. It is also fantastic to be able to press the power button and just walk away from the bike. No headset cord to disconnect, no key to worry about getting in or out of your pocket if you are wearing gloves.

I was pleasantly surprised at how quickly the bike shifted, considering what was (for me) a very long reach to the shifter and the sensation of heavy mechanical things happening somewhere inside the transmission. That is handy, because I don't like to spend a lot of time on steep hills between gears!

There have been numerous posts here about surging, and I certainly saw a lot of that. With neutral or trailing throttle in a turn, the bike would frequently be surging slightly, and grinding in a little stop n' go traffic around Tahoe, they bike would frequently surge coming to a stop at low RPM just as I was reaching for the clutch lever. I need to retrain myself to reach for the clutch just a half second sooner in those situations. Overall, it seems like the fuel injection isn't completely sorted out - but I was amazed and impressed that you can download updates from the Indian website and apply them in the comfort of your own garage. How awesome is that?

Coming off of compression braking on downhills - a thing the bike is absolutely exceptional at! - there is a good bit of drive-line lash that provoked comment from my co-rider. I think I can work with that by combining the transition to power with some clutch feathering or a gear change.

Climbing hills required a lot more gear changes than I am used to, and I was frequently in a position where in one gear I would feel like I had more revs than I needed and the next gear dropped the RPM too low and the bike couldn't maintain whatever speed I was trying to go. A bit of retraining again - I need to be more willing to rev the engine up apparently.

Where this was really a problem was after dark. It is incredibly easy to over drive the headlights in turns, and every shadow starts to look like a deer or a horse or a cow. My headlight seems to be set too high, with the low beam showing me the tops of trees and the highbeam doing nothing productive, so I will start there.

When I picked up the bike, I was told it didn't have self-cancelling turn signals, and I was pleased to find that is not the case.

I haven't really played to much with the GPS yet - I did try to figure out how to add a favorite: if I am sitting in front of a place I want the bike to remember, how do I tell it to make the current location a favorite? I couldn't figure out waypoints, like if I want to go from Reno-Stead Airport (isn't it time for some air races?!) to Sierra City via Portola - I don't know how to do that. I wound up going to Portola, stopping, cancelling the trip, then creating a new trip to Sierra City (a great ride, by the way!), but that is not particularly convenient. No big deal here because I know the roads, but I'm not sure I know how to, say, pick a destination, then search for a place to eat along my route or near the destination. The POI database seems quite out of date, but I haven't been able to figure out if maybe my map is out of date or how to get an update.

I tried the online ride planning tool, but it suggested I take a straight line from home to Sierra City. I doubted I would even have made it over the ditch in across the street from my house, so I opted to follow roads instead.

The versatility of the infotainment system is impressive. TPMS is great as is the range-to-empty doomsday clock, the Bluetooth connectivity with my wife's phone (mine doesn't work, but I blame the phone not the bike), the ability to plug in a thumb drive full of music - all very cool. Oh! The mileage readouts? I averaged 42 MPG on this ride, about 10% better than I would have expected from the GL, and I would have needed to do math to know that.

A few things I need to work on - corner speeds. I feel very, very slow. I don't have any sort of speed sense yet with the bike, and I feel like I can't tell how much grip the tires have left which makes it hard for me to commit more lean angle. I think maybe the vibration from the engine is masking the tactile cues I am used to get a sense for how the tires are working, or maybe I don't feel balanced sitting flat on the seat with my legs forward, or maybe both. I used lots of turnouts over the weekend!

Also; parking! Not being able to use your starter motor as reverse requires a bit more planning about where to park.

I am turning in too early for many turns which I need to train myself out of. I think the Roadmaster doesn't require as much effort on the bars as the Goldwing. I have been practicing picking mid-turn and turn exit points to hit to try to get control of my cornering.

The only really disappointing thing was that after only 200-ish miles with frequent breaks both my co-rider and I were very sore and glad to be off the bike. She wants us to take a trip over to Mount Shasta and get fitted for a Day Long saddle from Russell. We routinely plan 500 mile days when we are touring, and I am not sure the gorgeous stock seat is going to work for us. Also, I was sore all through my arms - perhaps from riding a bit tensely after dark.

This week I am ordering helmets and headsets, thinking of the Seca 20S inside Shoei Neotechs.

Next week I have to go to San Francisco, and I have been debating about taking the bike. My current position is that I don't think I will: the Goldwing isn't fun in Bay Area rush hour traffic and splitting lanes, and I know that bike very well. I don't think I have enough experience on the Roadmaster to want to do that yet. I wish Captain Eddie Rickenbacker's was still open though - it would be fun to park a new Indian out front and go in and look at all the old Indians inside.

I have been impressed with the Roadmaster's willingness to stay on course despite life's little paving imperfections. I will be curious to see how it handles Dr. Botts' horrible inventions in California. Those damn things cost me a lot of head and tail light bulbs in the Goldwing, and are very slippery at low speed splitting lanes. I am sure the LED lights in the Roadmaster will fare better.

Overall, we are enjoying the bike and the scenery, but I have a lot to learn and a few things to change.
 

