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2020 Indian Springfield
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently decided to swap out the OEM halogen headlight bulb and driving/fog light bulbs in my 2020 Springfield for a set of Sylvania SilverStar zXe “xenon fueled” bulbs (size H4 for the headlight, H8 for the driving/fog lights).

615267


Since I'm not exactly the handiest guy around—coupled with the fact that this was my first time replacing any of the bulbs on my bike—I consulted the repository of all human knowledge, conspiracy theories, porn and cat videos: the internet.

In short order I discovered that there wasn’t much out there that wasn’t confusing, outdated or both. Yet undaunted I forged ahead, piecing together bits of information found here and there, eventually completing the job without too much trouble.

What follows is a fairly detailed description of how I did it. There are other methods, some better and some worse but this is what I did. Unfortunately, what follows isn’t as complete as it might be since at the time I wasn’t sure how it was going to come out. It is, however, better than nothing (though perhaps not by much).

NOTE: While these instructions pertain to a 2020 Springfield, it’s possible that they might apply to other years and models as well. You’d need to look into that yourself. I mean c’mon, I can’t do all the legwork for you. After all I did tip you off about the porn and the cat videos, did I not?

That Stupid Indian YouTube Video
615268


If you’re reading this then there’s a good chance that you’ve already come across the Indian YouTube video on how to change the headlight bulb entirely from the rear: Simply turn the handlebars to the left, reach into the open space on the right to access the back of the bulb and—voilà—new bulb installed. This is all well and good if you have the hands of a third-grader but what about the rest of us?

Since third grade is many, many years in my rear-view mirror, I decided instead to access the bulb by removing a portion of the headlight nacelle. While the video is absurd in that it never actually shows you how to reach the back of the bulb—opting instead to illustrate the bulb removal with the headlight housing ALREADY REMOVED (umm...thanks?)--it’s not entirely worthless and I'll be referring you back to it later in these instructions.

Tools & Supplies Used

These are simply what I used. What you’ll need may differ slightly so it’d be a good idea to read ahead before gathering everything up.

615271

  • Ratchet with 6-inch extension
  • 10mm socket
  • 5mm ball-end hex wrench with 9-inch T-handle
  • 4mm T-handle hex wrench
  • Tool magnetizer
  • Phillips head screwdriver (not pictured)
  • Headlamp (not pictured)
  • Thin plastic gloves (not pictured)
  • Two thick towels (not pictured)
  • TV tray (not pictured)
  • Several cold beers (not pictured)
Step 1: Remove your windshield

Sure, you might be able to do this with a windshield in place. You can also mow your lawn with scissors or brush your teeth with your feet but that doesn't mean there isn't a better way. As for me, since I wasn’t looking to make the job any more difficult than it had to be off came the windshield.

Step 2: Remove the two screws on top of the headlight nacelle

615272


One of the first things I added to my bike was a ridiculously overpriced Indian handlebar bag. It’s secured to the bike by the two screws at the top rear of the headlight nacelle. You can’t see the two screws in the picture but trust me, they’re there.

The bag came with its own hardware so I’m afraid I’m not sure what size and type the original screws were. On my bike it’s two 4mm hex screws, each with a washer and a spacer accessed from within the bag itself and removed with the 4mm T-handle hex wrench. On your bike it may be different but either way remove the two screws and pity me for being stupid enough to have paid $200+ for a bag for my sunglasses.

Step 3: Remove the screw and bolt from the right rear of the headlight nacelle

As mentioned in the Indian video you’ll want to start by gently turning your handlebars all the way to the left. This will reveal a small, dark space on the right side that affords access to the rear of the headlight nacelle (this is when you might want to grab a flashlight or—in my case—a headlamp). Inside you’ll find a screw and a bolt that you’ll need to remove, the top being a 5mm hex screw and the bottom a 10mm bolt.

615273


Using the tool magnetizer, I first magnetized the 5mm ball-end hex wrench with 9-inch T-handle (draw the metal portion of the wrench numerous times through the large “magnetize” hole in the magnetizer being careful not to rotate the wrench while doing so…see magnetizer’s instructions for details.)

I then used it to remove the top hex screw, the ball end allowing me to angle the T-handle much more easily than trying to do so straight on. BTW, be careful not to drop either the screw or the washer (which is why I first magnetized the wrench, just in case.)

Next, remove the 10mm bolt using the ratchet, 6-inch extender and 10mm socket. I found this one a bit easier to reach than the hex screw so I didn’t bother trying to magnetize the socket. Regardless, be careful not to drop the bolt.

