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Discussion Starter #1
I don't remember seeing anything about the engine cooling ability of the Scout. Did anyone notice how well the bike cooled sitting still? I thought I saw a comment on the engine getting hot on a warm day. On my demo ride a guy felt the engine when we returned and he said the side of the engine was not hot to the touch.
 

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It's the exhaust heat shields which get hot. That's the complaint. Where ordinary heat shields are thing sheet metal often perforated, these are thick heavy things that act like heat sinks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It seems every time I ride a V-Rod I get the right leg.
 

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The Time sat on and Started it .. The Pipes were hotter than a 2 dollar pistol, but how they are actually moving at a good clip don't know ..
 

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I don't remember seeing anything about the engine cooling ability of the Scout. Did anyone notice how well the bike cooled sitting still? I thought I saw a comment on the engine getting hot on a warm day. On my demo ride a guy felt the engine when we returned and he said the side of the engine was not hot to the touch.

These bikes have those thermal controlled electric fans on the radiator.
That the engine, itself isn't too hot to the touch tells me the radiator is plenty big and efficient.

The exhaust can be remedied by means of layered shields that can also be visually pleasing to the eye while doing it's job.
I read somewhere that they were working on that issue. Didn't confirm it though.

These demos ARE pre-production and likely, some of the bikes that they used for testing.

Your mileage may vary.
 

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Exhaust thermal wraps
 

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Exhaust thermal wraps
For those who are not into chrome that would would but for those that are, well..... into chrome bandages might not work.
Anyone who can see them in person, should take a look at Triumph's Scrambler (stock) and give thought to it being applied to the Scout.

HOWEVER...... Thermal wraps with a leather wrap outer, might be interesting.
1) you wrap the thermal strip.
2) You wrap and lace the leather. The leather could applied at those points where it is an issue.
3) for tribal accentuation, (velcro- type attach/removable fastening) Buffalo Hair-on-hide outer-wrap. About 10-12" long. specifically where the shielding is needed most.

Result, a combo Chrome/ with a spot of Leather hair on hide Buffalo Robe over thermal wrap serving as the heat shield.


Doesn't have to be Buffalo Robe, any thick hide should do.

Remember foundrymen, blacksmiths would wear leather protection aprons and etc when working the forge or handling the ladle.
If leather doable there, it may be doable on the exhaust.

Just a thought.
 

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I've heard of guys taking the heat shields off, and spraying the back side of them with Cerakote, a ceramic used on firearms, and putting them back on. I haven't tried it myself. Cerakote is fairly cheap, and comes in a ton of colors (black or silver might be best to camouflage it). It also comes in a few different thermal ratings -- the tougher one being for use on the barrels of firearms.
 

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I did notice that even though the exhaust shield was hot the Coolant Temp was around 190 on the readout ..
 

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I did notice that even though the exhaust shield was hot the Coolant Temp was around 190 on the readout ..
That's normal. Exhaust will always be hotter than water temp.
When I drove big rigs, I would occasionally drive CAT powered trucks that were equipped with an ISSPRO pyrometer like this one.
R602__88712.1405432898.1280.1280.jpg

I've seen exhaust temps climb as high as 900-1000 deg. Obviously water temps never get that high, 212 deg. being boiling temp.
The difference between a CAT and Cummins was that you could lug the CAT down to 1300-1400 rpms but the Cummins needed to
run on the high side, usually being happy above 1800 rpms. The old v series Detroits were similar to the Cummins. Though they
could be nasty leakers, the blowers had a whine that made you smile. Along with the MACK Thermodynes, they were all good engines.
The CAT was my favorite though. The Pyrometer was invaluable in that not only was it useful on the grades but also down any highway.
If the temp started to climb on a flat stretch, there was the possibility that a blow-out occurred on a inner dual or air pressure was low.
These would be suspect when transmission and axle oil temp gauges started to climb above normal op temps.
Sorry to slip a little OT but the road is the road and memory lane is what it is.

On a bike, a pair of those pyrometers would be useful for monitoring the EGs of both cylinders. IF there were unequal temp readings, you
might guess that something's not quite right with one of the cylinders (v2) even though the engine may sound normal.
 

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That's normal. Exhaust will always be hotter than water temp.
When I drove big rigs, I would occasionally drive CAT powered trucks that were equipped with an ISSPRO pyrometer like this one.
View attachment 2984

I've seen exhaust temps climb as high as 900-1000 deg. Obviously water temps never get that high, 212 deg. being boiling temp.
The difference between a CAT and Cummins was that you could lug the CAT down to 1300-1400 rpms but the Cummins needed to
run on the high side, usually being happy above 1800 rpms. The old v series Detroits were similar to the Cummins. Though they
could be nasty leakers, the blowers had a whine that made you smile. Along with the MACK Thermodynes, they were all good engines.
The CAT was my favorite though. The Pyrometer was invaluable in that not only was it useful on the grades but also down any highway.
If the temp started to climb on a flat stretch, there was the possibility that a blow-out occurred on a inner dual or air pressure was low.
These would be suspect when transmission and axle oil temp gauges started to climb above normal op temps.
Sorry to slip a little OT but the road is the road and memory lane is what it is.

On a bike, a pair of those pyrometers would be useful for monitoring the EGs of both cylinders. IF there were unequal temp readings, you
might guess that something's not quite right with one of the cylinders (v2) even though the engine may sound normal.
While slipping a little off topic being a Marine Engineer for a lot of years before retiring .. The Exhaust Pyro's could be a lifesaver to monitor your Engine .. But didn't have my legs sitting close to the exhaust either ..
 
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