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Yes, and when it is hot, something expands to cause that condition to happen.
Had a similar issue years ago with one of my vehicles. Problem with the alternator which only showed up after the temperature raised to a certain level. Hink’s issue brought back memories of chasing down those gremlins.
 

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This past Saturday we had one of our members (2020RM Elite) drop out of formation on the interstate and head for the shoulder. Me being the tail gunner, I followed him to see what was up. The group was in steady contact so they knew what was going on. He said the bike essentially started to sputter and lost power. It would restart but idled like crap. The code P0314 and engine light came on. We tried restarting until the tow got to us (spoken with French accent...2 hours later). No joy. It kept doing the same thing. We were doing 75 to 80 in the left most lane. It was hot though, mid-90s. It's at the shop now. It sounded like bad gas and he was down about half a tank. But could also be ignition. Checked the battery connections. All were tight. I told him it would run fine for the dealer tech...lol. I'll feedback what they say about it once I know.

Interestingly we saw no law enforcement on either side of the road going by and no VDOT emergency trucks.

Update: Broken valve spring is the culprit.. This was on a 116 engine from the factory. I hope that this is not a trend. Possibly we'll know more next week when it gets worked on.
 

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This past Saturday we had one of our members (2020RM Elite) drop out of formation on the interstate and head for the shoulder. Me being the tail gunner, I followed him to see what was up. The group was in steady contact so they knew what was going on. He said the bike essentially started to sputter and lost power. It would restart but idled like crap. The code P0314 and engine light came on. We tried restarting until the tow got to us (spoken with French accent...2 hours later). No joy. It kept doing the same thing. We were doing 75 to 80 in the left most lane. It was hot though, mid-90s. It's at the shop now. It sounded like bad gas and he was down about half a tank. But could also be ignition. Checked the battery connections. All were tight. I told him it would run fine for the dealer tech...lol. I'll feedback what they say about it once I know.

Interestingly we saw no law enforcement on either side of the road going by and no VDOT emergency trucks.


The P0314 code is a cylinder misfire code and is commonly associated with bad plug wires (arcing to the frame or heads) loose spark plugs and leaky exhaust flange bolts.
 

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Yeah, that code is also non-determinate on which cylinder was misfiring. We didn't see any other codes.. The bike has less than 6000 miles on it. He wasn't happy. A few months ago the battery internally shorted out and left him on the road. He's got a squeaky belt that's been worked on multiple times and not much joy there. He also has an FTR so he has at least one running bike.
 

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Years ago I owned a yellow 1970 Opel GT. While taking a trip from Erie, PA to Pittsburgh the car simply died. After sitting stranded (pre-cell phone days) on the side of I-79 for 30 minutes at night I decided to try to restart. It fired right up. It ran for another 15-20 miles then died again. Same thing over and over until I finally limped home. I took it to the Buick Dealership (Opel was sold in the US through Buick) and they diagnosed a bad ignition coil. When the coil got hot it stopped working. When it cooled it worked again for a little while until it got hot again and would fail. After replacing the coil the car ran great until I sold the car. (That is one vehicle I wish I still owned!)
That's ironic - I had a 1974 Opel Manta - similar issue only different. Turned out to be the condenser: it would run fine cold, then progressively worse as it warmed up... to the point I could barely get it to the next parking lot. That took some head scratching, I assure you (I drove mine in the 90's when there were no dealerships to help). Those Belgium-made Opels really were great cars though for the time. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hink is your bike completely stock ?
Yep.

When I took the bike in yday the writeup guy (usually very good) said there are two sides to this type of issue: electrical and fuel. We hit some massive, sharp potholes on Vail Pass and the electricity stayed on — no apparent break in the circuitry. This argued “fuel.” Gideon suspected it may be a bad fuel pump ~~ a strong one will work thru partially-vaporized fuel but a weak one cannot. The fact that this was clearly heat-sensitive tended to confirm this hypothesis ( although the ignition coil theory may also be valid here).