Step 4: Remove the screw and bolt from the right rear of the headlight nacelle

Carefully turn the handlebars all the way to the right. As before this will reveal the space on the left side of the bike in which you’ll find the screw and bolt that need to be removed. Before doing so drape a towel or two over your front fender.

615274


Using the ball-end hex and the socket wrench remove the hex screw and bolt as you did on the right side.

CAUTION: Although the nacelle was kind enough to have remained in place after I removed the final bolt I can’t promise that it’ll do the same for you so be careful not to let the nacelle fall onto the front of your bike (thus the towel, just in case.)

Step 5: Remove the headlight nacelle housing

Keeping one hand on the front nacelle housing (to keep it from falling off) carefully straighten the handlebars. Place the TV tray or a table of similar height as close as possible next to the headlight nacelle. Step around to the front of the bike and remove the nacelle housing by slowly and carefully pulling it forward. Once removed gently place it atop the TV tray on top of the other towel so that you’ll be able to work with both hands.

Step 6: Remove the old headlight bulb and insert the new one

Remember that stupid video? Now’s the time for a re-watch.

Follow the instructions for removing the old bulb and inserting the new one (H4). I suggest putting on plastic gloves for this part since you’ll want to avoid allowing the glass portion of the bulb to come into contact with your skin, lest the oils from your skin weaken the glass, possibly causing it to fail prematurely (or even explode, so I’ve been told). It might take a good yank or two so don’t get all worked up if it doesn’t come out on the first tug. Just remember to pull on the metal base, not the glass.

Be sure to note the top of the rubber boot (strangely enough marked “TOP”) as well as the position of the two small protrusions at the bottom edge of the metal base of the bulb (below): they’ll need to be positioned at the bottom when you insert the new bulb.

615275


Step 7: Reassemble the headlight nacelle housing

Before reassembling the headlight nacelle housing now would be a good time to make sure that the new bulb is working. Start your bike and make sure it lights up. If it doesn’t then check to make sure the bulb is seated properly. If it still doesn’t come on then you might have a bad bulb. Good thing Sylvania gave you two of ‘em in the package.

Assuming all went well carefully place the nacelle housing back onto the nacelle. Start with the two 10mm bolts and only put them in finger tight. You might need to apply some forward pressure to the front of the nacelle housing in order to allow the bolt to catch the receiving threads. As before you’ll want to be very careful not to let the bolts drop. If you have someone with small hands nearby this would be a good time to call in a favor. Know any third-graders, do you?

In the interest of helping ensure that the holes atop the nacelle will line up properly, re-install the two screws atop the nacelle at this time, keeping them loose for now.

Next come the two 5mm hex screws and washers, again keeping them loose and being careful not to drop them.

Snug everything up by alternating the various screws and bolts until everything is fully tightened to spec.

Step 8: Replace the bulbs in the driving/fog lights

These will seem so friggin’ easy after all that crap with the headlight. That’s why I saved them for last. What follows is also on that stupid Indian video so if you’ve already read quite enough for one day please feel free to skip this part.

Start by removing the small Phillips head screw at the bottom of the first driving/fog light. Carefully pull off the ring around the front of the housing. Give the bulb assembly a quarter turn and release it from the glass front of the light. Using the plastic gloves unplug the old bulb and plug in the new bulb.

Put the bulb assembly back into the glass front of the light with a quarter turn. Using the top of the light housing as a hinge place the light back on the housing and reinsert the Phillips screw. This last part might take a time or two to get right since the screw needs to go in at a bit of an odd angle. Test it out and if it lights up repeat the process for the second light.

Step 9: Bask in the warm, white glow of a job well done

If you haven't done so already now's the time to start enjoying those cold beers. Here’s my bike after I finished. I’ve named her Cheech in memory of my mother. Truth be told I’m not sure how Mom would feel about my having named my bike after her. Hopefully she’s too busy enjoying an eternity of indescribable bliss to give a damn about what I’m naming my vehicles.

615280


The Sylvania zXe’s do a nice job, although from what I’ve read it comes at the expense of a much shorter lifespan than the stock halogens. Given what a pain in the ass it is to get to that headlight bulb only time will tell if I stay the course with the zXe’s or move on to a longer-lived solution such as LEDs or paying a third-grader.

So there you have it. Stay safe, my friends, and keep the rubber side down!
 

· Registered
Joined
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4 Posts
I recently decided to swap out the OEM halogen headlight bulb and driving/fog light bulbs in my 2020 Springfield for a set of Sylvania SilverStar zXe “xenon fueled” bulbs (size H4 for the headlight, H8 for the driving/fog lights).