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Thank you very much for the comparison review between your experience with the RM and GW.
I too am a recent convert... Well kinda. I just purchased a cream/black 2017 RM, but elected to also keep my '06 Goldwing that I bought new. I have a 168 thousand on it.
I just couldn't give it up, as it feels like an old friend. My Bride have been all over our fine country on it.
I too miss the old reverse button on my equally heavy Roadmaster.

Took mine is as well for its 500 mile oil change and inspection.
However, as much of an attachment i may still have to my GW, it just doesn't have the "cool" factor of gorgeous Roadmaster!
I am very pleased with my purchase of the bike, and as i learn more about it by putting saddle time on it before the snow flies where I am in Michigan, the more i catch myself smilin' as I cruse different roads.
One thing I noticed with the RM, is it is a lot easier to perform Upturns with it.
 

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Thank you very much for the comparison review between your experience with the RM and GW.
I too am a recent convert... Well kinda. I just purchased a cream/black 2017 RM, but elected to also keep my '06 Goldwing that I bought new. I have a 168 thousand on it.
I just couldn't give it up, as it feels like an old friend. My Bride have been all over our fine country on it.
I too miss the old reverse button on my equally heavy Roadmaster.

Took mine is as well for its 500 mile oil change and inspection.
However, as much of an attachment i may still have to my GW, it just doesn't have the "cool" factor of gorgeous Roadmaster!
I am very pleased with my purchase of the bike, and as i learn more about it by putting saddle time on it before the snow flies where I am in Michigan, the more i catch myself smilin' as I cruse different roads.
One thing I noticed with the RM, is it is a lot easier to perform Upturns with it.
 

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Great write-up!

All I can say from experience (not much seat time on a GW) you don't need to worry about going in to corners and lean angle. This bike will go where you point it and will ride through the curves with ease. I am pretty aggressive in twisties and have yet to scrape anything. It's not as nimble as my Cross Country but is far more of a plush ride.

I hated the stock seat as well and have a Russell. You can't go wrong with it.
 

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Congratulations! Very nice right up!

I too picked up a new Roadmaster on Friday, but a 2016. I hit 500 miles yesterday too, but bought the oil change kit from the dealer. I experienced the surging once while engine braking to a stop light. I hope Indian addresses that issue one-of these days.

I might of sprung for a 2017, but I really like the Red and Cream color offered in 2016.

You really peak my curiously with one of your statements. You mentioned being able to obtain and install updates for your fuel injection in the comfort of your own garage. This would be for the Bosch ME17 ECU correct? How are you doing that without their Digital Wrench?

I would imagine that with the Nav system, Indian is providing a means for the user to update the maps and perhaps the audio system in general.
 

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Congratulations! Very nice right up!

I too picked up a new Roadmaster on Friday, but a 2016. I hit 500 miles yesterday too, but bought the oil change kit from the dealer. I experienced the surging once while engine braking to a stop light. I hope Indian addresses that issue one-of these days.

I might of sprung for a 2017, but I really like the Red and Cream color offered in 2016.

You really peak my curiously with one of your statements. You mentioned being able to obtain and install updates for your fuel injection in the comfort of your own garage. This would be for the Bosch ME17 ECU correct? How are you doing that without their Digital Wrench?

I would imagine that with the Nav system, Indian is providing a means for the user to update the maps and perhaps the audio system in general.
Congrats! We were looking at that bike as well, in fact it is the color and year I test rode. Beautiful machine, but when the 2017s were announced I decided I wanted the nav system.

I don't know if it works on the 2016s or not - I went here: Plan. Track. Share. Welcome to RiderX! and followed the instructions under "Updates" after I registered my VIN. It seems like you can update maps there as well, if the updates are available. They don't seem to be yet, at least for me.
 

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That was supposed to read,"U-Turns" not upturns...
Great write-up!

All I can say from experience (not much seat time on a GW) you don't need to worry about going in to corners and lean angle. This bike will go where you point it and will ride through the curves with ease. I am pretty aggressive in twisties and have yet to scrape anything. It's not as nimble as my Cross Country but is far more of a plush ride.

I hated the stock seat as well and have a Russell. You can't go wrong with it.
 

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That was supposed to read,"U-Turns" not upturns...
The seat on the Roadmaster: I don't think there is a factory motorcycle made that lets one feel just as comfortable at the end of a 200 mile plus ride as they started.
For me, I need a good rider backrest, highway pegs to stretch my legs out and instead of paying the big bucks for a custom made seat, I rely on my AirHawk.
I've found when it comes to using air inflatable cushings, less is better, meaning the less air one puts in them the better.
I've read several times from folks who buy and try a made for motorcycle air cushing like an AirHawk or a Freedom Air, etc, usually says they feel like they're sitting on an unstable bubble. That's because mist folks put too much dang air in them thinking they will be softer. Not true. Just a little works wonders and distributes ones weight more evenly.
For me, for the long haul, the 4 greatest inventions made for us long distance riders is motorcycle made air cushings, like the AirHawk, rider back rest, highway pegs and motorcycle crusecontrol.
 
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