Indian Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many here are running Darkside on the rear of thier Roadmaster?
What Brand, series, size? and at what pressure?

Please for those who dont run darkside, do not comment with your thoughts of danger etc... Dont need your drama

The question is directed to riders that are actually currently running a car tire on the rear of their Roadmaster.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
965 Posts
How many here are running Darkside on the rear of thier Roadmaster?
What Brand, series, size? and at what pressure?

Please for those who dont run darkside, do not comment with your thoughts of danger etc... Dont need your drama

The question is directed to riders that are actually currently running a car tire on the rear of their Roadmaster.
Hey,I’ll bite lol. I’m not Darksiding on my RM although I would be but the E4’s and Commander ll’s I’ve ran have lasted close to 20k miles with no cupping, noticeable noise, etc.. so have stuck to bike tires lately . I ran car tires on my last Harley, Victory Vision and Gold Wing in years past. The last car tire I ran was a Bridgestone 195/55r16 run flat mud and snow with great results which should fit the RM just fine. I ran a Michelin Alpin Primacy but that tire was discontinued. I’ll be trading in on a Challenger Dark Horse here in a couple of months and depending on things may go back to darksiding, who knows.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lugnut1009

·
Rider
Joined
·
574 Posts
I’ve never understood the logic behind “dark side” what in the hell do you gain other than mileage? The profile for car tires doesn’t account for lean angle at all. Am I missing something? So buy an expensive bike and save minimal amount of scratch on tires? Seriously, explain the thought process, my brain ain’t putting anything logical together to explain why this is a good idea.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
so i am dark side on my chieftain and will be soon on my roadmaster. what did i gain well a ct has a higher load rating than a mt i have far better traction in wet and dry conditions, the tar snakes in the road do not make the bike dance around, I no longer have to put a new tire on every other month, the $ factor and i didnt loose any handling. The ride is way smoother as well. plus if you run a runflat you wont be stranded you can get to a place for help.
now if you read the post it said if you dont run dark side dont reply he doesnt need your drama. I do live in kansas so the sharpest corner i take are pulling into my driveway, but i have road all the rides in sturgis and in arkansas and was able to drag floorboards through the corners.
i am pretty sure that i would be able to keep up with you if we were both on the same touring bike in the dry and if it was wet id be able to leave you behind.
The lean angle on these touring ikes is nowhere near a crotch rocket.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
965 Posts
I’ve never understood the logic behind “dark side” what in the hell do you gain other than mileage? The profile for car tires doesn’t account for lean angle at all. Am I missing something? So buy an expensive bike and save minimal amount of scratch on tires? Seriously, explain the thought process, my brain ain’t putting anything logical together to explain why this is a good idea.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Apparently you didn’t read all of the OP’s post. No drama from the peanut gallery lol. Before passing judgement have you ever ran a car tire? I’m guessing no. How many miles are you putting down per year? Do you ride enough to have to change out 2 sometimes 3, a new front every other year on the average. I mount my own so cost has really no bearing for me but some long haul fellers who rely entirely on a shop find darksiding the wat to go. Especially Gold Wingers, those things eat up tires especially riding 2 up pulling a trailer. So other than cost and longevity what are the other pluses: Perhaps my biggest reason might be the run flat aspect. Have you ever witnessed the aftermath of a high speed rear tire blow out, bead unseating and tire balling up underneath the rider A few years ago We had just come down off of Pike’s Peak, outside of Colorado Springs, Co. Came up to the seen of an accident being cleaned up a Harley Ultra, thankfully the rider and passenger had already been taken away. The cop said take a look at the rear wheel, no doubt what happened. Maybe it was under inflated, maybe a tire defect, who knows? All I know is I felt a whole lot more at ease running a car tire. TPMS is highly recommended as you may not know you’re tire is flat. 2nd: Riding in heavy rains, even snow, IMO no comparison. 3rd: braking to me it’s unbelievable the difference. 4th smoother, softer ride 28-38 lbs of air. Even with the run lat side walls. Now to lean angle and cornering, we’ve all seen the video and granted it does look a little fright full. But if you put your nose right down to the ground% and look at the actual contact patch of both there isnt really much difference IMO.
Now would I slap a car tire on a Honda CBR 1000RR and run the Isle of Mann TT, probably not.The maps below show some of my riding last summer. I’m guessing 70-75% on interstate, straight highways. Back to braking, traction, handling in rain. I’m saying a car tire’s safer. I’ve ridden all kinds of twisties incl Tenn 141, The Dragon , Angeles Natl Forest. Sisters, Or, Pikes Peak, Million Dollar Highway, Up and down both coasts most several times over several years with no handling issues on a car tire. Nor have any of my dark side acquaintances that I know of. The only thing that takes some getting used to is low speed maneuvering such as a rutty dirt road or deep pavement grooves in a work zone, but you learn how to cope
 

