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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With apps like Dash and Torque and an OBD adapter in my car, I can get lots of cool stats and stuff from my cars.

Since our Indians have an ECU, does anyone know if it has an OBD port on it that I can stick my OBD adapter on and use Dash or Torque or whatever?
 

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Howdy Bryan,
There's a port behind the left side cover. All of the hardware is off the shelf stuff as commonly used in automotive applications. The software is proprietary. As to whether your apps will give you useful results, I couldn't say. Keep us posted...
--- Randall
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No good. I've upload three pics below. First two are the ports on either of the side panels on the Indian. The last one is the standard OBDII module I have in our car that works with Dash and Torque. Bummer.

IMG_20141204_201018199.jpg IMG_20141204_201217480.jpg IMG_20141204_201422789.jpg
 

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FYI: The "Indian Rides" iOS/Android App (which is pretty cool, btw) has a "Gauges" section that says there is something called "Polaris Link" that will be available soon. My OBDII adapter I have in the car was like $15. My guess is that "Polaris Link" will be something like $199. :)
 

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Polaris/Indian has a special cable and software called "Digital Wrench" that plugs into that socket. They only provide it to dealers/distributors.
Yup, looks nothing like OBD saw em use it on mine yesterday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My originally post says OBD (though I corrected it in later posts to OBDII), and pioneerscot called it OBD in his response as well, so I think Shuje Sunge was just clarifying that it's OBDII, not OBD. But, that's just a guess. :)
 

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yeah, that's what I meant. Was banging through threads and thought I'd clarify which OBD system.
 

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Good morning,
I guess I understand why manufacturers try to use proprietary software and hook-ups, but I think its ultimately counterproductive. Motorcyclists historically are the kind of folks who maintain, modify, and hop up their vehicles. It is pointless for the manufacturers to try to frustrate this, the aftermarket will soon come out with hook-ups, programming devices, and software so that the systems can be accessed. I bought a cable/port hook-up and diagnostic software from a company in Florida, so I could access the systems on my '09 FLHX, for a few hundred dollars. You have to use a system like that to do something as simple as bleeding the brakes on an ABS-equipped machine; the solenoid valves in the ABS module have to be electronically triggered to purge all of the air from the lines. I'm sure the aftermarket will supply similar products for Indian soon. It would make more sense for the manufacturers to sell their own diagnostic and tuning packages, although I suppose there are liability concerns.
--- Randall
 

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It would be nice to find aftermarket software. I am a retired Automotive tech and can diagnose and repair my own vehicles..Except my Chieftain
 

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So I realize this is an old thread, but a little information never hurt anybody and now I'm curious.

A few background details:

OBD-II is a communication standard among car manufacturers for diagnostics, started in like 1997ish. It allows you to pick up things like emissions and MIL light codes - the sort of thing you'd get from borrowing an AutoZone scanner and reading from your car if your check engine light is on. Things like P0104 - Mass Air Flow Circuit Intermittent is about all you'd get out of such an error code. You'd have to look up the code to determine the fault, and even then its usually tricky to hunt down the real culprit.

More modern cars (2007ish) use something called a CAN (close area network), as well as OBD-II. Think of the CAN as a stock ticker of information. Your crank position sensor sends its signal data to your ECM, and then the ECM broadcasts that information on the CAN in a continuously updated loop. Any other device that needs that information just has to be able to recognize the unique identifier right before the information and it could read what it needs and perform its function. For example, a (very short) CAN stream could look like " COOLANT - 176 - RPM - 3500 - VEHICLE SPEED - 70...COOLANT - 177 - RPM - 3550 - VEHICLE SPEED - 72..." etc etc as it updates. This CAN data is where Torque and Dash ( and I'd bet Digital Wrench and the Indian Rides 'Gauges' bit) all get their information. I just picked up a scanner that lets me read this stuff live, as it has CAN monitoring. When I plug in to my DLC port (the j1962 port, the trapezoidal 16 pin port in the far right picture Bryan posted) I see things like Engine Coolant Temperature and Oil Pressure (the CAN stuff), as well as any stored, pending, or permanent error codes the system might have (the OBD-II stuff).

Now the relevant part:

This all matters because to get CAN data on a cheapo device that doesn't have a battery, you need 5 pins in your connector: CAN-High, CAN-Low, +12v (from key on), Signal Ground, and Chassis Ground (which honestly can sometimes be tied in to the same ground). If I'm counting occupied pins correctly in the first picture Bryan posted, its got 5 pins occupied. The connector itself is a Metripack GT 150 female (which can readily be had online at Mouser or someplace. You'd need male pins, seals, a male connector, and a not inexpensive crimp tool to build the harness, as well as the female pins and the body for the j1962 16 pin, but the crimper works for those pins as well. $70 crimper, $20 total in parts), and I'd bet my dinner those 5 pins match up to a CAN network plug in some configuration. Indian has no legal reason to standardize a connector, so why would they not keep it proprietary and make you pay for diagnostic service?

I'll maybe break my meter out and check, connect up my scanner and see what I get (I'm assuming my scout has a similar connector, I think I saw one). I'm making no promises and I'm not an Indian insider, but it could just be a matter of getting the right five wires matched up to plug in to your scan tool.
 

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FYI: The "Indian Rides" iOS/Android App (which is pretty cool, btw) has a "Gauges" section that says there is something called "Polaris Link" that will be available soon. My OBDII adapter I have in the car was like $15. My guess is that "Polaris Link" will be something like $199. :)
If you're lucky. I bet it'll be closer to $499 or $599
 

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No good. I've upload three pics below. First two are the ports on either of the side panels on the Indian. The last one is the standard OBDII module I have in our car that works with Dash and Torque. Bummer.

View attachment 3703 View attachment 3704 View attachment 3705
Old post, and you might already have an answer to this. The larger plug is your data port. The only way I know of to access it is through the dealer or through a third party flash device like a Powervision CX. Not sure what the smaller plug on the right side of the motorcycle is for.
 

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the plug on the right (and there's another on the left besides that data port) is to connect to the saddle bags,
 

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I know that this is quite old post but just to close the subject:

our scouts use the standard OBD2 protocol. The diagnostic connector is of GT150 type ( same as used for throttle position sensor in some GM cars- I bought used plug for 5USD delivered). Based on wiring diagram from service manual (first image) I made s simple adapter and connected to simple, cheap ELM327 OBD2 (cost- 4USD) reader as shown on the photo (second image). It reads all the statuses without any problem (error codes, throttle position, RPMs and many others).

Of course- I use it only for diagnostic purposes.
 

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The diagnostic connector is of GT150 type ( same as used for throttle position sensor in some GM cars- I bought used plug for 5USD delivered).
I will be making one of these for sure now. Found an plug kit just now for 10 bucks, haven't checked ebay or alibaba for cheaper yet.


I appreciate your effort and testing.
 
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