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Last evening I took the seat off my Chieftain to clean it and install the Tank Pouch i purchased. When I went to put the seat back on the right side (as you are seated) seat bolt wouldn't go back in. I have the holes in the seat lined up but I couldn't get the bolt started. Has anyone else had this issue? I have my first service scheduled for Saturday and will have them look at it.
 

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I've had that. Just try taking it off, and reinstalling again. It takes a little finesse.
 

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Had a similar situation, ended up using a thread file and cleaned up the first couple of threads on the bolt, it went right in after that. All it takes is a small bur and it will be a ***** getting it back in.
 

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I have not experienced the problem, but others have reported on it. Steel bolt in soft cast aluminum, eventually someone will likely cross-thread the bolt. I would very carefully inspect the bolt and run it through some steel nuts (or a proper die) to confirm its threads are perfect. Then, on to the most likely culprit. Aluminum threads can easily be damaged and will need careful attention to avoid further damage. I would look at it closely, and if there was any thread damage, probably run a tap through it. Worst case scenario, install a Heli-coil.
 

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Also note that using lock-tight or similar is not a good idea. It seems like a good way to prevent the bolt from vibrating out. However, it will gall up easily and become very difficult to get the bolt out later. If it happens or the bolt is difficult to get out for any reason, you turn the bolt in and out until the chunk of debris in the thread is spread out a little. If you drop the steel bolt onto the floor, it can cause enough damage to the thread to be difficult to put back in. Make sure you keep the bolt threads clean and undamaged. You might want to put them in safe deposit box or a velvet bag while working on your bike.
 

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Anti-seize is a better choice for bolt threads in dissimilar metals that are frequently removed and replaced.
 

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Yes anti seize is good. I will further explain why. Dissimilar metals given a liquid medium such as water (with minerals), acid, or Lock Tight will begin a process of electrolysis. It is actually a tiny battery. During this process some of the metal transfers from one to the other but ends up in between and forms globs that prevent the bolt from turning.
 

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An alternative to anti seize I'll use in some instances is paste wax, same stuff used to wax bike, truck, car, etc. It prolly doesn't have the properties to fight electrolysis Marcus mentions, but it helps the steel bolt into aluminum hole thing.
 

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Oddly enough I too have the same issue with my Roadmaster- only the right side seat bolt. I’ll try the anti-seize.
 

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If you accidentally ruin the hole in the bike, there is a solution. The hole can be enlarged a little and re-tapped for a bigger bolt. You don't want to go bigger than the seat bracket will allow. Have this done by someone that truly knows what they are doing. Then again you need to keep your bolt in top condition. We are starting a "Reconditioning Camp for Bolts" Each bolt will be filed down to give a slight taper at the end and clean all burrs. The owner must also attend 2 hours of classes on how to care for their new bolt.
 

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If you accidentally ruin the hole in the bike, there is a solution. The hole can be enlarged a little and re-tapped for a bigger bolt. You don't want to go bigger than the seat bracket will allow. Have this done by someone that truly knows what they are doing. Then again you need to keep your bolt in top condition. We are starting a "Reconditioning Camp for Bolts" Each bolt will be filed down to give a slight taper at the end and clean all burrs. The owner must also attend 2 hours of classes on how to care for their new bolt.
Use a Helicoil insert rather than a larger bolt.
 

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I had the same issue but with the rear fender on my scout - not my chieftain - while putting rear bags on.
The original bolts had lock tight on them; when removing the bolts some of the lock tight gummed up the threads.
I just re-tapped the holes carefully with the same thread as on the bike to clean them out.
Surprisingly I also cleaned out a few metal burrs assumed left behind from factory. Once I re-tapped to clean out the holes, the bolts went in perfectly.
 

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I stripped just the first couple threats by trying to use a T-handle. I re-tapped it with (M8 x 1.25) I think. Now I never thread the bolt with anything but my fingers. Easy to do in that aluminum.
 

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Last evening I took the seat off my Chieftain to clean it and install the Tank Pouch i purchased. When I went to put the seat back on the right side (as you are seated) seat bolt wouldn't go back in. I have the holes in the seat lined up but I couldn't get the bolt started. Has anyone else had this issue? I have my first service scheduled for Saturday and will have them look at it.
Like I used to tell my apprentices, if this work was easy, anybody could do it!
 
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