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I like everything I read and see about this bike. Looking forward to a test ride. One problem. 3.3 gallons of fuel will not cut it for me.
 

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3.3 is not bad. I have a Sportster right now with a 3.3 tank. Its not a problem at all. I fill up at around 120 miles. On long trips I just bring a few fuel canisters, although I have never had to use them yet. If they were really smart they would make the bike siphon fuel from the very bottom of the tank, my Sportster doesn't and even when I run it empty I can here a decent amount of gas still in there.
 

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3.3 is not bad. I have a Sportster right now with a 3.3 tank. Its not a problem at all. I fill up at around 120 miles. On long trips I just bring a few fuel canisters, although I have never had to use them yet. If they were really smart they would make the bike siphon fuel from the very bottom of the tank, my Sportster doesn't and even when I run it empty I can here a decent amount of gas still in there.
You're just not always at a gas station at mile # 120. I haven't lived out West for many years; but I recall many stretches across deserts where you rode 100+ miles between stops. My favorite ride out on the East Coast is the Blue Ridge Parkway: 460 miles without a gas station. It would be a PITA to have to climb down off the BRP every hundred and hope you have enough left find a little town and fuel up, every couple hours, just when you're getting in the mood. Not saying it's a killer; just saying, yes, it is a problem at all. Apparently, one of the test riding journalists at Sturgis even managed to run out of gas. Not hard to do in the Black Hills, I would think. Even on a road like the PA Turnpike, where off ramps are often 30 miles apart, with toll booths, and the state leased rest stops 50 miles apart sell gas 40 cents higher than reality, this small tank would annoy a traveler. If your typical ride is to the tavern, that's one thing. But if you like to pick up your bags and go find Kentucky for the weekend, that's quite another. Not trying to diss you; but I speak as one for whom a motorcycle is a vehicle, not a toy. 3.3 gallons cramps a lot of riders style.

from the MD review:
Gas mileage among the various journalists I spoke with at the press event varied from roughly 40 mpg to 45 mpg. The 3.3 gallon tank therefore will run dry after approximately 130 to 150 miles. A small warning light on the instrument face comes on with approximately 20 miles left to empty (according to a journalist who ran out of gas during the event).
Still, gotta say, I love the looks and the rest of the specs of this thing. I'm getting on one first time the demo truck comes by. If the seat fits the butt, it's coming to my garage.
 

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My sportster is my commuter and touring bike. I ride all over CA and usually carry extra fuel bottles. Never had to use them, but carrying extra gas is not an issue. If I had the money, owning a second tank would be nice though. I know a few Sportster guys who own aftermarket 5 gallon tanks they swap out when they are doing long rides.
 

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If they made a larger tank the lines would be screwed up. 3.3 is the average size tank for bikes in this category and a 150 miles between fill ups that's very reasonable. Your going to need the break anyway, I know I would and I ride a chieftain. That's 2 1/2 hours in the saddle. But I can see your point if your living out west say Sturgis area.
 

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I am sure it won't be long before someone offers an aftermarket 5 gallon tank for it. It will take some planning so it doesn't screw up the appearance but they will do it. HD did the same thing to the Sportster when people complained about the small tank.

I have the Chieftain. It is a 5.5 gallon tank and I have been getting about 210 from a tank (city/freeway conbination). At my age, that is more miles than my bladder or my butt will tolerate.
 

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Where there is a demand, the free market will reply. I am sure that there will be a tank alternative for the Scout soon enough. There will likely be some more models with this powerplant coming down the pipe in the coming months and year. Perhaps some that are built more for touring than bar hopping.

Look at what the Scout did in the past. It was not their "touring" model. It was a quick, little, scoot that was designed to be light and fast. That is the purpose that it is serving now as well.
 

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I completely agree that the small tank size is a problem. And as I've said before in earlier posts, I don't want to be sweating mile 120 for a gas station. I refuse to believe that adding .7 gallons to round the tank up to 4 gallons would screw with the looks. Let's be honest, increasing the height and width by less than a gallon wouldn't be challenging and certainly wouldn't affect the looks. To the idea that the aftermarket will provide a larger tank for those of us who would actually like to stretch our legs is kind of ridiculous. I like buying a motorcycle knowing that the aftermarket supports my ride, but I don't think I've ever, or ever will, want to buy a bike with the thought I have to change the tank in order for it to fit my needs...that just seems assanine. As the gentleman said earlier "...a motorcycle is a vehicle, not a toy."
 

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I completely agree that the small tank size is a problem. And as I've said before in earlier posts, I don't want to be sweating mile 120 for a gas station. I refuse to believe that adding .7 gallons to round the tank up to 4 gallons would screw with the looks. Let's be honest, increasing the height and width by less than a gallon wouldn't be challenging and certainly wouldn't affect the looks. To the idea that the aftermarket will provide a larger tank for those of us who would actually like to stretch our legs is kind of ridiculous. I like buying a motorcycle knowing that the aftermarket supports my ride, but I don't think I've ever, or ever will, want to buy a bike with the thought I have to change the tank in order for it to fit my needs...that just seems assanine. As the gentleman said earlier "...a motorcycle is a vehicle, not a toy."
In this case, your option would be to step up to the Classic or the Vintage. You will have a bigger bike along with a bigger tank. With 5.5 gallons and 40 - 42 mpg, you will at least double your range. Of course you are also going to be throwing $8 - 10K more at bike purchase.
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing a 4-4.5 Option .. But as long as can Ride a safe without worry 100 mile Range, at my age don't mind a break at 100 mile intervals just make them quick and Keep on Riding .. The Size of the tank wouldn't be a deal breaker for me if really wanted this Bike ..
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing a 4-4.5 Option .. But as long as can Ride a safe without worry 100 mile Range, at my age don't mind a break at 100 mile intervals just make them quick and Keep on Riding .. The Size of the tank wouldn't be a deal breaker for me if really wanted this Bike ..
JayFL, you will be fine with the range spec you mentioned. I got a call from Polaris Customer Service about my "range concern" that I passed along to them a few days ago. The Rep told me they won't be publishing anything on the subject, but she said the range between fill-ups will be between 120 to 140 miles depending on all usual variables (speed, terrain, quality/octane of fuel used, weight, accessories installed, etc). That certainly doesn't stack up against a touring rig, but that's not the targeted audience for the Scout. Hope this helps...
 

