Indian Motorcycle Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of MAY's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello Everyone,

Like the Custom Scout Thread, I thought it would be a good idea to start a separate thread devoted to the discussion of the High Performance (Street)
and Competition (Track) potential of the new 2015 Indian Scout and the potential Scout-Variants that may likely follow it into the future.

Just what is the "Spirit Of The Scout"?


P1010081.JPG


I am just an obscure reflection on that door.
Pondering what kind of future lies behind that door.

"Balance of Power and Control"
"Power and Control"
"Power and Performance Handling"

Seems to me that those concepts are applicable to not only the New 2015 Indian Scout, but
hints of the fundamental design criteria for all the Scout models and other models that will follow it.
It inspires visions of World Class Super Bikes, World Class Cafe Racers, World Class Dual-Sport/Adventure bikes.
Any bike having to do with either sports and utility or combined "Sport/Utility Bike (SUB).

The new Scout's incredibly versatile Modular Component Architecture, simply demands new configurations to be
added to the line.
Entry Level Models to Premium High Performance Models.
I have visions. Since it's unveiling, the Scout has been inspiring a lot of ideas. I am, no doubt, alone inspired by this bike.

Some potential future power plants examples

Entry-Level Street, Dual Sport/Adventure - Tactical Reconnaissance applications.
9cid (141.6cc) Single Cyl. (light)
18cid (283.25cc) Single Cyl. (medium)
35cid (566.5cc) Single Cyl. (heavy)


Think of the historical Indian Scouts and their model name incarnations:
Scout, 101 Scout, Jr Scout, Sport Scout and Super Scout
Also, there were:
Prince, Arrow, Warrior and Warrior TT
And let us not forget the Indian 4 and 841.

These are all historic model names of bikes that truly existed. Names that can be revived.
Polaris happens to own Brammo (an electric motorcycle co), I think Polaris should, a some point develop a hybrid
fuel/electric bike to extend range and thus fuel economy -possibly with duel mode option ala gas or electric or both -
this line could then be marketed through the Indian/Victory/Polaris dealer network under the Indian Brand.


"High Performance" can be applied not only to an engine (Power), or a chassis/suspension (Handling) consist, but also to include
other notions of "High Performance" such as "high performance fuel economy" where the race isn't how fast you can go but
how far on a gallon of gas. - (Honda is proud of their product's optimal fuel consumption qualities and are not afraid to publish them)

For now, I just thought this would be a good thread to focus on High Performance in the vein of it's traditional sense.
The Scout has a High Performance quality to it - it can only get better from here.

With all that said, to me, there is a lot more to the Scout than meets the eye.

I thought about the word "Scout" and recalled that Scouts are pretty much forward reconnaissance soldiers ahead of the army on the battlefield.

Wikipedia defines the military definition of Reconnaissance as follows:

"Reconnaissance is the military term for exploring beyond the area occupied by friendly forces to gain vital information about enemy forces or features of the environment for later analysis and/or dissemination. Battalions, regiments, or brigades that conduct reconnaissance have undergone rigorous selection processes and their training is very much to do with that field, for example they must undergo capture or kill evasion, resist, evacuate and extract, and resistance to torture, sniper rifle training, etc. Snipers are selected as a first choice when recruiting for organisations like the Special Reconnaissance Regiment (SRR); they are given precedence due to their skill and knowledge at evading enemies and capture; they are considered great assets in reconnaissance. " - Reconnaissance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

When I consider the name consist: Indian + Scout (Indian Scout) I am reminded of my Native American Indian heritage and those among them who served as Scouts,
including those who served as US Army Indian Scouts.

