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Discussion Starter #1
About to pull both tires off my roadmaster. I was curious as to what time frame would be a good estimate. Trying to decide if I am going to tackle this after work during the week or if I should wait for the weekend? I am not a mechanic but have done my share of shade tree work. So not a complete noob. From the videos and resources I have seen i would estimate about 2.5 hours. But I don't know if that is realistic or way off. I already got my crow foot for the rear axle and my 6 and 14mm Alan wrenches ready to go.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I blew that up. I ended up taking between 7 and 8 hours disassembling and reassembling. It was much more involved than I anticipated plus first time always goes slower. I could cut. The time down alot now. However, I really missed my estimate. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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If you are talking about simply removing the wheels then I can get both off in around 30 minutes, not seeing where the time is going for you guys. Longest part of the process for me is removing the front mudguard, but that’s only 10 minutes, two minutes to remove brake callipers, 30 seconds to loosen and pull the axle and the wheel drops out. This is assuming you have a suitable lift.

The rear is quicker and easier to come out than the front. Remove LHS cover, remove shock pin circlip, takes less than two minutes, if evap canister is fitted you need to unbolt it, it’s a bit fiddley and can take 5 minutes. Use an M6 bolt to withdraw the shock pin (easier if you use a crowbar or similar under the wheel to gently rock it up and down whilst you pull the shock pin) remove brake caliper then Jack the bike up until the Axle is clear undo it and pull it out, lift belt off the pulley and remove the wheel. No need to remove exhausts, or rear fender sides etc. Indian designed the bikes to make the rear wheel super easy to remove by fitting the removable shock pin.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Impressive, I think it took me so long because it was the first time. And that time was removal and re install. I read about dropping the rear tire and unpinning the shock and started down that road but when I had the top bolt nearly out I kept thinking there could be stored energy in that shock and did not know for sure. Decided against it and went the route I was more familiar with. Thanks for the insight. Next time I will give it a go. I also had lots of trouble with my jack balancing the bike with the weight shifting with each tire removal
 

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I also had lots of trouble with my jack balancing the bike with the weight shifting with each tire removal
I guess I have it easy as I have a table lift with a front wheel clamp, if just removing the rear wheel I use a small platform scissor jack under the rear exhaust cross pipe, the pipe is actually flat by design so it fits level on the jack and bolts direct to the chassis, I jack the bike from here until the shock is fully extended with no load, from here you can pull the pin, the wheel still needs to be on the ground, at this point use a lever to just gently rock the wheel up and down whilst pulling the pin and it should just pop out. When the pin is out continue to jack and the wheel stays grounded whilst the rest of the bike lifts clear giving access to the axel nut. I also use a small trolley jack at this stage with a wooden block on top under the engine just to take a lot of the load off the exhaust.

See pic below, not the RM as Ive now sold it, but my CDH, principle is still the same, this is it secured with the shock pin pulled, note no removal of fenders or exhaust. For the RM obviously remove tour pack and panniers to reduce the weight.

IMG_2445.jpg


Similar principal for the front end:

IMG_2442.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Having the right tools makes all the difference. I had to get my wife to hold down the back of the bike as I removed the front tire because the bike and jack wanted to tilt toward the front until ibgot the front tire off. The tires and rims significantly change the center of gravity.
 

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Having the right tools makes all the difference. I had to get my wife to hold down the back of the bike as I removed the front tire because the bike and jack wanted to tilt toward the front until ibgot the front tire off. The tires and rims significantly change the center of gravity.
Yes they do. When I was doing tire changes on the RM I would do one tire at a time and put a stack of blocks under the wheel that I was not working on to help stabilize everything. Got the lift table now and it even has a drop out plate for the rear tire to make changes even easier. Dean
 
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