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What damage would come from riding with the belt tension quite a bit too tight? Front pulley bearing, rear wheel bearing? what signs would show if any damage was done? Would riding for 3000 miles with the belt to tight be enough to cause damage?
 

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Good questions. And you've listed most of what might be expected. The bearings at both ends would be subjected to excessive loads that may shorten their life. How quickly would they be damaged? I DUNNO. But I would expect that it would depend on how TIGHT the belt was. Still, I expect that the belt would suffer faster. The embedded fibers may break sooner than the bearings will show damage. If that happens, the belt may break or suddenly loosen if it starts to stretch.
Mind you, I have never seen such damage on any belt driven motorcycle that I've ridden or worked on and that's been a lot of different bikes (mine AND customers') over the years. The modern drive belts are VERY tough. I have had riders come to my shop with belts that had NO SLACK at all and after adjusting them, they went down the road and continued to do their job. I'm sure it happens, but I've never seen a broken drive belt or had to replace bearings that were damaged from a too tight belt.
Maybe some of the wrenches that currently work in a franchised shop will chime in with their experiences.
 

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It can and will damage,if not destroy, the bearings in the rear wheel hub,as well as the swing arm bearings.And if allowed to stay that way,it could also damage the transmission bearing which the front cog rides on,which will be a major expense to repair.So if that's what ya have, loosen the belts' tension,ASAP.Ya want atleast an inch of up and down movement at the belts tightest point,when the belt is cold.As the belt heats up,that free play will decrease,hence that inch or so of free play will also decrease and the belts' tension should then be with in spec .
 

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Indian says the bike should be cold for the adjustment. Thoughts on how long the bike needs to sit for that? Certainly not overnight I would think?
On my Scout, I set it about 1/16 greater than specs call for (with rear wheel off the round) and when the bike is warm and on the sidestand it is rather tight.
 

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I won't touch my belt until the motor is cold,which by then,so is the belt.Remember,as the belt heats up,it contracts because,unlike rubber which expands,it's kevlar, which does just the opposite after usage.Experience is a great teacher and I learned all about belt drives when I owned my Triumph which was the first belt drive machine I have ever owned,and believe me when I tell ya, I went thru hell and high water until I finally broke the code!! Now I can apply that knowledge to this machine ,or any belt drive machine,as well.Dumber then a door knob,Dave!!! ;) :)
 

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Properties of Kevlar intrigue me so I found the DuPont technical guide for Kevlar.

From page 13:
Kevlar® has a very small, negative coefficient of thermal expansion
(CTE) in the longitudinal direction. The value of the CTE of
Kevlar® is dependent on measuring technique, sample preparation
and test method

 

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Tomorrow I will be replacing the rear tire again at the 33,000 mile mark.This will be number three,or the second rear tire I've had to replace since I bought this machine.[I'm averaging a little over 16,500 miles to a rear tire] It still has 2/32 of tread in the center of it,which is the minumium tread depth allowed before you can get your inspection sticker,but why wait cause the nice weather is upon us and I wanna be out riding it,not working on it.And what I also noticed when I put it up on the lift was,the belt was running DEAD CENTER in the rear cog,meaning,I MUST HAVE DONE SOMETHING RIGHT,for a change! Amazing,isn't it??? :oops: :eek:
 

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Tomorrow I will be replacing the rear tire again at the 33,000 mile mark.This will be number three,or the second rear tire I've had to replace since I bought this machine.[I'm averaging a little over 16,500 miles to a rear tire] It still has 2/32 of tread in the center of it,which is the minumium tread depth allowed before you can get your inspection sticker,but why wait cause the nice weather is upon us and I wanna be out riding it,not working on it.And what I also noticed when I put it up on the lift was,the belt was running DEAD CENTER in the rear cog,meaning,I MUST HAVE DONE SOMETHING RIGHT,for a change! Amazing,isn't it??? :oops: :eek:
You just had to say it out loud, didn't you? Now it will never happen again. LOL
I can't get mine dead center, but when I stop it is now actually a little off the left side. After about 5 or 6 adjustments, I'm calling that done.
 

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If you have a shop manual,[I do] it explains how to adjust the tension and alignment.And it made the procedure QUITE SIMPLE to do,not to mention, quite ACCURATE!! If I remember correctly,you set the tension first using the right adjuster. Then using the left adjuster,ya set the alignment,then torque the axle nut to spec.I've only done it once ,and that was when I changed that tire at the 15,000 mile mark which is about a year ago,and that belt has run dead center ever since which is over the last 18,000 miles.But I'll check my book again once I get the new tire mounted on the wheel,and back on the scooter.Then I'll report back as to what and how I did it!! Fair enough??? Dave!!!
 