US Army Indian Scouts
"Native Americans have made up an integral part of U.S. military conflicts since America's beginning. Colonists recruited Indian allies during such instances as the Pequot War from 1634–1638, the Revolutionary War, as well as in War of 1812. Native Americans also fought on both sides during the American Civil War, as well as military missions abroad including the most notable, the Codetalkers who served in World War II. The Scouts were active in the American West in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Including those who accompanied General John J. Pershing in 1916 on his expedition to Mexico in pursuit of Pancho Villa. Indian Scouts were officially deactivated in 1947 when their last member retired from the Army at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.[SUP][1][/SUP] For many Indians it was an important form of interaction with white American culture and society their first major encounter with the whites’ way of thinking and doing things.[SUP][2][/SUP] "- United States Army Indian Scouts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I encourage the reader to ponder the definition of Scout as being such that the Indian Motorcycle Co. Scout's purpose is "Forward Looking and Progressive" possessing
that legendary balance of "Power and Control" and citing the obvious tactical description, provided above, describes a motorcycle's commercial function as that
of a product that can be commercially deployed against any and all competitive products, Foreign and Domestic and adapt to it's competitor's environment.
Citing the Scout's versatile "Modular" architecture, it is fair to say that the bike's adaptability is also something akin to a Medicine Man that can shape-shift.

With that in mind, I hope I have offered an understanding of what the new Indian Scout truly is and that others might share my enthusiasm in a new light.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
I can't wait to see what you come up with. I am a track addict and probably wouldn't mind taking a track version of the Scout out there. As far as track riding with the Scout is concerned, I think the biggest issue would be lack of lean angle and peg placement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
I can't wait to see what you come up with. I am a track addict and probably wouldn't mind taking a track version of the Scout out there. As far as track riding with the Scout is concerned, I think the biggest issue would be lack of lean angle and peg placement.
Thank you for your reply, Dr Doom. :)


Casey Stoner Lean Angle.JPG

I agree. A track bike is going to need a lean angle that would make riders Corner Stoner Happy.
uhhh.... tongue in cheek.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
Too bad the frame is aluminum - increases the difficulty to make mods. I like the idea as the scout is underpowered and pretty heavy. Starting everyone thinking is a great start. Once i get mine in the garage - let the mods begin. I would love to get rid of the forward controls and get the bike taller. It has quite a bike of rake already. I am thinking cafe - thruxton style. Exhaust has to go. I already have ducatis and a BMW with 180 + hp. So this one would be more retro. Lose maybe 40 lbs and get 20% more hp. Need to see the bike in person before i start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Preliminary Research




V-Twin

V angleExamples
20°Daimler engine used in 1889 Stahlrad motor car[SUP][2][/SUP]
26°Matchless Silver Arrow
42°Indian Powerplus, Chief, Scout
45°Crocker Motorcycles
Harley-Davidson
Sokół 1000
Suzuki VX 800; Boulevard C50, M50, S50, S83
Honda VT1100 Shadow
47.5°Vincent Rapide Series A
48°Yamaha MT-01, XV1600, XV1700
49°Indian Thunder Stroke 111, Chief, Chieftain [SUP][12][/SUP]
50°AJS S3
BSA Model E, G14, Y13
Husqvarna Motorcycles
Brough Superior SS100 (JAP engine)
Kawasaki Vulcan 1500, 1600
Matchless Model X
Victory Motorcycles
Vincent Rapide Series B, C
52°Honda:
Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 & 2000
54°Suzuki Boulevard:
55°Kawasaki Vulcan 750, 800, 900
56.25°S&S X-Wedge Engine
60°Britten V1000
Harley-Davidson VRSC
Highland Motorcycles
Aprilia RSV Mille, Tuono (Rotax engines)
Yamaha XV250, XVS250
70°Suzuki RGV250(VJ23)
Yamaha XVS650
72°Moto Morini 350, 500
Buell 1125R (Rotax engine)
Voxan
75°Hyosung GT250, GV250
KTM 1190 RC8
Yamaha TR1, Virago, XVS1100
77°Aprilia RXV/SXV
80°Honda CX series
Rotax 810, 660, 490
87°Moto Morini Corsaro 1200
90°Aprilia:
Bimota V Due
Briggs & Stratton
Cagiva
Ducati
Folan 290
Gilera GP 800
Hesketh V1000
Honda:

Hyosung GT650, GV650
Kawasaki Prairie 650, V-Force
Mazda
Moto Guzzi
Suzuki:

