Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here is something I am have a problem. Think maybe the bike is a lemon. This is my wife's bike ,2017 Vintage with a Hannigan sidecar mounted. She has 23 years & over 300K miles on her own bikes.
At 4260 miles the stator went out. dealer went out and got the wife with his trailer. Quickly replaced it
.
At 5200 miles the bike gave no warning , loss of power. In a bad area for phones. Very bad back road , no place to pull over She rode my Springfield home . I got to a place where I could call a wrecker. Was a cooked clutch. Wrencher said not under warranty. Figured it may have been related to mods with sidecar. ( Triple tree& Handlebars)
6842 miles on I-40 construction area. Concrete walls both sides. Repeat of first clutch. This time had a couple of crescents, and was able do a emergency adjustment ( Thank God for hazard lights.) Got it home after one more stop and a better adjustment. Took to the dealer today. BTW that is 1642 miles on that clutch. I also checked the adjustment on both bikes before leaving on our trip.
I believe there is a defect in the clutch area. wrencher thinks it is the way wife is driving it.
Now that I have all of story in >>My question is this has anyone had a similar problem. My Springfield has 8900 mils and not had a need for a adjustment.
Thanks
 

·
Vendor / bronze
Joined
·
2,775 Posts
I read this forum a lot and I don't see many clutch problems mentioned. It seems likely to be related to the sidecar. Possibly a combination of extra weight and the installation created a problem (if that is possible). The adjustment of the cable and shifting rod is a little sensitive. There is a fairly narrow range that it works properly. So maybe the adjustment is also part of the problem. Alright if I go on any more, I am faking it too much. Hope you figure it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
All I can say is that I have almost 110,000 miles, several thousand of those towing a camping trailer with the bike, and am still running the original clutch. Let me also add that I pulled it out a few thousand miles ago and inspected it. Everything looks almost new still, and all of the friction disks still have a lot of life left per measurements. We also have several other members on this forum with more miles than I that are still on the original clutches.

That said, it would appear that the design is proven good. One failure I could understand attributing to defective parts, but multiple failures would indicate to me that something else is happening. Either your wife is slipping the clutch excessively due to the added weight of the sidecar, or the adjustment isn't being done right, possibly both. Not trying to be insulting at all, just pointing out the reality of things. ;)
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
Adjustment of the clutch cable is critical on the 111. Mine from the dealer was not set properly. There should be about a millimeter of clearance at the end of the clutch lever end before you get moved of the clutch. The manual shows this. Any preload will cause slippage in high gear with a fair amount of throttle. Adding a side car will agrivate the issue. Dean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,379 Posts
40000 hard miles on original clutch. I don’t see or feel any issues. I assume you are running Stock oil.. must be adjustment in conjunction with sidecar.
 

·
Silver member
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
It's something with your sidecar kit or your wife's riding style....
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,387 Posts
These machines come with synthetic oil which is very slippery compared to regular oil.So with that said,it's "possible" that the bike,side car combination, is ,infact,over heating and over taxing that oil,creating more clutch slippage when starting off and pulling it down the highway,hence prematurely wearing the clutch out.Pulling a trailer is a little different from attaching a side car cause it puts less stress on the clutch.There must be others out there who also have a side car attached to their Indians.If you could make contact with those people,you could ask and compare notes.Or,you could try using regular oil to see if that makes any difference.At any rate,I wish you luck in your endeavor!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Adjustment of the clutch cable is critical on the 111. Mine from the dealer was not set properly. There should be about a millimeter of clearance at the end of the clutch lever end before you get moved of the clutch. The manual shows this. Any preload will cause slippage in high gear with a fair amount of throttle. Adding a side car will agrivate the issue. Dean
I agree, I make sure the handle has a little play or wiggle in it at rest.
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
2,913 Posts
These machines come with synthetic oil which is very slippery compared to regular oil.So with that said,it's "possible" that the bike,side car combination, is ,infact,over heating and over taxing that oil,creating more clutch slippage when starting off and pulling it down the highway,hence prematurely wearing the clutch out.Pulling a trailer is a little different from attaching a side car cause it puts less stress on the clutch.There must be others out there who also have a side car attached to their Indians.If you could make contact with those people,you could ask and compare notes.Or,you could try using regular oil to see if that makes any difference.At any rate,I wish you luck in your endeavor!
The Indian oil is a semi synthetic oil. This is what was in my bike when I had my clutch slippage issues due to the mis-adjusted clutch cable. I have since switched to full synthetic oils and never seen any more issues since the clutch was properly adjusted. Motorcycle synthetic oils are no more "slippery" that conventional motorcycle oils. The issue that comes up is when energy saving automotive oils are used (like 0w20, 5w30, and 10w30 multigrade oils). These oils contain friction modifiers that will effect the operation of the clutch and should never be used on the 111 or any wet clutch application. I am not wanting to turn this into another oil thread but I would not recommend switching to a conventional oil as a possible solution to this problem. Dean