Re the October code reflash, he said my bike should have the latest reflashes, but he will doublecheck.

Stay tuned.
 

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Sorry to hear about your new bike woes. If you ever get in a jam up in the Vail Valley give me a shout. I live here and can certainly help. Although I can't do much about the roads. I rode down to Leadville and came back up over Vail Pass las week and I-70 requires full attention. The bridge bumps will nearly launch you.

As a warning to others that may be traveling the Colorado High Country, watch the road conditions. Road crews do repairs during the summer. Winter is very tough on roads up here.

Good luck with the repairs. Breakdowns in the middle of nowhere can be more than just an inconvenience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I-70 requires full attention. The bridge bumps will nearly launch you.

As a warning to others that may be traveling the Colorado High Country, watch the road conditions. Road crews do repairs during the summer. Winter is very tough on roads up here.
Julie and I took the off-ramp e/b at the rest stop at the top of Vail Pass to gear up. No lighting of course. I hit a tank trap that was literally two feet deep and three feet long — completely unmarked, of course, and we were downshifting and all I could see was the lip. She saw my ass go flying three feet in the air, then my headlight and me go flying up as my bike hit the front end. The windshield literally hit my helmet. Somehow my instincts kicked in (50 years of riding) and I splayed my legs out and landed without dumping it. Julie was amazed that I kept things upright.

No cracked frame. No broken windshield. And most importantly, no injuries.

Our guardian angel was with us.

And that‘s also how I know it wasn’t a loose wire or connection.

No more night rides on Vail Pass. Period. Construction (repairs) are scheduled until October.
 

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Julie and I hopped on our new Roadmasters for our annual Flyin to Zion road trip ~~ 600mi for dinner in Springdale. Friday we rode over Independence Pass and thru Aspen. It was 97 degrees and we hit stop-and-go traffic all the way thru town, then intermittently to Glenwood Springs. When we got within two blocks of our hotel, my bike sputtered and died. It would restart, but as soon as I tried to (gently) engage the clutch, it would immediately stall. So we gently pushed it to the curb and called my dealer (Indian of Denver). They said to open the gas cap and that it might be a heat sensor. No codes were thrown.

The next morning things were fine. Off we went, across the desert in hi-90’s temps. A bit of slow-moving traffic as we went thru Zion Natl Park but no stoppages until we almost got to the motel. Then it sputtered and died.

Yesterday we hopped on the bikes for what should have been a routine (albeit long) ride home. Thru Escalante Plateau, past Bryce and thru Capitol Reef NP’s, all good. We hit open riding headed for Hanksville as temps rose, turned to head towards Green River, and had wide-open roads. Cruising speed 80, passes at 90. Air temp was around 100. We went to pass a couple of boat-towing trucks and an RV, and as I rolled on the engine caught, sputtered, and died. Very dangerous mid-pass. Down-shifting and releasing the clutch did not help.

Luckily the trucks recognized our dilemma and let us in. We cruised to a stop. We let the bike sit and cool down. It started right up but four times between there and Green River it would do the same thing, even tho I was babying the bike and not getting past 75mph. My brother (following on a Gold Wing) saw that every time this happened, my tail lights would go off as I lost power, then come back on as I clutched in. This indicated potential electrical issues. I learned that if I immediately downshifted to fifth gear, it would flutter but sometimes smooth out, and if not I could shift to 6th and sometimes that would smooth it out. We decided to get as close to Denver as possible so I could trailer it back.

When we hit the cooler mountain air near Debeque (refueling stop), it seemed to cure the problem. No further problems going home.

  • Julie’s bike was a rock star. Same engine, zero problems ( RM Darkhorse).
  • my old RM made the same trip every year with zero problems. Last summer I went Vegas in 115 degree temps, with bumper-to-bumper traffic to get to my hotel, and zero problems.

