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To keep it shortish lol
Driver in intersection waiting to turn left in south bound lane. Im heading towards him in northbound lane. Doing about 30 km an hour. Truck on my side waiting to left. Other guy begins to turn left in front of me then stops right in the middle of my lane. I couldn’t see him til just before entering the intersection when he made that move. Riding a 2015 Scout, slam brakes, bike slides out, I slide on pavement dislocate finger, scrape elbow and knee. Stop just against the front bumper, small tap of my helmet. Realize that I should have slowed sooner and would have stopped with ABS I figure. Bikes a write off, waiting for insurance payment to look for a new Chief as that accident was not my fault. 100% his for stopping in my lane.
 

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Happens to all of us, just thank whatever god you care to that you're ok and move on.

Learned a lot of interesting stuff from 30+ years of firearms training that applies, among those ...

Always maintain your situational awareness. As many have said already, everyone out there is trying to kill you, so watch everything, all the time. Which leads to ...

Know what to look for. Bad guys will almost always display what we call "pre-attack indicators", e.g. giving you the hard stare, squaring up or blading, clenching their fists, hunching their shoulders, patting their waistband, etc. Drivers do it too. If you see someone slowing then accelerating, slowing then accelerating again, etc., their head is pivoting all over the place, etc., they are practically screaming at you "I'm about to make a turn, but I'm not sure where". Weaving in their lane, uneven speed, abrupt movements, etc. = drunk, stoned, or neck deep in their phone. Etc., ad infinitum.

As many have also said, take a class, watch videos, read books, etc. Been riding 42 years and I'm still learning new stuff all the time. Never too old or too smart to learn something new.

Keep the shiny side up ... :)
 

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Numerous close calls and one pretty bad accident plus a few minor ones since I started riding my own motorcycles in 1970. The odds are you will have all of the above. Some are lucky and some are not but being ultra defensive helps your odds quite a bit.
 

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I 've been mounted on two wheels now for close to 66 consecutuve years and lost count of how many times a four wheeler has dam near killed me over those years.It got to the point that I actually became an Inspector for the State Police,the DOT,and the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles so I could educate those guys [since most of em did not ride two wheeler] how and what to look for,and go after these people.But it isn't because the drivers in the four wheeler don't like two wheelers,it's because they simply aren't paying attention.And then,ya got those people who simply don't give a shit,thinking they own the road,which they don't!! And then,to add even more insult to injury, we discovered that too many of these people do NOT even have a drivers' license and [you'll probably find this hard to believe] are not even citizens and are ILLEGAL in this country,not to mention,,driving a stolen vehicle,claiming they didn't know it was stolen.Ya RIGHT!!!! And the really bad news is: YA CAN'T CATCH EM ALL!!

So the only thing we can do as motorcycle operators is try to pay closer attention when on the road so WE do NOT become another STATISTIC too.Follow me??? Dave!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Folks:

As the OP for this thread I want to thank all of you; I didn't expect the level of thought that appeared in the follow-up posts. It's really cool to hear from riders with decades of experience, and I can and have learned a lot from your wisdom.

The replies were a combination of sound advice about defensive riding; philosophical musings about the therapeutic effect of motorcycling; reflections on mortality and whether we want to go through life in a sheltered, scared manner versus doing what we love while trying to minimizing risk and while acknowledging our higher power's ultimate role in our fate; and a healthy level of tough love (effectively, "come on, man, you know this is a risky hobby. Whaddya expect? Cowboy up and get back out!")

Like most/all of you, I need to ride. I haven't found anything else that can put me in the same frame of mind so well. Happy Thanksgiving and ride safely.

Mike
 

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Ride like every car on the road is driven by a trained assassin and you are the target.

Close calls happen, but paying attention and riding defensively can often be the difference between a close call and disaster. I sitll get annoyed when it happens, but I tend to forget about it in a few minutes time. I can't control other people.
 