View attachment 615267

Since I'm not exactly the handiest guy around—coupled with the fact that this was my first time replacing any of the bulbs on my bike—I consulted the repository of all human knowledge, conspiracy theories, porn and cat videos: the internet.

In short order I discovered that there wasn’t much out there that wasn’t confusing, outdated or both. Yet undaunted I forged ahead, piecing together bits of information found here and there, eventually completing the job without too much trouble.

What follows is a fairly detailed description of how I did it. There are other methods, some better and some worse but this is what I did. Unfortunately, what follows isn’t as complete as it might be since at the time I wasn’t sure how it was going to come out. It is, however, better than nothing (though perhaps not by much).

NOTE: While these instructions pertain to a 2020 Springfield, it’s possible that they might apply to other years and models as well. You’d need to look into that yourself. I mean c’mon, I can’t do all the legwork for you. After all I did tip you off about the porn and the cat videos, did I not?

That Stupid Indian YouTube Video
View attachment 615268

If you’re reading this then there’s a good chance that you’ve already come across the Indian YouTube video on how to change the headlight bulb entirely from the rear: Simply turn the handlebars to the left, reach into the open space on the right to access the back of the bulb and—voilà—new bulb installed. This is all well and good if you have the hands of a third-grader but what about the rest of us?

Since third grade is many, many years in my rear-view mirror, I decided instead to access the bulb by removing a portion of the headlight nacelle. While the video is absurd in that it never actually shows you how to reach the back of the bulb—opting instead to illustrate the bulb removal with the headlight housing ALREADY REMOVED (umm...thanks?)--it’s not entirely worthless and I'll be referring you back to it later in these instructions.

Tools & Supplies Used

These are simply what I used. What you’ll need may differ slightly so it’d be a good idea to read ahead before gathering everything up.

View attachment 615271
  • Ratchet with 6-inch extension
  • 10mm socket
  • 5mm ball-end hex wrench with 9-inch T-handle
  • 4mm T-handle hex wrench
  • Tool magnetizer
  • Phillips head screwdriver (not pictured)
  • Headlamp (not pictured)
  • Thin plastic gloves (not pictured)
  • Two thick towels (not pictured)
  • TV tray (not pictured)
  • Several cold beers (not pictured)
Step 1: Remove your windshield

Sure, you might be able to do this with a windshield in place. You can also mow your lawn with scissors or brush your teeth with your feet but that doesn't mean there isn't a better way. As for me, since I wasn’t looking to make the job any more difficult than it had to be off came the windshield.

Step 2: Remove the two screws on top of the headlight nacelle

View attachment 615272


One of the first things I added to my bike was a ridiculously overpriced Indian handlebar bag. It’s secured to the bike by the two screws at the top rear of the headlight nacelle. You can’t see the two screws in the picture but trust me, they’re there.

The bag came with its own hardware so I’m afraid I’m not sure what size and type the original screws were. On my bike it’s two 4mm hex screws, each with a washer and a spacer accessed from within the bag itself and removed with the 4mm T-handle hex wrench. On your bike it may be different but either way remove the two screws and pity me for being stupid enough to have paid $200+ for a bag for my sunglasses.

Step 3: Remove the screw and bolt from the right rear of the headlight nacelle

As mentioned in the Indian video you’ll want to start by gently turning your handlebars all the way to the left. This will reveal a small, dark space on the right side that affords access to the rear of the headlight nacelle (this is when you might want to grab a flashlight or—in my case—a headlamp). Inside you’ll find a screw and a bolt that you’ll need to remove, the top being a 5mm hex screw and the bottom a 10mm bolt.

View attachment 615273

Using the tool magnetizer, I first magnetized the 5mm ball-end hex wrench with 9-inch T-handle (draw the metal portion of the wrench numerous times through the large “magnetize” hole in the magnetizer being careful not to rotate the wrench while doing so…see magnetizer’s instructions for details.)

I then used it to remove the top hex screw, the ball end allowing me to angle the T-handle much more easily than trying to do so straight on. BTW, be careful not to drop either the screw or the washer (which is why I first magnetized the wrench, just in case.)

Next, remove the 10mm bolt using the ratchet, 6-inch extender and 10mm socket. I found this one a bit easier to reach than the hex screw so I didn’t bother trying to magnetize the socket. Regardless, be careful not to drop the bolt.

Step 4: Remove the screw and bolt from the right rear of the headlight nacelle

Carefully turn the handlebars all the way to the right. As before this will reveal the space on the left side of the bike in which you’ll find the screw and bolt that need to be removed. Before doing so drape a towel or two over your front fender.