Attachments

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,975 Posts
Ok, there’s a reason tire manufacturers make different tires for different applications. Tractors, sports cars, trucks, airplanes, motorcycles, etc., all have different requirements. MC tires have a significantly harder/stiff sidewall than car tires...why? Because motorcycles use the sides of their tires to corner and turn. Secondly, the bead surface on a car tire is very different than a motorcycle bead, so only a small portion of a car tire‘s bead is making contact with a motorcycle’s rim. Is that what you want in a 45 mph turn? Thirdly, look at the tread pattern of a car tire VS a bike tire...car tires push the water away vertically, a bike tire pushes water away vertically/horizontally, at a 45 degree angle. A lot of science and engineering goes into tire development. But by all means, run that car tire on your motorcycle because you saved $45. Lastly, for the dark siders...if you enjoy running car tires so much, why don’t you ever run one on the front?
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
574 Posts
Apparently you didn’t read all of the OP’s post. No drama from the peanut gallery lol. Before passing judgement have you ever ran a car tire? I’m guessing no. How many miles are you putting down per year? Do you ride enough to have to change out 2 sometimes 3, a new front every other year on the average. I mount my own so cost has really no bearing for me but some long haul fellers who rely entirely on a shop find darksiding the wat to go. Especially Gold Wingers, those things eat up tires especially riding 2 up pulling a trailer. So other than cost and longevity what are the other pluses: Perhaps my biggest reason might be the run flat aspect. Have you ever witnessed the aftermath of a high speed rear tire blow out, bead unseating and tire balling up underneath the rider A few years ago We had just come down off of Pike’s Peak, outside of Colorado Springs, Co. Came up to the seen of an accident being cleaned up a Harley Ultra, thankfully the rider and passenger had already been taken away. The cop said take a look at the rear wheel, no doubt what happened. Maybe it was under inflated, maybe a tire defect, who knows? All I know is I felt a whole lot more at ease running a car tire. TPMS is highly recommended as you may not know you’re tire is flat. 2nd: Riding in heavy rains, even snow, IMO no comparison. 3rd: braking to me it’s unbelievable the difference. 4th smoother, softer ride 28-38 lbs of air. Even with the run lat side walls. Now to lean angle and cornering, we’ve all seen the video and granted it does look a little fright full. But if you put your nose right down to the ground% and look at the actual contact patch of both there isnt really much difference IMO.
Now would I slap a car tire on a Honda CBR 1000RR and run the Isle of Mann TT, probably not.The maps below show some of my riding last summer. I’m guessing 70-75% on interstate, straight highways. Back to braking, traction, handling in rain. I’m saying a car tire’s safer. I’ve ridden all kinds of twisties incl Tenn 141, The Dragon , Angeles Natl Forest. Sisters, Or, Pikes Peak, Million Dollar Highway, Up and down both coasts most several times over several years with no handling issues on a car tire. Nor have any of my dark side acquaintances that I know of. The only thing that takes some getting used to is low speed maneuvering such as a rutty dirt road or deep pavement grooves in a work zone, but you learn how to cope
Good explanation, thanks. I understand why some folks would do this now. I won’t be joining you, but I get it now.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
965 Posts
Ok, there’s a reason tire manufacturers make different tires for different applications. Tractors, sports cars, trucks, airplanes, motorcycles, etc., all have different requirements. MC tires have a significantly harder/stiff sidewall than car tires...why? Because motorcycles use the sides of their tires to corner and turn. Secondly, the bead surface on a car tire is very different than a motorcycle bead, so only a small portion of a car tire‘s bead is making contact with a motorcycle’s rim. Is that what you want in a 45 mph turn? Thirdly, look at the tread pattern of a car tire VS a bike tire...car tires push the water away vertically, a bike tire pushes water away vertically/horizontally, at a 45 degree angle. A lot of science and engineering goes into tire development. But by all means, run that car tire on your motorcycle because you saved $45. Lastly, for the dark siders...if you enjoy running car tires so much, why don’t you ever run one on the front?
