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Figured i'd be walking into comments like this. Rode it at stock height for some time and wanted to try out lowering it. I agree there isn't a need to flat foot, but its absolutely more comfortable for me. Haven't noticed any handling issues, but i'm not riding around any tracks.
i get it mate. do i NEED to flat foot? no. Does it make it a shitload easier for me when I'm parking the bike and the road has a funky camber to it? hell yes.
appreciate the info on the shock, i was considering getting this one but given your feedback I won't - i'll wait till I change the tyres and see what that does for me first.
 

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At 5'8" I was finding the FTR ride height just a tad bit uncomfortable. I ordered the Hyperpro lowering kit and had a local tech install it.


However... after a couple rides on some less then ideal pavement... the rear is now super rigid. I don't have any experience with progressive shock springs. Is this expected? Any tricks to soften it up?



I've reached out to Hyperpro, but was hoping someone here might have some info. Thanks.
This is probably a little counter intuitive but you'll probably need to increase the spring preload. Do you have someone to help you measure the static and rider sag? (how much the rear drops under the weight of the bike and then with you sitting on it in your riding gear) this is a super important part of the process because any of other adjustment settings are no good until this is right. watch this...
The most likely reason for the "rigid" feeling is because the damping part of the shock is sitting a considerable distance into it's travel and is trying to stop you bottoming it out, or you could actually be riding on the bump stop. With the sag set correctly your ride will feel much more compliant because the damping component will be sitting in the sweet spot
As you've changed the spring the settings in the owners manual are out the window. This being said they are already a long way out. After setting my sag correctly with the help of another the preload adjusting collars are at the distance specified for a rider 20kg heavier than me.
 

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Yep you'll need to tighten up your preload for sure. I found this out the hard way about 20 years ago on a 1996 Triumph Adventurer. I took it upon myself to lower the bike by dropping the fork tubes up front through the triple trees then lower the rear by decreasing the preload. Yeah the bike sat lower under my weight but painfully found out how easily it could bottom out. Let's just call that part of my learning curve.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Thanks for the input and knowledge. I added some preload and this lightened the suspension up quit a bit. Still stiff but doesn't have a rigid bottom end. A buddy going to help me set the proper sag this weekend to tidy things up more.
 

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As always, I have to mention this book - Sportbike Suspension Tuning

Andrew covers every possible suspension adjustment on a motorcycle and what it does. He has a great teaching style and you will learn a lot about how all the adjustments interact with each other. Just like how it was counter-intuitive to increase preload in this situation because the shaft was sitting too low in the stroke.

The one thing he harps on is "You never have the perfect suspension setup, you should always be trying something new".
 
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