View attachment 615274

Using the ball-end hex and the socket wrench remove the hex screw and bolt as you did on the right side.

CAUTION: Although the nacelle was kind enough to have remained in place after I removed the final bolt I can’t promise that it’ll do the same for you so be careful not to let the nacelle fall onto the front of your bike (thus the towel, just in case.)

Step 5: Remove the headlight nacelle housing

Keeping one hand on the front nacelle housing (to keep it from falling off) carefully straighten the handlebars. Place the TV tray or a table of similar height as close as possible next to the headlight nacelle. Step around to the front of the bike and remove the nacelle housing by slowly and carefully pulling it forward. Once removed gently place it atop the TV tray on top of the other towel so that you’ll be able to work with both hands.

Step 6: Remove the old headlight bulb and insert the new one

Remember that stupid video? Now’s the time for a re-watch.

Follow the instructions for removing the old bulb and inserting the new one (H4). I suggest putting on plastic gloves for this part since you’ll want to avoid allowing the glass portion of the bulb to come into contact with your skin, lest the oils from your skin weaken the glass, possibly causing it to fail prematurely (or even explode, so I’ve been told). It might take a good yank or two so don’t get all worked up if it doesn’t come out on the first tug. Just remember to pull on the metal base, not the glass.

Be sure to note the top of the rubber boot (strangely enough marked “TOP”) as well as the position of the two small protrusions at the bottom edge of the metal base of the bulb (below): they’ll need to be positioned at the bottom when you insert the new bulb.

View attachment 615275

Step 7: Reassemble the headlight nacelle housing

Before reassembling the headlight nacelle housing now would be a good time to make sure that the new bulb is working. Start your bike and make sure it lights up. If it doesn’t then check to make sure the bulb is seated properly. If it still doesn’t come on then you might have a bad bulb. Good thing Sylvania gave you two of ‘em in the package.

Assuming all went well carefully place the nacelle housing back onto the nacelle. Start with the two 10mm bolts and only put them in finger tight. You might need to apply some forward pressure to the front of the nacelle housing in order to allow the bolt to catch the receiving threads. As before you’ll want to be very careful not to let the bolts drop. If you have someone with small hands nearby this would be a good time to call in a favor. Know any third-graders, do you?

In the interest of helping ensure that the holes atop the nacelle will line up properly, re-install the two screws atop the nacelle at this time, keeping them loose for now.

Next come the two 5mm hex screws and washers, again keeping them loose and being careful not to drop them.

Snug everything up by alternating the various screws and bolts until everything is fully tightened to spec.

Step 8: Replace the bulbs in the driving/fog lights

These will seem so friggin’ easy after all that crap with the headlight. That’s why I saved them for last. What follows is also on that stupid Indian video so if you’ve already read quite enough for one day please feel free to skip this part.

Start by removing the small Phillips head screw at the bottom of the first driving/fog light. Carefully pull off the ring around the front of the housing. Give the bulb assembly a quarter turn and release it from the glass front of the light. Using the plastic gloves unplug the old bulb and plug in the new bulb.

Put the bulb assembly back into the glass front of the light with a quarter turn. Using the top of the light housing as a hinge place the light back on the housing and reinsert the Phillips screw. This last part might take a time or two to get right since the screw needs to go in at a bit of an odd angle. Test it out and if it lights up repeat the process for the second light.

Step 9: Bask in the warm, white glow of a job well done

If you haven't done so already now's the time to start enjoying those cold beers. Here’s my bike after I finished. I’ve named her Cheech in memory of my mother. Truth be told I’m not sure how Mom would feel about my having named my bike after her. Hopefully she’s too busy enjoying an eternity of indescribable bliss to give a damn about what I’m naming my vehicles.

View attachment 615280

The Sylvania zXe’s do a nice job, although from what I’ve read it comes at the expense of a much shorter lifespan than the stock halogens. Given what a pain in the ass it is to get to that headlight bulb only time will tell if I stay the course with the zXe’s or move on to a longer-lived solution such as LEDs or paying a third-grader.

So there you have it. Stay safe, my friends, and keep the rubber side down!
Thanks for taking the time and effort to post this. I apparently need to swap out the bulb on my 2016. It's still working fine but the high beam indicator started flashing yesterday and generated a code that seems to indicate it's sensing a current draw issue with the light, thus it may be getting ready to fail. Yeah, there's no reaching the bulb through the rear with your hand to change this out. They're smoking something.
 
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