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Hi Murr, no I haven't ridden one and have never had the inclination to do so. In heavy traffic lane/splitting etc. nimble it is not. The figures alone state this. A quick look at the figures available reveals the kerb weight dry to be over 700lbs on the older models (2020 kerb weight figures were N/A on the sheet I stumbled across at a quick glance) and the wheelbase to be 1677mm, the handlebars are 5 inches wider than those on the FTR.

Things may be different over there, Triumphs are great bikes no shadow of a doubt and I've had them and loved them. I bought one of the first Tridents when the property developer John Bloor bought the name (he had to change the logo) and started knocking out Trumpets back in the very late 80s early 90s. I then switched to their flagship the Daytona Super III in 1993 and then a black standard 900 Daytona in 1995 which I kept for 17 years. I bought then as they were a 'little out of the box' unusual and at the time rarely seen. This is the exact same reasoning I bought the FTR and my CVO 110 Breakout.

Triumphs are built here and are invariably now as common as muck over here. A mate of mine has just bought a Bobber locally and was lucky to get it out of the showroom before the dealership went under two weeks ago. He now needs to travel some considerable distance for his servicing needs. My Indian dealership is two miles from my house.....All mitigating factors for me why I am currently happy with my life choices together with the fact they both run great and tick all my boxes! I have no inclination or desire to ride anything else but what lies in my garage. Once again good luck when you sell and move on.
 

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I own both.
The biggest thing to first take into account is body posture. Do you like the more standard posture? Or the more balls in the breeze cruiser posture. That is consideration #1.
#2 . determine your commute.
How bumpy are the routes roads? how much rain? all that jive.
The worst or unpredictable or more adverse the commute, the better suited the FTR will be.

The FTR you know, your on a performance oriented bike.

The Scout you know your on a couch, (until you hit a bump that reminds you of its 3 inch suspension travel) and then you realize your on a bike with no suspension travel.


Tires? Ya, they are not the worst. In fact they aren't that bad for commuting. Until on grooves, then they get funky and wormy..
The kenda tires that came on Scout in early days were by far the WORST tires EVER.. I thought the FTR tire would take that title, but I was surprised by that not being the case. But honestly, I never have faith in stock tires anyways and nor should anyone else. They are usually old, and most often ARE NOT THE SAME TIRE ONE CAN BUY OFF THE SHELF, Even if they are the same brand and model! (Look into it y'all)

The Scout has zero vibes in the seat.
The FTR does. Not terribly. But goes back to, your being on a bike with an engine designed more for GTFO. The Scout is more docile and buttery. Yet Still fast.

Now, there IS a running issue..
If your FTR doesn't run right, that 10/15 extra minutes of warming it up every morning to insure it will stay running in its stock form can be a knock for a commuter bike. It was for me..
After market tune rectifies that but it's note worthy.
My scout stock, and even after a a big bore Kit and all its surrounding required supporting mods. There is ZERO difference if I start it and ride off before the check lights go off, when it 40f or 100f outside,, or if I warm it up.. it behaves exactly the same no matter what, smooth, predictable, reliable and is like clockwork. (Like most modern machines usually are, and definitely should be)

On the the expressway, the FTR with its more "aggressive" posture is better than the Scout stock. Your a parachute on the Scout and the wind wants to roll your head off your shoulders and down the rear fender.
I fixed that with giving my upper body more lean in To the wind so I'm not a parachute, and achieved buoyancy in the wind.. (I'm Pro "wind Judo" and Anti "hide from it" behind windshields)

If all things were perfect, I'd take the FTR because it's a more capable and flexible tool, with more conveniences, and more tools to deal with adversaries found on commutes like weather and conditions.
But things aren't perfect. So it's very hard for me to say even as an owner of both.

It's important to note this unforeseen.
people look at me on the FTR and give thumbs up all the time.. but on the Scout, people try to stop me and talk to me all the time.. so the Scout makes up for lost time of the stock FTRs warm up regime at so many gas stations or stop light.. I can't recommend the Scout for a constrained schedule, it's really seriously a hindrance at times it's that prevalent. I've had to blow off far to many folks that just want to talk about it that I start to feel like a dick when I just wave and ride off as their walking up because I'm running on a finite schedule.
Ride them both. Flip a coin. That's the best advice I could give as an owner of both...