V-Strom
120°1934 Moto Guzzi 500cc
170°Zündapp KS 601

V-twin engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




V-Twin + Inline Four = V4

SBV4 1200cc (Lightning Stroke 4) Indian's V4 answer to X
BBV4 2400cc (Thunder Stroke 4) Indian's V4 answer to the VMax?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Too bad the frame is aluminum - increases the difficulty to make mods. I like the idea as the scout is underpowered and pretty heavy. Starting everyone thinking is a great start. Once i get mine in the garage - let the mods begin. I would love to get rid of the forward controls and get the bike taller. It has quite a bike of rake already. I am thinking cafe - thruxton style. Exhaust has to go. I already have ducatis and a BMW with 180 + hp. So this one would be more retro. Lose maybe 40 lbs and get 20% more hp. Need to see the bike in person before i start.

BW,

Nothing wrong with the bike as it stands for it's original intended application. Modifying is a breeze - the difference with respect to the modular cast chassis
is familiarity in the manufacturing processes of pattern-making, moldmaking, casting and machining techniques. The difficulty only lies in the way of it being less accessable to the average do-it-yourselfer. It's expensive to acquire all the machinery and know-how to do this on your own. However, since there ARE aftermarket firms that DO supply high-performance hardware, it's not unreasonable to think that they couldn't develop alternative front and rear sub-structure components and contract production firms to produce the product. Developing a sport bike chassis kit IS a realistic possibility.

There are only 3 major cast components on the Scout's modular architecture. The Stem/Radiator shell, the Battery/radiator overflow and Rear-Suspension
Mounting "Box" beneath the saddle, and the arched rear fender/pillion mount casting. Those are the only three major components. The rear fender mount
casting is bolted to the "Box" - Remove that and you shed some weight. (refer to photos I took below)

P1010091.JPG P1010087.JPG


A machined aluminum plate that interfaces between the seat and carbon fiber tail/fender/flush tail-lamp assembly should be a breeze. (No passengers)

Those other two main castings are aluminum, but they could be re-shaped and cast in other materials such as Magnesium.


Titanium Exhaust Headers and Titanium/Carbon Silencers.

Magnesium or Carbon Fiber Wheels

Carbon Fiber Front Fender

DID or X chain drive system. Carbon Fiber chain guard and sprocket cover.

Swap out the OE front fork/Fender Wheel/Brake/Headlight/Handlebars - everything goes. In it's place will reside a world-class performance handling
front end via custom triple tree, extended reach clip on bar or race clip-ons (Fork and brake system I'm thinking Brembo, Ohlins, Marzocchi or Showa)

Swingarm would either be Carbon Fiber or Magnesium (Dual or Mono shock depending on personal preferance which will naturally dictate other
compatible components)

Fuel tank could be alumium, molded plastic with carbon fiber covers or a fully lined carbon fiber tank.

A complete aftermarket High Performance Chassis kit could be developed around the engine itself.


Therefore if a Scout owner wanted to build a bike in the spirit of the '60s Cafe Racers, he would opt for dual rear swing arm and suspension architecture
kit.
Another Scout owner wanting the latest in high performance handling that is world class MotoGP circuit worthy, he could opt for the Single Arm Swingarm
Architecture which is the current and popular if not "Standard" approach on elite Pro-bikes and premium performance street.

My personal conceptual vision is a hybrid Ducati-Indian / Diavel-Scout influenced Super-Cruiser design - capture the weight and power and
handling characteristics of the Diavel, which is accessible to a larger group of customer statures and inseams, and deliver on the comforts of the
cruiser which appeals to the comfort oriented Scout customers who want just a little bit more. -

And yes, the bike WILL need much improvement on it's output figures and increase it's ceiling - I'd shoot for 200hp (max) Most certainly would
want to meet or exceed the Diavel's output specifications.

Anyway, at this point, it's really barnstorming the brainstorms. Speculating the possibilities of what could be.

The Scout's Design is that good. It simply inspires a world of what-ifs. - From there, somebody, maybe Indian Motorcycle Co., themselves, who has
the available funds and resources is going to work on those what ifs and turn what are now only thoughts into reality. It's only a matter of time.




Sandcasting
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/2009+...chieves+core+vision+with+frame...-a0200409034
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Below is a simple composite rendering of the removal of the rear fender brace sub-assembly casting.
Refer to the rear fender brace bolts in the 2 photos, above.