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If you have a shop manual,[I do] it explains how to adjust the tension and alignment.And it made the procedure QUITE SIMPLE to do,not to mention, quite ACCURATE!! If I remember correctly,you set the tension first using the right adjuster. Then using the left adjuster,ya set the alignment,then torque the axle nut to spec.I've only done it once ,and that was when I changed that tire at the 15,000 mile mark which is about a year ago,and that belt has run dead center ever since which is over the last 18,000 miles.But I'll check my book again once I get the new tire mounted on the wheel,and back on the scooter.Then I'll report back as to what and how I did it!! Fair enough??? Dave!!!
I have the shop manual. You have your left & right reversed, but the process iscorrect.
 

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I made an attempt to change my rear tire today,but everyone was stopping by buggin me to fix this or look at that,and I'm trying to do my own stuff,and then,I forget where I'm at and have to start all over again.I was working on my scooter this afternoon changing the tire.One of my neighbiors stopped by and asked me if i could do a job on his tractor,which i agreed to,but,after he left,I forgot the most important part of the job I was doing and that was balancing my tire BEFORE I put it on the bike.Well that went all to hell as I had to pull the wheel tire asembly back off the bike,then balance it,then put it back on.I was taking notes so I could get back to you,but that went to hell in a hurry.But,tomoorw is another day and HOPEFULLY no one will bother me and I can finish my job,then get back to you on my alignment procedure.I mean DUH!!!! lol lol Frustrated Dave!!!
 

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I have the shop manual. You have your left & right reversed, but the process iscorrect.
Actually, I believe Dave is correct.
Taken from the Indian Manual sections 2.31 & 2.32

1. Place the motorcycle in an upright position with the front wheel clamped in a wheel vise. 2. Make note of adjuster locations q and w. 3. Raise the rear of the motorcycle so the rear tire can be freely rotated. 4. Loosen axle nut e and re-tighten to the ADJUSTMENT SPECIFICATION during the adjustment procedure. 5. Turn the RIGHT SIDE adjuster nut r to achieve proper belt tension. See Drive Belt Tension Measurement, page 2.29. 6. When belt tension is correct, check and adjust final wheel alignment as follows: Belt Alignment A drive belt that is not properly aligned can cause drive line noise and damage the drive belt, causing possible belt failure and loss of control of the motorcycle.
**NOTE To minimize change in belt tension, use LEFT SIDE adjuster only to make final adjustments to belt alignment. (my highlight/underline)
7. Rotate the wheel BACKWARD. Tighten LEFT SIDE adjuster until belt comes off inside sprocket flange during backward wheel rotation. IMPORTANT The belt should track to the center of the sprocket tooth surface when properly aligned . Sprocket teeth should be visible on both sides of the drive belt.
8. Rotate the wheel in the FORWARD direction and verify that sprocket teeth are still visible on both sides of the drive belt.
9. If necessary, loosen the axle nut and LEFT SIDE adjuster until belt just moves off the right flange and begins to track down the center of the driven sprocket flange during forward wheel rotation. NOTE It may be necessary to loosen the axle nut and tap the left end of the axle to ensure it moves forward when the adjuster is loosened. The axle nut must be re-tighten to the ADJUSTMENT SPECIFICATION before proceeding.
 

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Exactly right!! And that's what I was doing before one of my neighbors stopped by which is when I forgot to balance it BEFORE I put it back on.So I had to pull the assembly back off, balance it,then put it back on,but was getting frustrated with the alignment procedure which I've done twice now with good success. [ this is my second rear tire change on this bike] But tomorrow is another day!! Dave!!!
 

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Actually, I believe Dave is correct.
Taken from the Indian Manual sections 2.31 & 2.32

1. Place the motorcycle in an upright position with the front wheel clamped in a wheel vise. 2. Make note of adjuster locations q and w. 3. Raise the rear of the motorcycle so the rear tire can be freely rotated. 4. Loosen axle nut e and re-tighten to the ADJUSTMENT SPECIFICATION during the adjustment procedure. 5. Turn the RIGHT SIDE adjuster nut r to achieve proper belt tension. See Drive Belt Tension Measurement, page 2.29. 6. When belt tension is correct, check and adjust final wheel alignment as follows: Belt Alignment A drive belt that is not properly aligned can cause drive line noise and damage the drive belt, causing possible belt failure and loss of control of the motorcycle.
**NOTE To minimize change in belt tension, use LEFT SIDE adjuster only to make final adjustments to belt alignment. (my highlight/underline)
7. Rotate the wheel BACKWARD. Tighten LEFT SIDE adjuster until belt comes off inside sprocket flange during backward wheel rotation. IMPORTANT The belt should track to the center of the sprocket tooth surface when properly aligned . Sprocket teeth should be visible on both sides of the drive belt.
8. Rotate the wheel in the FORWARD direction and verify that sprocket teeth are still visible on both sides of the drive belt.
9. If necessary, loosen the axle nut and LEFT SIDE adjuster until belt just moves off the right flange and begins to track down the center of the driven sprocket flange during forward wheel rotation. NOTE It may be necessary to loosen the axle nut and tap the left end of the axle to ensure it moves forward when the adjuster is loosened. The axle nut must be re-tighten to the ADJUSTMENT SPECIFICATION before proceeding.
I am talking about the Scout. Are you referring to a different model with the belt on the right? I have the Scout manual and it clearly refers to left tension and right tracking/alignment. See attached screen caps from the 2015-2017 Scout & Scout 60 manual.
belt tension.jpg


belt alignment.jpg
 

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Properties of Kevlar intrigue me so I found the DuPont technical guide for Kevlar.

