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2017 Springfield
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Search isn't working, so forgive me if this has been asked before. I keep seeing people posting very high gas mileage (mpg) but I never get anywhere close to those numbers on my unmodified 2017 Springfield. I think I have seen above 41 mpg once, but most of the time it is between 35-37. Could it be it the way I ride or my maybe shifting? Is it that I am on slower roads and have to shift more than open highways? Just curious.
 

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Any brake drag noticeable? Roll easy? Tire pressure optimum?
Rolling resistance is easily overlooked.

Another thought... how about the air filter, clean and attached good?
A couple of the worst gas mileages I ever had on a motorcycle (very few as there were) was from restricted air intake and intake boot leaks.
 
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Rider
2017 Springfield
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973 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any brake drag noticeable? Roll easy? Tire pressure optimum?
Rolling resistance is easily overlooked.

Another thought... how about the air filter, clean and attached good?
A couple of the worst gas mileages I ever had on a motorcycle (very few as there were) was from restricted air intake and intake boot leaks.
No brake drag as it rolls very easily. I keep the air pressure correct. I’ll check the air filter in the morning. Thanks!
 

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don't worry... that's where I'm at with my Limited... used to bug me... but doesn't anymore.... now I'm waiting to see if I get 20K out of my tires like most say... if I do it will be the first time I made it past 9k on a set from any bike in my life
 

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35-37 is a pretty typical number. You need to remember that people like to talk about MPG just like how big the fish was that they just caught or the size of their .....

Things that impact MPG the most (in order of impact) -
  • Speed: Drag increases by the square of the velocity; a 10 mph increase in speed will significantly reduce mileage.
  • Surface area: If you (or the bike's shield are larger, you have to 'push' a lot more air out of the way. As an example, when I put my soft lowers on the engine guards during the winter months I will see a decrease of about 3-4 mpg.
  • Wind: Head wind/tail wind ... changes drag as mentioned above.
  • Throttle: Heavy or light ... pretty easy to understand this one.
  • Rolling resistance: Tire pressure and tire composition can easily make a difference of 1-2 mpg.
  • Altitude: Higher altitudes result in thinner air pressure so one will typically get better mileage at higher altitudes (assuming the computer manages the air/gas ratio)
  • Weight: Also easy to understand this.
 

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Rider
2017 Springfield
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973 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
35-37 is a pretty typical number. You need to remember that people like to talk about MPG just like how big the fish was that they just caught or the size of their .....

Things that impact MPG the most (in order of impact) -
  • Speed: Drag increases by the square of the velocity; a 10 mph increase in speed will significantly reduce mileage.
  • Surface area: If you (or the bike's shield are larger, you have to 'push' a lot more air out of the way. As an example, when I put my soft lowers on the engine guards during the winter months I will see a decrease of about 3-4 mpg.
  • Wind: Head wind/tail wind ... changes drag as mentioned above.
  • Throttle: Heavy or light ... pretty easy to understand this one.
  • Rolling resistance: Tire pressure and tire composition can easily make a difference of 1-2 mpg.
  • Altitude: Higher altitudes result in thinner air pressure so one will typically get better mileage at higher altitudes (assuming the computer manages the air/gas ratio)
  • Weight: Also easy to understand this.
Being 6’3”, 260 lbs, barely above sea level (around Houston) and riding with a shield and lowers means I am creating a lot of drag and should expect to see lower MPG. I didn’t mention that I may be a little heavy on the throttle coming out of turns. I feel much better now. Thanks!
 

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Another Springfield rider here. My Fuelly tracker shows me getting 39.7 average US mpg for the life of the bike. What I notice is that the windshield is a major drag item, especially when riding into a headwind. I take mine off for summer riding around town and my fuel use improves by almost 20% with it off.
 

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I think what you are getting is typical considering your size, weight and riding habits. I recently changed my stage 1 tune with a PV3 and before I was getting about 40 mpg now I am getting around 35-37 but that is because I am in the throttle more and fueling to the engine has increased a bit. This time of year fuel usage goes up too because of warm up time and I see less fuel usage during warmer weather.
 

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My 2017 SF gets 37.3 US mpg. I reset occasionally, but it settles back to around this number each time.
I have stage 1 pipes / AC and stage 2 cams, with a CraigB PVCX tune loaded.
Most of my riding is suburban.
I get a lot better mpg on the open road.
 

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Same here :
with my 585s and all kinds of stage I hardware I get anywhere between 33 and 38 mpg. Mostly with 14" flared windshield and hard bags on my classic.

A lot depends for my own tune on 2up or not while cruising : can be the determining factor between closed loop ops (14.7) and some richer power ops fuelling.

And since the 585s are a joy to constantly rocket ship away I get 38 only on constant speed long distance cruises riding solo.


Sent from my SM-N976Q using Tapatalk
 

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OK, I'll play... I'm 5'9" and weigh in at 185. I live at 3,300' and frequently ride to higher elevations though not always as Arizona offers lots of choices. I do not hesitate to twist the right wrist and typically cruise 80 on the interstates. My 17 SF is completely stock though I did add JES lower wind deflectors. My bride who is 5'1" and 118# rides with me about 25% oof the time.

Solo I consistently get 43 and two up 41. Up in the southern Rockies {8, 9, or even 10K'+} I have seen 50 a time or two but usually average 45-47 solo and 44 two up. These numbers are fairly consistent between pump calculations and the digital display and yes, I run nothing but premium {91-93 octane}. My mileage probably reflects the fact that I am rarely at much less over 3,000 rpm which gives me decent acceleration and an 80 mph interstate cruise and I use cruise control a lot... works for me.

:cool:
 

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2019 Roadmaster matte black and gray
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I average 35-37. Mostly ride solo.
I've noticed when I'm in a group ride (read: easy starts, sensible acceleration and same cruising speed) I get about 50 mpg.

I think I'm the problem
 

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Stock 2016 Springfield except with factory lower wind deflectors AND factory 3” lower front windscreen. I am 5’10” 185. I am running 89 octane. Indian oil. 15 K on odometer. 41.6 is still displayed on my gauge. Shifting just a little higher RPMs than book recommendation. I noticed at least a 1 and maybe 2 mpg increase with the lower windshield ( I have one for sale here). 75% riding on 55 mph roads ( but driving close to 65) on highway loops around Louisville, KY at 500 ft. above sea level. Running 75-78 on the 70 mph interstate, milage drops to about 38. Hot summer, mileage goes up with thinner air.
I still remember about the first thing I noticed about the Springfield was how much bigger the windshield is than my 1989 FLHS. Factory shield is huge! Which of course relates to drag.
 
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