Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On the advice of a friend who was once an Indian Service Manager I took my 2015 Scout in for a coolant change as the coolant in it was the original from 2015 (or 5 years, as per the book). He also told me the service can be a royal pain in the butt. The bike has always cruised at 174 and never got over 208 at any time. Since the coolant service I now run a steady 186, and at lights it got up to 231. Question is; Will this condition improve with use, or do I need to return the bike for more use of the "special tool"? Did it getting that hot screw anything up? Thanks for any responses.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
5,087 Posts
The Scout fan turns on and off at certain temperatures, so it's a surprise to hear it's changed. I forget what those points are as I no longer have a Scout so haven't kept up with the technical stuff so much, and here in Oz we use metric so the numbers won't match. For a bike tuned with a PVCX, FuelMoto will often lower the turn on temp by about 5 degrees.

Bleeding air from the Scout coolant can be a problem sometimes. Apparently there's a high point in one hose that can trap a bubble. That might have something to do with the elevated temps.

The bike should be OK with those numbers, but the coolant itself might suffer. Stronger coolant concentrations allow higher temps but if a low concentrate coolant is consistently too hot it can start to boil. If you are riding in a hot climate this might be relevant.

A conversation with your ex-service manager friend should give you more info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your response. I am riding in Central Florida so yes, it sure does get hot here and I doubt that helps. Is it possible that the air will eventually equalize or "self-purge" as some claim, or do I need to return it to the stealership for more attempts? Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
I'd be going back. Mine cruises about the same temp and if that went up I would be concerned.One of the main reasons I bought my Scout was the liquid,fan assisted cooling.I never ride my HD in the warmer weather.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
5,087 Posts
This is the relevant info from the Scout service manual. You'll find a link somewhere on the forum if you want to download it.

The coolant should be 50/50 mix - that is the most common mix and is usually rated to 225 F. Higher concentrations don't provide any better cooling but they can take higher temps before reaching their limit, such as might be needed in a race motor.

The system is pressurized so that even if the coolant reaches boiling point it won't bubble and vaporize - until you remove the radiator cap. (Don't!) If the pressure gets too high it forces the coolant into the overflow tank. As the motor cools down it sucks it back into the system.

There is a thermostat in the system that opens at 180 F and allows the coolant to flow. Below that there is almost no flow so the motor can warm up to operating temps.

The fan turns on at 204.8 F and off at 203 F. Only 2 degrees difference, so the fan isn't spinning for long. If you are sitting in traffic at lights you'll notice the fan come on but out on the road you might never hear it.
There might be slight variations on the display between bikes as temp gauges are not all perfectly matched.

All this means the system is designed to run close to the temps you are seeing without harm. However, because you've noticed the difference with the change of coolant, it's worth chasing up with somebody on the actual bike.

600889
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you, Dr. Shifty for a most informative response. I doubt anything untoward happened with my bike, but it did change with the coolant refresh so, as you say, I intend to take it back to the stealership and have them do the job I already paid them to do. People, like machines, are not perfect. Thanks again.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top