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Discussion Starter #1
Why arent indian and harley using hydraulic clutch actuation? Its much much better then cable and in the end is where its at! If i had one thing to do to my springfield to make it better, it would be a hydraulic clutch. My dirtbike has a magura unit, straight from the factory, is the most consistent clutch i have ever used! Tassels.....the darkhorse should come decked out in tassels to be a warhorsedarkhorse....preferably with a hydraulic clutch.
 

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I've had bikes with hydraulic clutches. In some of them there was no sense of feel as to the engagement and I often would stall the bike taking off from a stop. Others were ok though, just depends I guess. Cable clutches are easier to feel the engagement point but cables do fail occasionally.
 

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A trip to the top of Pikes Peak had me appreciating my cable actuated clutch on my Roadmaster a couple of years ago when my pal's hydraulic clutch on his Harley failed due to the atmospheric change. My take-away, is that a hydraulic clutch requires more maintenance and offers a bit more potential for problems. Cable clutch requires routine inspections and occasional lube.
 

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I feel the cable clutch is a MUCH better option than hydraulic. As others have stated, you get much better feel with cable, and there is the ability to adjust more. Also it’s one less thing to start leaking with age.
 

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One benefit to a cable clutch...if you have a cable break, that can be repaired on the road (I carry a cable repair kit). If your hydraulic clutch goes out, you’re stuck. I like the feel and easy pull on my cable clutch better than the hydraulic clutch on my prior HD. I can also adjust my cable clutch, which cant be done on a hydraulic unit.
 

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Both designs have inherit drawbacks.

Cable clutch: Cables breaking, need adjustment, both those issues can be eliminated or minimized with routine maintenance.
Hydraulic Clutch: Fluid needs replacing just like brakes, (Hygroscopic absorbs water), difficult to feel friction zone (On/Off) behavior.

Cable clutches have a better fell and are easier to manipulate in slow speed maneuvering. But many can get use to Hydraulic clutches as well.
 

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My 2018 FLHTK has the hydraulic clutch and my other bikes are cable. I haven't made up my mind about which one I prefer...time will tell. There's certainly a difference in the feel of them. As others have stated, each has advantages and disadvantages.
 

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I had a 2013 Harley CVO Road King with the hydraulic clutch and I did not really care for it. It was not a bit easier to pull or use. There was a couple of recalls on it and it was the one thing that left me on the side of the road when I had the bike. Then when I traded it in it was yet again having clutch issues. Cables are much simpler.
 

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I just traded my 17 Eletraglide Police bike for a new 18 Chieftain I am also a Motor officer one of the big advantage in my opinion was that the Indian had a manual clutch with feel my last three Harleys had Hydraulic and I do not like that their set up had very little feel have had dirt bikes with great hydraulic clutches but never cared for Harley's set up
 

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And why not better a change without using the clutch? Many brands have had it for a long time.
Sorry for the English of Google translator :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A trip to the top of Pikes Peak had me appreciating my cable actuated clutch on my Roadmaster a couple of years ago when my pal's hydraulic clutch on his Harley failed due to the atmospheric change. My take-away, is that a hydraulic clutch requires more maintenance and offers a bit more potential for problems. Cable clutch requires routine inspections and occasional lube.
I use hydraulic clutches in mx, much more durable and have a better feel. Engine heat on the cable can make them sloppy. Most hydraulic clutches are also adjustable at the mastercylinder. It seems maybe cruisers are behind the times on this. I wont even ride another cable clutch in mx.
 

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A trip to the top of Pikes Peak had me appreciating my cable actuated clutch on my Roadmaster a couple of years ago when my pal's hydraulic clutch on his Harley failed due to the atmospheric change. My take-away, is that a hydraulic clutch requires more maintenance and offers a bit more potential for problems. Cable clutch requires routine inspections and occasional lube.
Sometimes it's not about the hydraulic clutch, and more about who makes it. Was on a bike tour of the Alps this past August and there were 6 BMWs and two H-D Electra-Glides. All bikes had Hydraulic clutches. Both H-D's failed on the same mountain Pass near the Dolomites and all the rest of the bikes were just fine...
 
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I think there were some kits to change over on Victories but not sure if anything for Indians yet
There were kits available, or you could assemble the parts and do it yourself. Having said that, there may be some issues with going hydraulic on the TS111. On the Vics, the shifter rod was on the top of the gear set/primary. On the Indian's, it's on the bottom. Not an insurmountable problem, but would take some creativity to make it work and not take away ground clearance.
 

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That new Challenger has added the slipper clutch set-up to make it easier to pull. I believe the FTR is slip and assist...
 
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