2014-Indian-Scout-CAD-1 Project 20XX 101 Scout_1.jpg

The objective here is to highlight the Scout's modular simplicity.

1) An alternative rear fender/bodywork and sub-assembly should be
a relatively simple and straightforward affair.
2) It "may" be necessary to fabricate a rear brace for anchoring the rear
portion of the saddle. (at present, it is unknown how the seat is fastened.)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
BW,

Nothing wrong with the bike as it stands for it's original intended application. Modifying is a breeze - the difference with respect to the modular cast chassis
is familiarity in the manufacturing processes of pattern-making, moldmaking, casting and machining techniques. The difficulty only lies in the way of it being less accessable to the average do-it-yourselfer. It's expensive to acquire all the machinery and know-how to do this on your own. However, since there ARE aftermarket firms that DO supply high-performance hardware, it's not unreasonable to think that they couldn't develop alternative front and rear sub-structure components and contract production firms to produce the product. Developing a sport bike chassis kit IS a realistic possibility.

There are only 3 major cast components on the Scout's modular architecture. The Stem/Radiator shell, the Battery/radiator overflow and Rear-Suspension
Mounting "Box" beneath the saddle, and the arched rear fender/pillion mount casting. Those are the only three major components. The rear fender mount
casting is bolted to the "Box" - Remove that and you shed some weight. (refer to photos I took below)

View attachment 2251 View attachment 2252


A machined aluminum plate that interfaces between the seat and carbon fiber tail/fender/flush tail-lamp assembly should be a breeze. (No passengers)

Those other two main castings are aluminum, but they could be re-shaped and cast in other materials such as Magnesium.


Titanium Exhaust Headers and Titanium/Carbon Silencers.

Magnesium or Carbon Fiber Wheels

Carbon Fiber Front Fender

DID or X chain drive system. Carbon Fiber chain guard and sprocket cover.

Swap out the OE front fork/Fender Wheel/Brake/Headlight/Handlebars - everything goes. In it's place will reside a world-class performance handling
front end via custom triple tree, extended reach clip on bar or race clip-ons (Fork and brake system I'm thinking Brembo, Ohlins, Marzocchi or Showa)

Swingarm would either be Carbon Fiber or Magnesium (Dual or Mono shock depending on personal preferance which will naturally dictate other
compatible components)

Fuel tank could be alumium, molded plastic with carbon fiber covers or a fully lined carbon fiber tank.

A complete aftermarket High Performance Chassis kit could be developed around the engine itself.


Therefore if a Scout owner wanted to build a bike in the spirit of the '60s Cafe Racers, he would opt for dual rear swing arm and suspension architecture
kit.
Another Scout owner wanting the latest in high performance handling that is world class MotoGP circuit worthy, he could opt for the Single Arm Swingarm
Architecture which is the current and popular if not "Standard" approach on elite Pro-bikes and premium performance street.

My personal conceptual vision is a hybrid Ducati-Indian / Diavel-Scout influenced Super-Cruiser design - capture the weight and power and
handling characteristics of the Diavel, which is accessible to a larger group of customer statures and inseams, and deliver on the comforts of the
cruiser which appeals to the comfort oriented Scout customers who want just a little bit more. -

And yes, the bike WILL need much improvement on it's output figures and increase it's ceiling - I'd shoot for 200hp (max) Most certainly would
want to meet or exceed the Diavel's output specifications.

Anyway, at this point, it's really barnstorming the brainstorms. Speculating the possibilities of what could be.

The Scout's Design is that good. It simply inspires a world of what-ifs. - From there, somebody, maybe Indian Motorcycle Co., themselves, who has
the available funds and resources is going to work on those what ifs and turn what are now only thoughts into reality. It's only a matter of time.




Sandcasting
2009 Casting Competition: Polaris achieves core vision with frame casting: motorcycle developers at Polaris designed a minimalist yet complex cast aluminum frame, which Craft Pattern and Mold engineered, tooled and delivered in less than five weeks.