They are both awesome bikes. And besides the running issues many have brought up with FTR having to rectify with a tune, neither will be something you feel bad about..

Which makes me think I need to edit my final advice..

My final answer to your question is,

Yes......
 

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Rider
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Hi Murr, no I haven't ridden one and have never had the inclination to do so. In heavy traffic lane/splitting etc. nimble it is not. The figures alone state this. A quick look at the figures available reveals the kerb weight dry to be over 700lbs on the older models (2020 kerb weight figures were N/A on the sheet I stumbled across at a quick glance) and the wheelbase to be 1677mm, the handlebars are 5 inches wider than those on the FTR.

Things may be different over there, Triumphs are great bikes no shadow of a doubt and I've had them and loved them. I bought one of the first Tridents when the property developer John Bloor bought the name (he had to change the logo) and started knocking out Trumpets back in the very late 80s early 90s. I then switched to their flagship the Daytona Super III in 1993 and then a black standard 900 Daytona IN 1995 which I kept for 17 years. I bought then as they were a 'little out of the box' unusual and at the time rarely seen. This is the exact same reasoning I bought the FTR and my CVO 110 Breakout.

Triumphs are built here and are invariably now as common as muck over here. A mate of mine has just bought a Bobber locally and was lucky to get it out of the showroom before the dealership went under two weeks ago. He now needs to travel some considerable distance for his servicing needs. My Indian dealership is two miles from my house.....All mitigating factors for me why I am currently happy with my life choices together with the fact they both run great and tick all my boxes! I have no inclination or desire to ride anything else but what lies in my garage. Once again good luck when you sell and move on.
The 900 cc triple they made was a great engine.
 

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Rider
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Bulletproof they were and at the time with the 120 degree offset on the crank crack open the throttle and she'd be away in any gear. I messed with that too and had the Dynojet treatment. Rejetted, rolling road, three K & N conical filters and a small fourth one for the crank breather. Looked wicked. Nevertheless had to rethink later and refit the airbox with a K & N screen filter as first time the temperature dropped below 53.6 in your money my friggin' fuel started freezing and she ran like a bag of spanners. Great times and as stated great bikes. Super IIIs are now fetching the same money as they were sold at if they're in top condition. Appreciating classic if you've got one and the time to hold onto it?
 

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Rider
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697 Posts
Bulletproof they were and at the time with the 120 degree offset on the crank crack open the throttle and she'd be away in any gear. I messed with that too and had the Dynojet treatment. Rejetted, rolling road, three K & N conical filters and a small fourth one for the crank breather. Looked wicked. Nevertheless had to rethink later and refit the airbox with a K & N screen filter as first time the temperature dropped below 53.6 in your money my friggin' fuel started freezing and she ran like a bag of spanners. Great times and as stated great bikes. Super IIIs are now fetching the same money as they were sold at if they're in top condition. Appreciating classic if you've got one and the time to hold onto it?
No, I was too stupid and let that ship sail...
 

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Perhaps surprisingly the 900 Daytona fairing included only weighed 40lbs more than an FTR.
 

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I had the cruiser-ish 1996 Triumph Adventurer 900 (885cc). I enjoyed it right up until a kid driving his grandma's car rear ended me and totaled it. It was a gold & ivory two tone replicating a 1960's Bonneville paint scheme. The bike definitely had some power and the triple sounded cool as hell.
 

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The FTR is a piece of shit as a commuter without an aftermarket tune. Even then, it's buggy. Yo-yoing down the street like a see-saw... occasional kick in the ass as it tries to save itself from stalling, and stalling at idle at traffic lights which is dangerous as you are about to turn left in front of oncoming traffic. On the bright side, it handles great! The ergonomics for me are excellent. The stock tires aren't too bad, unless you are riding on grooved pavement when they feel squirrely as hell, but still safe. I'm in the process of testing new tunes these days, getting it to be the bike that Indian should have made. Not holding my breath though. I'm going to sell it soon. 1200 miles. If you haven't got an FTR yet, don't get one!
Dude, here you are on every thread...whinning and complaining. Im starting to think you actually don't own a FTR and are just trolling. If you actually own the bike-- sell it and be gone.
 

