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I'm a rider not a wrencher, so please excuse my ignorance on this topic. I purchased my 19' SF Dark Horse w/ the 116 BBK. After reading the owners manual and as many forum threads on engine oil. The one thing that I did not find in either of those mentioned sources is requirements for the 116 BBK, do they follow the same requirements as far as Oil specification grade 20W-40 (manual actually says Indian 20W-40 for 111 Engine). For those that are Mechanically experienced, would greatly appreciate your insight.
 

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Either Indian oil is fine (20w-40 or 15w-60). And I have used both in my 116.
 

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I would not, never, ever run 20w-40 oil in a BBK engine unless I lived above the arctic circle. Did I say never. JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would not, never, ever run 20w-40 oil in a BBK engine unless I lived above the arctic circle. Did I say never. JMHO
Ironbutt70 could you tell me why? Not trying to start a battle of opinions, but would be appreciative of what you have experienced or researched that would provide insight to your opinion. Do you have a 116 BBK? If Yes, what do you use?
 

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Eeyore,

Why have you used the 15w-60?
I had two leftover Scout oil change kits, Indian approved it for use in Thunderstroke engines, it is a full synthetic, has slightly lower cold weight, and Indian recommended it as a solution to my hard starting issues.
 

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Ironbutt70 could you tell me why? Not trying to start a battle of opinions, but would be appreciative of what you have experienced or researched that would provide insight to your opinion. Do you have a 116 BBK? If Yes, what do you use?
Just to let you know that these are just my opinions gleaned from 58 years and probably now close to 1 million miles on 2 wheels. Putting 40w oil in an air cooled engine is just a bad idea unless you live where the ambient air temp never goes above 50F. Especially a V-twin where the rear cylinder runs much hotter than the front and when the engine and tranny share the same oil. Newer synthetics are much better at operating at higher temps and pressures but 40w is still 40w. (I also believe any V-twin air cooled engine should have a thermostatically controlled oil cooler but that's another debate) This is the oil I've used for years and I highly recommend it. Before that is was Redline 20w60. I do not have an Indian at this time but when I did I used the Liqui-Moly. (Don"t be fooled by the name. It doesn't contain any molybdenum.)
 

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I had two leftover Scout oil change kits, Indian approved it for use in Thunderstroke engines, it is a full synthetic, has slightly lower cold weight, and Indian recommended it as a solution to my hard starting issues.
Indian told you that going from 20w-xx to 10w-xx would help with your hard starting issues? Can't say I ever heard that one before. Did it actually help?
 

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For the inexperienced gentlemen [ladies] on here,the first number,the 20 in this case,represents the viscosity [weight] of the oil when cold,[so it can flow thru the motor quicker [faster lubrication].The second number,the 40,,represents the weight of the oil once it reaches operating temperature so it will maintain a decent lubrication after the motor reaches its' operating temperature.
Myself,I don't use synthetic in ANYTHING I own,my bike included! Why?? Because there is no viscosity,atleast that I can feel when rubbing it between my fingers,cold or hot,not to mention,I was hearing strange metallic noises which are not good for any engine,especially when first started.
But with conventional dino oil,I can feel viscosity when rubbing it between my fingers,cold or hot,unlike with the synthetic stuff,meaning,it should have better lubrication qualities,plus,I do NOT hear those engine noises anymore.
And my understanding of the "WHY" synthetic oils were developed to begin with ,was for "EMMISSIONS" purposes,NOT superior lubrication.But whada I know?? I'm just a dumb Polock!! :eek: :rolleyes:
Now,I'm NOT saying NOT TO USE the synthetic stuff,cause that's up to the individual!! Use whatever YOU feel is better for your particular application!!(y)


And the dealerships HAVE TO USE it because that's what the factory requires em to use.And if they don't,they won't have a job for very long!! But once the vehicle is out of warantee,then all bets are off.
 

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lol here we go the oil thing. It depends on how you ride. I run 20w60 Redline have for years in my Harleys. But I tour a lot in the summer months 2up and loaded down. I run an oil temp gauge and proved to myself that the bike runs cooler on it. These pushrod air cooled motors run to hot in my opinion for a 20w40 oil. Hell if you run long and hard 20w50 in my eyes don’t cut it either. Just my experience from trial running them. If you just riding a 250 mile radius of home you can maybe get away with it. But in a 116” I still wouldn’t I’d roll the 60 myself. I’m just laying it out there because I’ve had excellent results with the 20w60. I’ve got a Harley with 112,000 on a rebuild don’t use a drop of oil still. I also run it in my indian. I’ve run coast to coast and El Paso strait thru to Chicago with minimal consumption on my indian. Larry s on here has over 300,000 on his chieftain and runs the same. That right there is all the proof you need that the 60 works well. But it is your bike and it boils down to what works for you and how you ride. Oil tires and seats will always give you numerous different opinions. But remember we all ride a bit different and when it comes to the 3 things I just mentioned. What works for someone else doesn’t necessarily work for you. But asking lol and all the different answers can leave you scratching your head at times.
 

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Indian told you that going from 20w-xx to 10w-xx would help with your hard starting issues? Can't say I ever heard that one before. Did it actually help?
Yes they did and not enough to really help with my hard starting...
 

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Yes they did and not enough to really help with my hard starting...
I’m not surprised the lower viscosity oil did nothing for the hard starting but I wanted to check before I said they fed you a line of BS. What they told you is total 100% grade A all American BS. Hard starting is usually 1 of 3 things. #1 Lose or corroded battery terminals. #2 A battery On its way out or #3 a problem with the starter. If it was a dealer that laid that BS on you I would be looking for a dealer that has a clue/is honest with you. Next thing you’ll hear is they all do that.
 

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I’m not surprised the lower viscosity oil did nothing for the hard starting but I wanted to check before I said they fed you a line of BS. What they told you is total 100% grade A all American BS. Hard starting is usually 1 of 3 things. #1 Lose or corroded battery terminals. #2 A battery On its way out or #3 a problem with the starter. If it was a dealer that laid that BS on you I would be looking for a dealer that has a clue/is honest with you. Next thing you’ll hear is they all do that.
My problem is #4... problems with the 116 BBK.... but lets not side track this oil thread, the OP just wanted now the reasons I used 15w-60.
 

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My problem is #4... problems with the 116 BBK.... but lets not side track this oil thread, the OP just wanted now the reasons I used 15w-60.
Look for a 500 CCA battery and you should be good to go.
 

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Look for a 500 CCA battery and you should be good to go.
Have one, made no difference with my issues. To make a very long story short, just about everything that can done, has been, short of a new motor/bike. There are a few threads where I posted all the details.
 

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Harley has roller bearings on it's moving parts,does not need oil pressure,
Indian and most other bikes use flat automotive bearings,and use pressure for the bearings to ride on.
That's why Harley's can use 60 wt or 70 wt oils,no problem.
Automotive style bearings have very tight clearances.if you try to push a high viscosity oil through , especially when cold and you could put too much pressure on that plastic pump gear.
In the end it's your bike ,use what ya want,but I've heard my lifters start ticking on 50 wt early one cold morning.40 wt it doesn't do that.
So I run 20 50 in the summer.
 
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