This is going to be a great adventure! I'll try to keep my bike stock for a few months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
twinhit,,,,,,, I thought i saw somewhere in your 107 posts [whew] that you could not afford to put a deposit down on a scout?

why all the speculation and dreaming and constant posting about an object you are not going to have?
Bored in san diego ?
go surfing in the Pacific Ocean......have some fun and take your mind off the unattainable....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
twinhit,,,,,,, I thought i saw somewhere in your 107 posts [whew] that you could not afford to put a deposit down on a scout?

why all the speculation and dreaming and constant posting about an object you are not going to have?
Bored in san diego ?
go surfing in the Pacific Ocean......have some fun and take your mind off the unattainable....

jarhead,
Why all the speculation and dreams? Don't you know? ALLreality began with a dream.

For some dreams to become reality, careful research, study, planning, coordination and execution are necessary. All of which, takes time. All of which are
wisely divided into phases and stages. A work of art, a masterpiece, like the finest of the finest aged wine, takes time. It is NOT to be rushed.
Another critical "rule of thumb to remember" point, to note, in course of realizing some dreams, is that it is NOT just WHAT you know, but WHO you know.

George Hendee nor Oscar Hedstrom started the original Indian Motocycle Company by themselves but together, they shared a dream. A vision. One that
that would go on to become the stuff of legends that inspired countless owners and riders, racers, tinkerers, inventors, budding entrepreneurs, and no less, no doubt,
it's own competitors, who, understandably, might never admit it. That Polaris would take the risk that it has in acquiring the iconic brand, in that Polaris/Indian's unveiling of
the 2014 Chief a couple of years later and unveil the 2015 Scout only a year after that.... cannot help BUT inspire the passionate spark of imagination.
I'll tell you, the entire team at Polaris/Indian, from the top, down, involved in the Chief's and the Scout's development's, in my opinion, true commercial product resurrection
are, in my mind, truly inspiring. Their hard work would not have brought to the modern market these two machines that bear the names of two legendary icons, which legendary
icons are the product of Charles Franklin and his team's efforts. Icons which began as a dream.
I am very confident that Mr. Hendee and Mr. Hedstrom, along with Charles Franklin, would be thoroughly enthusiastic about the revival of these two machines and
would be very pleased.

[h=1]George M. Hendee[/h]


George M. Hendee (October 2, 1866 – 1943) was a co-founder of the Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company.

[h=2]Bicycle Racing[/h]
George M. Hendee took up bicycle racing at age 16. He won the United States National Amateur High Wheel Championship in 1886, setting a new world record over a dirt half-mile track of 2 minutes 27.4 seconds, which he held until 1892.[SUP][1][/SUP] Hendee was America's first national cycling champion, winning 302 of the 309 races he entered and dedicating himself to racing and traveling to bicycling events.
[h=2]Manufacturing[/h]
In 1892 Hendee retired from bicycle racing and began making Silver King bicycles at 41-43 Taylor Street in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1895.[SUP][2][/SUP] In 1896, the Hendee & Nelson Manufacturing Company at 478 Main Street in Springfield, Massachusetts was building safety bicycles under the names Silver King for men and Silver Queen for women.[SUP][3][/SUP] The company went bankrupt; and Hendee purchased the entire inventory at auction and set up shop on Worthington Street in 1898,[SUP][4][/SUP] incorporating the Hendee Manufacturing Company with a capital stock of $5,000. The company's new line of bicycles was called Indian.[SUP][5][/SUP]
Hendee sponsored a number of bicycle racers and events throughout New England. It was during an event at Madison Square Garden in New York in January 1900 that Hendee became acquainted with Carl Oscar Hedström and witnessed first-hand the excellent performance of the motorized pacing bicycle built by Hedström.


Hendee and Hedström signed a partnership agreement in January 1901, and Hedström became the chief engineer and designer. The first Indian prototype was built by Hedström at the Worcester Bicycle Manufacturing Company in Middletown, Connecticut, and the first public demonstration was held on Cross Street in Springfield, Massachusetts, on May 10, 1901.
Hedström traveled to Aurora, Illinois, to refine his engine design, and Hendee Mfg. Co. contracted and licensed the Aurora Automatic Machine Company to build the engine (the contract was terminated on March 5, 1907). Hedström supervised all aspects of manufacture, including the design of production molds and machines and expansion of both factories (the main factory on State Street and the forging factory "Hendeeville" in East Springfield), while Hendee, as president and general manager, traveled extensively to set up dealerships and arrange financing.