Another possibility would be the alignment of the side car to the bike. I would look at the sidecar tire and the back tire for any unusual wear patterns. A toe in or toe out misalignment would definitely put added strain on the clutch and powertrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
These machines come with synthetic oil which is very slippery compared to regular oil.So with that said,it's "possible" that the bike,side car combination, is ,infact,over heating and over taxing that oil,creating more clutch slippage when starting off and pulling it down the highway,hence prematurely wearing the clutch out.Pulling a trailer is a little different from attaching a side car cause it puts less stress on the clutch.There must be others out there who also have a side car attached to their Indians.If you could make contact with those people,you could ask and compare notes.Or,you could try using regular oil to see if that makes any difference.At any rate,I wish you luck in your endeavor!
One assertion here is not true, the other illogical.

The bikes do not come with synthetic, but with semi-synthetic. Assuming he is using oil spec'd for motorcycles, there is not an issue with excess "slipperiness."
How is a trailer and different than a sidecar? Weight is weight. Perhaps the sidecar is not in alignment and causing a drag, which is still a form of weight or load on the engine.
Moving back to conventional oil would be a bad idea; conventional oils are LESS tolerant of heat and can more easily shear in a shared sump system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
One assertion here is not true, the other illogical.

The bikes do not come with synthetic, but with semi-synthetic. Assuming he is using oil spec'd for motorcycles, there is not an issue with excess "slipperiness."
How is a trailer and different than a sidecar? Weight is weight. Perhaps the sidecar is not in alignment and causing a drag, which is still a form of weight or load on the engine.
Moving back to conventional oil would be a bad idea; conventional oils are LESS tolerant of heat and can more easily shear in a shared sump system.
The sidecar is aligned properly. Tracks true going down the road. I agree on your oil statement. I prefer AMS oil especially in out Oklahoma heat. It will keep the engine cooler.
It appears that we had a bad / weak clutch spring.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
995 Posts
I took my Roadmaster in for a service. They adjusted the clutch cable. On my 300 mile ride back home, cracked the throttle to pass a vehicle, "what the heck", the clutch is slipping. I babied it home and slacken off the clutch cable. That was 30,000 kms ago....and no problems since. I pull a Leesure Lite trailer on occasions. which is about 400 lbs, and ride mostly 2 up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the reply's. First of all I called Hannigan. The Tech people have not heard of and such problems. Mean time the dealer and I came up with similar ideas. We are going to replace the clutch and install the heavier springs. Just to be sure he is going to have a machine test them to see if they are in specs. ( BTW he volunteered that it would be done at no cost to me. ). From the replies I have received on theses two Forums I came up with weak/defective spring(s). You folks helped me eliminate a number of possibilities that I was looking at.
Because of the heat in our area I am thinking about installing a oilier cooler. I have used them on other bikes when I lived in West Texas, and they did a lot of good.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,387 Posts
I agree with everything you just said.However,some of my encounters with these and or similar problems, have led me else wheres,hence the reason I posted about it.But a side car does put more stress on the running gear then just a regular bike trailer,that is,unless it's a BIG trailer ,like the ones you see being pulled behind cars and small pick ups.But don't laugh, cause I've actually seen guys pulling these behind two wheelers, :"loaded", and then ,they can't figure out WHY something has gone wrong with the bike's running gear!! I mean,DUH!!!!!!!!!! lol lol
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top