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I was thinking street tires would make it handle better.
Is it more comfortable than a scout?
I commute on it. It's not the best commuter for the following reasons:
1. Small tank. Getting about 150 before I need to fill up.
2. Hot seat. Literally, seat gets really hot.

If you can get over those two things, then it's pretty good. High seat gives you a good commanding field of view. Powerful engine, you can overtake just about anything on the road and that means you are always ahead of traffic. Great brakes and handling, so lane splitting and weaving through traffic no issues.


So if you compare against a scout, the FTR is a much better commuter. The scout sits to low and in heavy commuter track, its a poor choice.

Now the Ducati Scrambler (no hot seat and better gas mileage) and Ducati Hypermotard make better commuters. I know, as I've had both those bikes and commuted on them in the Bay Area daily for several years. But if you are sticking with Indian, then yes, the FTR makes a better commuter than the scout IMHO
 

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Rider
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I commute on it. It's not the best commuter for the following reasons:
1. Small tank. Getting about 150 before I need to fill up.
2. Hot seat. Literally, seat gets really hot.

If you can get over those two things, then it's pretty good. High seat gives you a good commanding field of view. Powerful engine, you can overtake just about anything on the road and that means you are always ahead of traffic. Great brakes and handling, so lane splitting and weaving through traffic no issues.


So if you compare against a scout, the FTR is a much better commuter. The scout sits to low and in heavy commuter track, its a poor choice.

Now the Ducati Scrambler (no hot seat and better gas mileage) and Ducati Hypermotard make better commuters. I know, as I've had both those bikes and commuted on them in the Bay Area daily for several years. But if you are sticking with Indian, then yes, the FTR makes a better commuter than the scout IMHO
That's great mileage, well done.
 

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Okay okay.. the tuning issues that I wish the FTR didn't have are going to get worked out, and I will love my FTR again. There's nothing else I don't like about it. It's fine for commuting. I'm just gonna go riding today.
That's great mileage, well done.
I wish I can squeeze more out of it. But generally 130-150 is what I am getting.
 

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Dude, here you are on every thread...whinning and complaining. Im starting to think you actually don't own a FTR and are just trolling. If you actually own the bike-- sell it and be gone.
Sorry if I'm hitting a nerve. I just want the FTR to be better so that I don't want to get rid of it. The coming week or two should hold some promise.
 

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Well then, QUIT POSTING FOR TWO WEEKS, you ass clown.

I LOVER MY FTR, but I have brains enough to sort it out. You apparently are just a whiner that shouldn't be allowed to own a motorcycle.
You probably should calm down mate. Nobody is here for that kinda shit. Maybe the Mods need to step in. 🤔
 

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I found mine to be a little harsh in the suspension department with factory settings. I checked the spring rate for my weight and it’s pretty spot on. I have done some minor adjustments to the damping and compression on the rear shock. I found it was over dampened and was kicking me in the ass over bumps. Plus I backed off the compression and the rebound on the front. It’s now very compliant. Soaks up mostly everything you can throw at it and is still stiff enough to handle fast paced riding. I think once you dial in the suspenders regardless of your state of tune at this point, I think you’ll find it quite a pleasure to commute on. Mind you, getting the tune sorted I’m in no doubt will double that pleasure. 👍😎🇦🇺
 

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The FTR is a piece of shit as a commuter without an aftermarket tune. Even then, it's buggy. Yo-yoing down the street like a see-saw... occasional kick in the ass as it tries to save itself from stalling, and stalling at idle at traffic lights which is dangerous as you are about to turn left in front of oncoming traffic...
Not my experience with mine. It does have the latest factory tune.
 

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Sorry if I'm hitting a nerve. I just want the FTR to be better so that I don't want to get rid of it. The coming week or two should hold some promise.

Dude-- it's all good. I get it, you got Lemon. It happens. But you have a whole thread dedicated to you and your bike. My recommendation is keep your issues solely on that thread.
 
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