Frustrating. Tomorrow of course I’m off to the dealership. Will post results when I get them. From re-reading posts, I’m going to ask for a new battery and also to check the ground. Other possibilities may be a defective heat or oxygen sensor? (although I think that would throw a code). Stand by for results and in the interim other thoughts welcome.

I have got to have a reliable bike ~~ all weather, year-round.
I agree with the other suggestions. I think its your battery or a 10 Amp circuit breaker failing.
 

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Geez, Hink! Glad you and Julie are still with us. I'm very leery these days riding at night for just that reason. Riding a heavily tree lined road with the shadows is just as bad. I ran over a speed bump at speed (25-30) as I forgot it was there and it was in the shadows. Stay safe out there.
 

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Julie and I took the off-ramp e/b at the rest stop at the top of Vail Pass to gear up. No lighting of course. I hit a tank trap that was literally two feet deep and three feet long — completely unmarked, of course, and we were downshifting and all I could see was the lip. She saw my ass go flying three feet in the air, then my headlight and me go flying up as my bike hit the front end. The windshield literally hit my helmet. Somehow my instincts kicked in (50 years of riding) and I splayed my legs out and landed without dumping it. Julie was amazed that I kept things upright.

No cracked frame. No broken windshield. And most importantly, no injuries.

Our guardian angel was with us.

And that‘s also how I know it wasn’t a loose wire or connection.

No more night rides on Vail Pass. Period. Construction (repairs) are scheduled until October.

Your lucky you didn't destroy the rims of the bike, tons of Challenger riders posting pictures of destroyed rims due to hitting potholes on Facebook. They must be hitting them pretty fast, but these cast wheels are easily damaged.
 

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I was riding South Georgia late in the evening and the OEM headlights in the Chieftain just did not provide enough light. I learned quickly to not drive faster than your headlights can see right after I went into a turn that was MUCH more sharp than it looked. Last year, I upgraded to LED's;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I told Julie that the worst possible answer would be,

We can’t replicate what happened.”

Guess what? They couldn’t. Of course their techs aren’t going to cruise 80 mph in 100+ temps w 90 mph passes (even tho Julie’s bike did these perfectly — just shrugged and rolled on).

What they did do was replace the fuel pump. It’s their best guess.

Test coming this weekend. Stand by for results
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 · (Edited)
And of course the question is, “How can you have a bad fuel pump on a brand-new bike?” The answer from the service guys is “bad components.” I’m not the first guy (sadly). Not common and most guys don’t ride em like I do, I guess. The bright spot is that Julie’s bike was spectacular - - not even a hint of this. Kind of ruins the vibe with a new bike tho… I hopped on G-go (my old RM) and rode him for 90k mi with zero problems…. Sigh… “Progress.”
 

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Fuel pumps are designed to be cooled by the gas. If you ran for a bit on low fuel at high speeds it could have been damaged. Good luck, regardless. Ride safe.
 

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Hope it works out for ya, but if I see you on the side of the road, I'll stop and see what I can do.
 
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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I am skeptical, but hopeful. The other thing that was messed up was the music on my Ride Command. My bluetooth would freeze up and go offline, my hardwire connection USB ditto. Indian of Denver assured me they have cured this with the latest reflash.
 

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And of course the question is, “How can you have a bad fuel pump on a brand-new bike?” The answer from the service guys is “bad components.” I’m not the first guy (sadly). Not common and most guys don’t ride em like I do, I guess. The bright spot is that Julie’s bike was spectacular - - not even a hint of this. Kind of ruins the vibe with a new bike tho… I hopped on G-go (my old RM) and rode him for 90k mi with zero problems…. Sigh… “Progress.”
You would be surprised how much of that happens on new corporate jets! When you think about it this is not surprising. That many new components that have to play nice together. Going after the fuel pump makes sense. Weak pressure will rear its ugly head on hot days and being you are not getting any codes. Dean
 
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