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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that since the Chief and Springfield have almost the same geometry.

Other than the saddlebags I’m trying to see if there are big differences between the Springfield (111cu) vs Vintage DH. For me I don’t know if it’s worth spending the extra for the Springfield.


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Just go to f&b and look for yourself. Off the top of my head rear crash bars, passenger boards, rear seat, windshield, gvwr is higher vs regular vintage, and imo better paint color combos.
 

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For me I don’t know if it’s worth spending the extra for the Springfield.
The main question to ask yourself is, 'Do I want hard bags on the bike, either now or in the future?'

Highway bars and windshield are add-ons and available as accessories. The hard bags are not. They are sold as a collection of separate parts - each lock, hinge, lid, box, etc has a different part number and is sold separately. To buy the official hard bags is very expensive. There are, however, ebay bags that people here have bought and say they are identical to OEM.

Indian does sell the leather bags as accessories as a single unit, just add in the mounting hardware to suit your bike.

Another thing to check is steering geometry. Although all the bikes are 'almost' the same, there are differences. When I was deciding between a previous year's model Chief and adding things compared to the newly released Springfield DH, the different front wheel and rake/trail made the handling more nimble. That was December 2017 and I went for the new model.

I believe that Indian has rationalized the front end of bikes across the range since then so more bikes share the Springfield DH geometry. The classic look Springfield used to have very high front tire pressure or the bike could set up bad steering wobbles.

Another difference when I was buying was the rear shock - spring preload on one and air shock on the other. I believe they've since put an air shock on the lower end bikes but the Springfield and RM get a different 'touring' shock, whatever that means. Something else to check to see if the extra cost is justified.
 

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Do you run only local ? Or do you take weekend rides to get away. I’d say your riding habits are what’s going to be the decision maker. Which works best for your style of riding. Another is solo or 2up
 

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I was at this point when I was looking at Indian, either a Vintage or a SF(not DH). I chose the SF for a few reasons.

1. Locking hard bags instead of soft non-locking bags on the vintage.
2. Passenger floorboards instead of pegs on the vintage.
3. Mustache crash bars instead of the D shaped crash bars on the vintage.
4. Higher GVWR 125 lbs more than the vintage.
5. More rear suspension travel and air adjustable shock.
6. Rear crash bars on the SF. Vintage had none.

SF was at the time built on the touring frame and the Vintage was on the cruiser frame. Now I think they are the same.

Personally I would go with the SF(regular NOT DH) if you want the most bike for your money. I did and it has been a great bike. You will not have to add anything to it like you would the DH.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The main question to ask yourself is, 'Do I want hard bags on the bike, either now or in the future?'

Highway bars and windshield are add-ons and available as accessories. The hard bags are not. They are sold as a collection of separate parts - each lock, hinge, lid, box, etc has a different part number and is sold separately. To buy the official hard bags is very expensive. There are, however, ebay bags that people here have bought and say they are identical to OEM.

Indian does sell the leather bags as accessories as a single unit, just add in the mounting hardware to suit your bike.

Another thing to check is steering geometry. Although all the bikes are 'almost' the same, there are differences. When I was deciding between a previous year's model Chief and adding things compared to the newly released Springfield DH, the different front wheel and rake/trail made the handling more nimble. That was December 2017 and I went for the new model.

I believe that Indian has rationalized the front end of bikes across the range since then so more bikes share the Springfield DH geometry. The classic look Springfield used to have very high front tire pressure or the bike could set up bad steering wobbles.

Another difference when I was buying was the rear shock - spring preload on one and air shock on the other. I believe they've since put an air shock on the lower end bikes but the Springfield and RM get a different 'touring' shock, whatever that means. Something else to check to see if the extra cost is justified.
To your point i like the look and protection of the hardbags but I don’t necessarily need them. Most of my trips are weekend/overnight. I tend to do more day trips.


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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you run only local ? Or do you take weekend rides to get away. I’d say your riding habits are what’s going to be the decision maker. Which works best for your style of riding. Another is solo or 2up
Weekend it can be both local and get away. All riding at this point is solo.


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@Cras Obviously by the Avatar that you have, you have already made your choice. Nothing we say here will change your mind. Go to the IM site and compare both models and what you get for YOUR money. Above I gave you the reasons I went with the SF. You are going to find on any DH model you get less for your money but if that is what you are set on then go with it.

Are you ever going to ride two up? If you are then you better purchase pegs or floor boards when you buy it along with a passenger seat because you get none of that on the Vintage DH.

Good Luck!
 
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