From page 13:
Kevlar® has a very small, negative coefficient of thermal expansion
(CTE) in the longitudinal direction. The value of the CTE of
Kevlar® is dependent on measuring technique, sample preparation
and test method

WOW - way more info that this old guy can absorb, but thx ? I think
I still like the old fashion Chain = 1) Triumph, 1) BSA 441, 4) Honda, 1) Suzuki, 6) HD, 1) BMW, 1) Kawasaki and now Chieftain Dark Horse - Loved them all.
"Keep yur Knees n the Breeze"
 

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My previous bike,a 2010 Triumph Thunderbird, also used belt drive as a lot of models being built these days are now doing,and was the first belt driven bike I had ever owned.And because it used the belt drive,it was a learning experience ,believe me,lol, but I did "FINALLY" break the code [after a lot of trial and error,and pullin out what little hair I had left,lol,lol] but can now use that knowledge on this machne as well as any other machines that I may encounter with belt drive.And I believe the reasons the manufacturers went to the belt drive ,especially on the larger machines is #1, they run quieter, #2,they don't make the mess on the rear wheel like the chain drives do,and #3,it's cheaper to build.So,like everybody else,I'm learning too!! Dave!!!
 

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Well gang,I'm happy to report that my rear tire R+R is 98% complete.The other 2% won't come til after I road test it,which I can't do right now cause it's frigin RAININ, "AGAIN".DUH!!! But just a couple of points:The SM tells ya to set the belts tension at 1.3 inches of up and down movement at it's tightest point,cold belt.I set mine at 1.5 inches because after going thru hell with that Triumph I had,which the SM stated to set it at .5 inches of up and down movement at it's tightest point,cold belt,was waaaaaaaaaay too tight,as I soon discovered.And in some cases that tension destroyed rear wheel bearings,and in a couple cases,actually took out the front crank bearing,not to mention the belt chirped so bad that you could actually hear the bike coming down the road,even over loud pipes. [so it was pretty bad]
So shortly after buying that machine,and thru trial and error,I also changed that adjustment to 1.5 inches of up and down movement at the belts tightest point [cold belt] and it worked,then passed that info along to the techs at the Triumph dealership where I bought it from so they too could follow my lead when working on customers machines.
Regarding alignment: I use the SM,only as a guide.Then go from experience and experimentation which is how we learn.On the Triumph,I had to use a laser to set the alignment,which HD also uses [or are supposed to use] when changing tires or doing a belt alignment on their machines.So far on this machine,I haven't had to do that cause the SM gives ya a pretty good description of how to do it.
Anyways, after completing the job this morning,then spinning the wheel in a forward rotation to check tension and alignment,I noticed that the belt was "AGAIN" running "DEAD CENTER" on the rear cog,just like it was before.So I believe that I now have this machine figured out too,just like I did with that Triumph I had.!!
Not bad for a DUMB POLOCK,whadaya think??? :rolleyes: :)
 

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I am talking about the Scout. Are you referring to a different model with the belt on the right? I have the Scout manual and it clearly refers to left tension and right tracking/alignment. See attached screen caps from the 2015-2017 Scout & Scout 60 manual.
View attachment 584136

View attachment 584137
Looks like we're all correct, but on different bikes. The 111/116 bikes have the drive belt on the right side, which I have & referred to. The Scouts have the drive belt on the left. Hence the opposite tension nut/adjustment nut procedure. Good to know.
 

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I am talking about the Scout. Are you referring to a different model with the belt on the right? I have the Scout manual and it clearly refers to left tension and right tracking/alignment. See attached screen caps from the 2015-2017 Scout & Scout 60 manual.
View attachment 584136

View attachment 584137
At work, we refer to our machinery as the side with the controls as the "Home" side. The opposite side is refered to the "Away" side. That way when you are working on or under the machinery it's easier to give someone instructions instead of specific directions instead of right, left, north, south, etc. I do the same thing when adjusting belt tension. The belt side I refer to as the "Home" side. The brake disc side I refer to as the "Away" side. Adjust the belt tension first using the "Home" side adjuster. Once the tension is set, you should not need to adjust the "Home" side again unless the tension becomes out of spec. Then adjust the belt alignment with the "Away" side adjuster. This way it's referenced same way on all bikes irregardless of which side the drive belt is on.

I just remember to always adjust "Home" side first, "Away" side second.
 
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