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You are very lucky. Several years ago a few of my mates were over from Australia doing the Route 66 ride on hired Harleys and the exact same thing happened, sadly the lead rider died at the scene, the next were a couple, the rider suffered brain damage from which he is still recovering, his wife had minor injuries and the rest were able to avoid the carnage. The driver of the pickup was never charged by police.
I finely noticed one of your threads on here Lee!! Just never saw the connection until you mentioned it on the Triumph site the other day.But now,I'm gonna have to warn everybody on here about you!! :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: Your buddy ,Dave!!!
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
Unfortunately there is nothing you can do but be aware and drive safely yourself. Not long ago I had a guy at an intersection (he had a stop sign I did not) he looked dead at me then slowly pull out into my lane to make a left into a long line of stopped traffic that he could not merge into, so his car is in my lane. I just went around him and kept going. Fortunately I saw exactly what he was going to do, so I had time to react.
Same here. Approacing an intersection and the guy looked me rigt in the eye and pulled out. Almost put the bike down. Another time a guy driving a 18 wheeler looked me in the eye and crossed the lane.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
I have had those. A guy pulled out of a feed and grain store, right in front of me, with a trailer loaded with hay. That was on my Scout and I installed a really bright LED headlight after that close call.
Two days ago, a mail truck, delivering mail on a country road, pulled right out to drive to the next house. Living in the CA foothills, we have great roads, but you have to be alert. Always expect the idiot will pull out in front of you. I think I fear deer more that anything.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
People have lost the awareness that their first responsibility while operating two tons of machinery is to operate the machinery not to talk to anyone, text anyone, check their calendar, order food for pick-up, or anything else. Cell phones in the hands of the irresponsible have been wreaking havoc for decades now and it's not going to end. Hands free is only slightly better because it's not necessarily where your hands are but where your head is that counts. I try to watch every situation and figure out how this or that cager can kill me, and come up with an escape plan.
 

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And what ever happened to the "I screwed up wave". One of the first things mom taught me (yes mommy taught me to drive in 1976 lol) was if you make a mistake, to roll down your window and give a little wave acknowledging your mistake. I do that to this day, it generally takes away all the road rage from the person you inadvertently cut off.
 

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About two weeks ago my riding buddy for many years died on his motorcycle a brand new FTR1200. He was a very experienced rider having raced in many motorcycle races in Baja. He didn't even have the bike for more than 24 hours. He was 67 years old and I simply could not keep up with him in the turns but he would always wait for me. He is sorely missed. He collided with another motorcyclist (22 years old). My guess is that the 22 year old did not have much experience and made the mistake. He is in grave condition. I won't know the particulars until the accident report is finished. I had tried to call him to ask him how he was getting on with the bike and the calls went to automatic voicemail. So, I figured something was up. I finally got a hold of his wife she told me the bad news. I miss you Jeff!
 

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Over time you will learn to “sense” what other drivers are going to do. When i see a car hugging the right side of the lane, i sense he’s going to eventually change lanes, be ready for it. Learn to trust that instinct and prepare yourself. That preparation will give you the precious seconds needed to avoid an accident. Nine times out of ten it won’t be needed but that one time will be worth it!
 

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Another unfortunate thing is the exponential rise in road rage. Just a few days ago not far from where I live road rage initiated by a pregnant woman against a motorcycle rider ended up with her being shot and killed. How sad is that?
 

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About two weeks ago my riding buddy for many years died on his motorcycle a brand new FTR1200. He was a very experienced rider having raced in many motorcycle races in Baja. He didn't even have the bike for more than 24 hours. He was 67 years old and I simply could not keep up with him in the turns but he would always wait for me. He is sorely missed. He collided with another motorcyclist (22 years old). My guess is that the 22 year old did not have much experience and made the mistake. He is in grave condition. I won't know the particulars until the accident report is finished. I had tried to call him to ask him how he was getting on with the bike and the calls went to automatic voicemail. So, I figured something was up. I finally got a hold of his wife she told me the bad news. I miss you Jeff!
Sorry for your loss ... :(
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
My bride decided she wanted to ride her own Indian motorcycle. So I told her "the people coming at you don't see you and the people coming from behind could care less about you. So ride like your in a fast and furious video game."
 

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When I went to my local dealer for a test ride on an FTR the guy ran through all the stuff and then started on the touch screen and how you could switch from this to that whilst riding, I told him I would pull over before I did anything like that, unfortunately most people don't. Always look to see where drivers are looking, if its at their lap they're on their phone, not that they need a phone to make their driving worse. One time I was touring with a mate in south west France, we were in the sticks when suddenly a car came flying into our path, later my mate commented and I replied what d'you expect from a guy with only one hub cap! I hadn't realised I'd processed a great deal and used all the clues I could garner, no hubcaps, didn't care about his car and probably anyone else he hit stuff a lot ! Always be switched on and always be looking at everything! Ride safe
 

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Experience is a great teacher and has taught me to ALWAYS be AWARE of my surroundings,ESPECIALLY when mounted on a two wheeler.And that's whether I'm in traffic or alone on some back road.But I've been pretty lucky over my 60 some odd years mounted on two wheels cause I've only been hit twice and both times were with minor injury to me and the bike I was riding.But what really bothers me the most about these incidents is "MAKIN THE WIFE HAPPY" !!! :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
 

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Iv always been told it's not if but when you go down. No way to really rationalize it. If it really bothers you you might consider not riding. Not trying to be negative but the last thing you want to do is panic. I went down on the highway years back and I was on another bike within days no negative thoughts about it.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
I get it, I really do. The sad part is, the same thing happens often in front of me while driving an an 18 wheeler too. Whether it's a phone or just their own misperception of speed, it happens. To most drivers, other vehicles of any kind are nothing to them except an obstacle, if they notice at all. I'm glad that humble is one of the states of being you took away from it. Saddle up and get past being shaken but understand this kind of thing is why so many motorcycle safety instructors recommend that you practice hard maneuvers in parking lots, even after you are a more comfortable rider.
Be safe and choose not to be one of those careless cagers when you're driving your 4 wheeler. Try to encourage others not to as well.
 
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