By 1912, Hendee Manufacturing was the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer. In 1913, the company's production peaked at 32,000 units.[SUP][6][/SUP] The company's name was changed to Indian Motocycle in October 1923.[SUP][7][/SUP]



[h=2]Retirement[/h] In 1915, Hendee resigned as general manager but remained as president. In 1916, at the age of 49, Hendee retired from Hendee Manufacturing after a disagreement with the board of directors over the direction of the organization. In his retirement, he bred Guernsey cattle and White leghorn chickens on his 500-acre (2.0 km[SUP]2[/SUP]) Hilltop Farm in Suffield, Connecticut. He sold his estate in 1940 and moved to a smaller home in Suffield where he died in 1943 at the age of 76.

Source - George M. Hendee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



[h=1]Oscar Hedstrom[/h]Oscar Hedstrom (12 March 1871 – 29 August 1960) was a co-founder of the Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company, makers of the Indian Motocycle.


Childhood and adolescence
Carl Oscar Hedstrom was born in the little parish of Lönneberga, Hultsfred Municipality, Kalmar County, Småland, Sweden. His family emigrated in 1880 to the United States, and settled in Brooklyn, New York City. As a young boy, he spent much time riding a bicycle around the city, and was fascinated by its mechanical design.
[h=2]Career[/h] At age 16 he started working at a small engineering workshop in the Bronx, New York, where he learned to manufacture watch cases and components.[SUP][1][/SUP] He worked as an apprentice in several small workshops, until he was 21 when he obtained journeyman status.

[h=2]On two wheels[/h] In his spare time Hedstrom built high-quality bicycles that were lighter and more durable than standard bikes. He rented a workshop space in Middletown, Connecticut where he designed and cast engines from his own patterns. He also designed and build a concentric carburetor.[SUP][2][/SUP] While his reputation as a bicycle designer grew, he started to build tandem bicycles with gasoline engines. These were called pacers, and were used to split the wind for racing cyclists. The motorized pacers of that time functioned poorly, but Hedström's design quickly gained a reputation as being very reliable.[SUP][3][/SUP]
At this time he came into contact with the former cyclist George M Hendee from Springfield, Massachusetts, who now manufactured bicycles and sponsored contests. Hendee was dissatisfied with the pacers available, and asked Hedstrom to take one of his to Springfield. Hendee was so impressed that he asked Hedstrom to develop a prototype for a mass-manufactured motorized bicycle.

[h=2]Indian Motocycle Company[/h]The cooperation between Hedstrom and Hendee resulted in the Indian Motocycle Company. Hedstrom's design was innovative, and successful. Oscar Hedstrom resigned from the Indian Motocycle Company on 24 March 1913 after a disagreement with the board regarding dubious practices to inflate the company's stock values. George Hendee resigned in 1916. Hedstrom resided on his estate on the banks of the Connecticut River until he died in 1960.[SUP][4][/SUP]
Source - Oscar Hedstrom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[h=1]Charles Franklin[/h]
Charles Bayly Franklin (October 13, 1880 - October 19, 1932) was an engineer and a motorcycle racer. He is most notable for designing motorcycles for the Indian Motocycle Company, including the original Indian Scout of 1920, the original Indian Chief of 1922, and the Indian 101 Scout of 1928. Prior to this, he had been part of the Indian motorcycle team that won first, second, and third place in the 1911 Isle of Man TT, finishing in second place.
Source - Charles Franklin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jarhead, IF I were to follow YOUR philosophy and outlook on life, and YOUR attitude, and just throw my hands up and say "Boo-hoo, you're right, it's unattainable, hopeless and impossible. Poor pitiful me!!!
What am I doing here??!?!?!??? Why even bother?!?!?!???!!", I just might take up surfing in Atlanta, Georgia. But that's not my style, nor is it MY philosophy. No. It certainly is not. And neither was that the
case for Mr. Hendee when his company went bankrupt and he bought it at auction. - A disappointing downturn but he didn't give up and his investment began what would become the Indian Motocycle Mfg Co.
No one has ever achieved their goals by giving up and quiting. NOBODY.

