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Discussion Starter #1
I went to a meeting of my woodturning club last night and an older club member was sitting in the back row. He looked up when I sat down and saw that I had an Indian hat on. He said "Do you have an Indian?". One on order I replied. He got the biggest smile on his face and said "The Police used to have Indians. That motorcycle was something else. That was before the war." After that he seemed to go back to where ever he was before he said anything. I thought it an interesting exchange after so many years.
 

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I know what you mean, have had a few conversations with older gents about Indians!! :)
 

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Howdy Folks,
While I was traveling this summer I stopped in a small farming town southwest of Wichita Falls to grab a cold drink at the Dairy Queen. An older gentleman, in his 80's I'd guess, was sitting a couple of booths away with his wife. He was pointing at my bike and asking her, "Is that an Indian, Mother?"

As I got up to leave he hopped up out of his seat and stopped me, asking, "Would you like to hear my Indian story?", and I said, "Why, sure."

The old gent told me, "In 1948 I had a buddy whose dad had a service station and car lot in Slaton over by Lubbock. I stopped in one day and they had a big red Indian Chief sitting there. My buddy asked if I'd like to take it for a ride, and I said sure. I kicked her over, he got on behind, and we took off down the dirt road. About a mile away I ran into a bunch of loose sand and that big old bike started fish-tailing. I barely get her stopped without dumping it. I got off and told my buddy, if you ride this thing back I'll buy you a Coca-Cola, and he did. That was the last time I ever rode a motorcycle."

He seemed very pleased with his story. His wife was rolling her eyes and shaking her head. I thanked him for sharing and got back on the road. I guess some folks scare easier than others...
--- Randall
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Back then there were so few motorcycles around that he really was a "Wild One" to take an Indian for a ride.
 

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My dad told me the story of his motorcycle ride. Seems he worked at a gas station before the war and became friends with a buddy who rode an Indian. Well one day his friend asked him if he wanted to take the Indian for a ride. My dad said sure and not knowing or forgetting what to do proceeded to start out panicked and grabbed the front brake and went right over the handlebars. Was the last time he rode a bike until the 80's when he bought a moped and went from there. He always regretted never starting to ride until he was in his 60's. He did have fun though and rode the subsequent bikes he bought all over the countryside until his late 70's. R.I.P. dad
 

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Here's my Indian story. I had this huge crush on a girl when I was a freshman. Well my buddies and I are up at my friend craigs house to play football on a nice Saturday afternoon. Christine lived across the street so I went to visit her. She took me out to the garage to introduce me to her older brother. He was trying to start his late 40's Indian Roadmaster/Chieftain I am guessing by the size. Anyway he's getting frustrated with it not starting and say's I'll sell it to you for 25 bucks. Mind you this is 196 and I am 14 at the time, needless to say I didn't buy it or even think about buying it, I mean it was huge, besides Christine looked smoking hot that day and I didn't think about the Indian again until I got home. I told my dad at the dinner table and he said " You didn't buy it" Christine's brother traded it for Triumph Bonneville, way cooler in my book then
 

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There's nothing more satisfying than sitting down with a few older gentleman (70's and up) and listening to their stories. As my father said when I was a young child, listen and respect your elders, they've been where your going. Now in my mid 50's, that statement is so true. It's nice to see and read all your personal stories of days gone by from some ol' pap..Time was much simpler back then. As you go riding your Indians, take the time to smell the roses, and if you see an older gentlemen admiring you steed, strike up a conversation, you may be supprised what your gonna here. Now, it's our time to make the stories and one day tell your stories to you grandchildren of the day when Indian came back to life, after so many years. You are all making history now!!! Enjoy...
Remember, Life is a Journey, So Enjoy the Ride!
Sorry for the ranting
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My father was a Harley guy and never hesitated when I was old enough to ride. Catch was I had to be able to kick it. Kicking over a Harley when you aren't the biggest guy takes some creativity. Determination won out and a lifetime of riding began. As far as old guy stories I would never be able to get away with what the group he rode with pulled off. Both the riding and partying were hard core. Those days are gone but the history and stories carry on. The call to be "In the Wind" is as strong as ever. This may be my last motorcycle or close to it. I am happy I didn't buy the aluminum siding and will enjoy the new Indian and the friends and experiences that come with it.
 
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