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I have a 3.3 gallon tank on my 2004 Sportster Roadster 1200 and I can usually ride 120 miles or a bit more before hitting the reserve, but Sportsters are known for getting pretty decent fuel mileage and I get 50-55 mpg out of the thing most of the time. I don't know what the Scout will do on a gallon of gas, but it's doubtful that it will see 50mpg as an average.

I rode a Scout at Sturgis last week and wrote, in part, this about the low fuel capacity on another forum...

"During the pre-ride 'safety' meeting, someone in the rider group asked how much fuel it's tank held, and the factory guy said 3.3 gallons, to which I said 'Ironically, the same as the Sportster", and I added that that would make it a '100 mile bike', not really meaning it as a complement, and the factory guy said that "yes, it's a 100 mile bike", as if that was a good thing. I then asked why Indian made the tank so small, and that 4.5 gallons would be more useful. He said that they wanted to keep the weight low for entry-level riders for easy handling and all that crap, which is fine, and I stopped my questioning there, but common sense would tell you that if you are uncomfortable with the weight of 4.5 gallons, there's no law against only putting 3.3 gallons in the thing, keeping that weight just as low as the 3.3 gallon tank would, and then you'd have the option of filling it to capacity for longer rides. But I suppose that makes too much sense. I noted that some of the taller male rider's knees were actually above the top of the fuel tank."
 

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Bravo J Backlund! Indian made a most excellent bike and then decided to snatch a flaw from the jaws of perfection. For what it's worth, I'm totally in love with this bike, but that pitiful tank size truly is disgusting!
 

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You know, I set the 360 degree view as my browser default home page, and I keep staring at this design from every angle like it's motorcycle porn. The more I stare at it, the more I get why the tank is so small. It's as though the brass said: "Our mission is to shoehorn a hunnerd horses into as small and nimble and light and pretty of a murdersickle as we can." Printed that on a poster, posted it over the door to the design room. That was Indian's Occam's Razor. That's just what they did. To make the tank bigger and leave the bike the same size, you'd break the line that jumps from rear axle through the frame piece under the seat over the tank up to the triple tree. It's not like there's any room under the tank above the engine. You'd have to expand everything. Taller seat, bigger frame, longer wheelbase, everything. You could go wider; but spin that 360 around so you're looking from the front or from the back either way and tell me you'd want to do that. Tank is already wider than the seat is already wider than the tail. You'd lose the whole athletic sexy style of it. Like putting a big plow horse's head on a race horse body. Which would you want: Longer? Wider? Taller? Or, just what they aimed at, as small and nimble a beauty as they could shoehorn a hundred horses into?

Don't get me wrong -- I definitely wish the tank were twice the size. Just sayin, more I stare at it, more I get it.

Like Rhonda Rousey. Plenty of power in a hot little package.
 

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I've settled in my mind that I'm okay with 3.3 gallons. That said, why can't we have a "Miles to Empty" toggle on the display??? Those are typically damn accurate and allows me to obsess... Eh... I mean... Know when I should start looking for fuel. ;)
 

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This sounds very similar to what the Harley VRod went through in the first couple of years. It also started as a liquid cooled 1130cc with a really small tank. I think it was in year 3 they added the bigger tank, then went on to add the bigger engine that just popped it into the next insurance bracket for me. I owned one for about 2 hours. My ride since has been an '06 Victory 8-Ball and I've come close to running out of gas, and it gets around 190 miles ('bout 300km) between fuel-ups on the highway. The small tank is the only thing, so far, that has me concerned about this bike. At least this tank should get me from Vancouver to Whistler without having to stop for fuel.

Slivyr
Left Coast, Canada
 

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3.3 is not bad. I have a Sportster right now with a 3.3 tank. Its not a problem at all. I fill up at around 120 miles. On long trips I just bring a few fuel canisters, although I have never had to use them yet. If they were really smart they would make the bike siphon fuel from the very bottom of the tank, my Sportster doesn't and even when I run it empty I can here a decent amount of gas still in there.
I too would like a larger tank, but not too large and destroy the look. The 2014 Sportster comes stock with 4.5 gal tank. Someone mentioned carring extra fuel which could be unsafe.
 

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I agree. When I first looked up the specs the tank size jumped right out. I will not buy this bike for that specific reason. 4.3 gals makes more sense.
Carmine G.
 

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I have never seen a bike with a tank too big. Wish my Chieftan held ten gallons. I carry an auxillary tank on the long western trips for added insurance. The Scout like a Sportster can be shanghai'd for touring duty, but that was not the intent me thinks. Somebody will build a bigger tank and sell them perhaps.
 

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I agree. When I first looked up the specs the tank size jumped right out. I will not buy this bike for that specific reason. 4.3 gals makes more sense.
Carmine G.
Don't get me wrong I am getting a Scout. Biggest bang for the buck and the least amout of compromise (tank size). I hope the after market people will come up with something and I will customize.
 
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