When I acquire my horse, is when I acquire my horse. It's NOT going to kill me if I have to wait. In the meantime, I am just going to enjoy the ride, my way. Just like everyone else will enjoy their ride, their way.

There is a saying - "Birds of a feather flock together and boots on the ground can't fly." - That is to say that people of like minds will understand each other and ideas soar. But those who don't try, will not fly.


"Starting everyone thinking is a great start." - Bigwaves

Thanks BW, I agree. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Always finding great and unique ideas.

For many, what you are about to see, immediately below is sacrilege and a horrid travesty and blasphemous
act of savage imagination. I dare say... COOL. Barbaric and most assuredly, poor form... but COOL.
Ducati, might take a hint and build a future bike for this market segment.

MCY0314-MEMY-001.jpg

Read the whole article
Source: 2013 Ducati 1199 Panigale ?TerraCorsa? | ME & MY BIKE | Motorcyclist

My point in posting it here is to simply illustrate what thinking outside the box looks like. While I personally
would be skeptical about sinking money into a more expensive bike for such modifications, the concept the
gent in the pic had shows promise of what a Ducati can be. That is, if Arun Sharma can produce that "TerraCorsa",
Then the Scout can be configured likewise. For a price of course.

Imagine knobbies in place of the stock Indian tires, Ohlins fork and rear suspension (and related), a
5 inch lift, custom high exhaust, mid-controls and viola a test-bed dual-sport mule.
Perfecting the design may involve modifications to the drivetrain from the transmission back to the rear cog (which
should be a chain for such an application)

With street tires, and rear sets, the modular design could begin to mutate into a builder's interpretation of the Cafe Racer.

The Scout's modularity is such a work of practical art, I would personally be shocked if the bike is relegated to strictly
custom paint and chrome exercises.


Cycle World interviewed Indian Scout Design Team leader, Rich Christoph. Below is a quick excerpt of the interview
offering a peek into Indian's thinking:

Richard-Christoph-1-590x393.jpg
CW: What was your design goal as far as making this a modern Scout?
RC: It may break away from the early Scout technology-wise, but it doesn’t break away from it spirit-wise, as far as the legend of the Scout goes. When the Scout came out it was so well received because of its performance. The Scout is all about performing well in all of its environments and scenarios. Its power-to-weight ratio, how a rider feels and interacts on it, a very spirited ride, a competent machine, multifaceted in its disciplines, and in what the rider asks from it. That is the Scout mentality. We carried forward Scout’s identity and impression on the riding public. It captures the spirit, the essence of what Scout was.

Source: CYCLE WORLD INTERVIEW: Richard Christoph, Indian Scout Design Team Leader

With those thoughts in mind, for some riders, the Scout in it's standard cruiser form is best, for others, improvements
to the suspension that improve riding comfort may be necessary. For the eccentric, twisties addict, those suspension improvements may include high end performance forks, rear springs and brakes which suit their needs. Another owner,
may live in the sticks and need some off-road capability to suit their needs.

Those are just three different groups of riders who may want the Scout but are lured to other, more purpose built,
machines, as the Scout's current configuration is primarily "Cruiser" and not quit the bike they are looking for but
still would like to own. These customers are the ones who may not want to buy two bikes but find a bike that
they really like but is still not quite it.
I don't think Indian would want to box themselves in with just the Scout model that is only now beginning production.
Seeing that the bike stellar in it's chrome department, it's clear that practicality and function were high on the designer's list following the original Scout's design and performance reputation.
The versatility of the Scout's modular design simply cannot be overlooked and under-appreciated.
Professional bike builders have already tinkered with the Chief, no doubt, there will be Scouts that see the custom
and performance shops as well.
A whole industry could spring up around this one motorcycle.
Unless of course, Indian is on the ball and has already decided to do it's own variations on a theme and make
the altered variations of this product more easily available to their customers.

Thank you for reading.
 

Attachments

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top