Lastly, for the dark siders...if you enjoy running car tires so much, why don’t you ever run one on the front?
Tough to find one that you can squeeze between the fork lowers lol. What you do is take a rear sport bike tire like Bridgestone Battlax BT45 and mount it. Some prefer running it backwards. That’s called “double darksiding”
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
965 Posts
Good explanation, thanks. I understand why some folks would do this now. I won’t be joining you, but I get it now.
And that would be the attitude to have. Running a car tire is nothing new, I ran a 15" Michelin radial on my Harley back in the 70's-80's and I'm still here, heck I didn't even run a front brake. I rode this bike for 12 years through just about every state west of the Mississippi. To each his own.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I have heard about running car tires when I was on the Honda forum when I had my VTX. I never put a car tire on it, or now that I have my Roadmaster. But wouldn't necessarily be opposed. Howver, I would be most curious about slow speed maneuvers and it's effect. Executing U turns, turns from a stop slow race, etc.
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
4,171 Posts
Ran a card fire out back when I had my Kawi 2000. That bike was a beast and ate up back tires. My Metzler 880 would only last about 5k and that was normal riding. Tires got pretty expensive on that ride. Ran a Michelin Pilot Exalto. Uni directional tread and a well rounded corners. You can actually run more contact patch with it than a regular motorcycle tire. The secret is to find the right tire pressure so the tire flexes in the turn without having it start walking on you when you roll on the power. It is not for everyone but I felt very comfortable doing it on that bike. No regrets, would get 25k easily before even coming close to th wear marks. With that being said it does effect handling. Not bad but you ended up muscling the bike into the turns. The bike always wanted to pick upright when leaning it over especially when taking a turn with some speed. Never considered it with my RM. The bike handles like a deam. Don't want a car fire messing with that. Been riding Michelin Commander 2s. Now that the 3s are out you can find the 2s pretty cheap. Nit even sure the Exaltos are even made anymore but they made for a good dark side tire. Dean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
I want to hear more about the darkside on RM's. I am hesitant to make the switch, but very curious at the same time. I have a 100K miles on my RM in less than 3 years. It would be nice to be able to ride more miles on a set of tires. I am also concerned about getting a flat on the highway. I took a 2,500 mile trip in Mexico and we went through lots of road construction. Riding on smooth asphalt then road construction and you are riding on dirt and gravel for 20 miles. I would think that car tires would handle that better and have less of a chance of getting a flat. I am also planning to ride up to Prudhoe Bay and there are lots of gravel miles on the Dalton Hwy.
I want to know what brand tires and sizes are being used and what problems did you encounter getting a tire shop to mount and balance them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I plan to go dark side on my CDH once this tire wears out for sure. Always a fan of the Bridgestone DG run flat on my other bikes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lugnut1009

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
Keep us updated on how they perform and your thoughts. Never went darkside, but always curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
my roadmaster is dnts
arkside now i guess it and my chieftain are double dark. i love it but i came from choppers with 260 and 280 back tires so i love the way it handles the way it rides i have no complai
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
No one has responded as to what brand and size they are running.
185/55r-16 radial. I've used different brands. All are under $70 bucks a tire. All worked to my satisfaction. Get around 10k miles. I ride hard and fast if that makes a difference. Most riders will get more mileage. I buy whatever's cheapest on Amazon and install myself. I've used 195/60r-16 also. Felt it was a little tall. I ride a lot of twisty's in Northern PA and car tires work just fine. Almost 40k miles on car tires so far on my RM.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top