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Congratulations you passed the first lesson. Continue to calculate all the variables that a driver without a attention span can do. It’s a 360 degree riding visual field you have to adopt.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
When I ride, I hope the best and prepare for the worst. At every intersection and with each oncoming vehicle, I anticipate a vehicle cutting in front of me...I slow, drop a gear and cover the brake. Some will say that will ruin a good ride. I am still here to pass this along. Ride safe...HAPPY THANKSGIVING
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
Glad your riding skills avoided a collision. Enjoyed your details. I began riding early 70’s. Fortunately attended multiple motorcycle & vehicle safety courses, a German brand performance driving school & local community college Commercial drivers course. Since mobile phones are now in everyones hands the required focus while driving seems less of a priority. Daily I look down from my work truck at texters & callers passing me above the speed limit. My truck & trailer weight is 80’000 pounds, so I must drive extra cautious. I have seen people die at work & on the road. It gives you a perspective that never leaves you. I believe one solution to distracted drivers is to present in any Driver education course the graphic pictures details and video of horrific collisions. I was exposed to vivid safety training early in life and have been a safer rider/driver because of it. I wore all black motorcycle gear, leather jacket, denim pants & helmet. Not anymore. I have bright safety yellow bands on my jacket. Headlight & riding lights on & ride my Dark horse as cautious as my work truck. Then hope my training will allow me out brake or accelerate away from any potential collision.
 

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You can wear he brightest colors in the world with HUGE flashing lights all over em,but if the operator of the other vehicle is NOT paying attention[ I know,perish the thought,lol] you're dead meat and that's just the way it is,and I've seen this a number of times over the years.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
I always assume that every other vehicle on the road wants to kill me…..helps me keep hyperalert.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
Similar incident happened to me but I slammed into the car and broke my leg with multiple fractures. I eventually got a new bike and that crash made me more observant of cars turning across the lane and thinking about what to do if it does happen again.
 

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This may sound kind of ignorant and I apologize in advance because it is not meant that way. If that is how you feel after one close call, you probably shouldn't be riding. It's going to happen time and time again. By nature, what we do is more dangerous then some other modes of transportation. Hell, I have close calls in my car all the time too, I don't consider not driving! I don't even give close calls a second thought. You can't. I've been riding for over 40 years, you will have many close calls and you will learn from each one of them. First thing you need to learn, is to expect the unexpected. If there is a car coming at you and there is a place to turn, assume they are going to turn and act appropriately. That's all you can do.

Rob
You hit the nail on the head I’ve been riding for 50 yrs I couldn’t have said it any better!!
 

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Been driving a while now - drivers license in 1977 and both motorcycle and chauffer's license (original version of today's commercial driver license) in 1979.
Continued driving a variety of trucks off and on for over 30 years.
I found that driving trucks made me a better rider and vice versa.
The trucking companies had us in safety meetings every month and the best program I went through with them was the "Smith System Training Course" that focused on 5 keys---
1 - Aim high in steering
2 - Get the big picture
3 - Keep your eyes moving
4 - Leave yourself an out
5 - Make sure they see you
Each key covers a lot but is easy to do and with practice becomes habit.
I completed this program over 20 years ago but it has stuck with me more than any thing else.
And I still watch training videos irregularly - my thoughts are that it is worthwhile even if I only pick up one thing out of a session - that one thing could save someone's life.
This is a pretty quick read and I hope it is beneficial to many of you.
https://pamdrivingjobs.com/5-keys-t...1.,count “1,001, 1,002,... 3. Keep Your Eyes

Never worked for PAM but this is a nice overview of the material.
 

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Glad you are ok. I've been riding since I was 15 and am now 67. Lots of miles and lots of great bikes. Unfortunately this kind of crap happens a lot to us riders. You are smart to "get back on the horse". You can't let the fear grab hold or you become a timid fearful rider, which is another kind of bad. Back in 2005, after many years of riding I took an advance riders course. It taught me to constantly think "10-20-30". Always think what is happening 10 seconds ahead from where you are, 20 seconds from and 30 seconds from, and anticipate. That stuck with me. I always assume some person not paying attention will drift into my lane, or try to turn in front of me, or merge into me without looking. On blind curves I assume the car coming the other way might drift over the lines. And I never gun it when the light turns green in case some dumbass tries to run the opposing yellow and goes into the red. It becomes part of your riding, just like you don't think about looking in your mirrors when in a car, you just do it. Same on the bike. The one item I'm not seeing here is the advantage of loud pipes. There are lots of for vs against out there, but in my mind someone looking at their phone will not see that bright fancy headlight, or orange vest, or bright running lights. But they all hear the rumble of the pipes. First money spent on my 21 Challenger was for Tab Zombie slip on's. I feel better being loud.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
[/QUOTE]
You are very lucky. Several years ago a few of my mates were over from Australia doing the Route 66 ride on hired Harleys and the exact same thing happened, sadly the lead rider died at the scene, the next were a couple, the rider suffered brain damage from which he is still recovering, his wife had minor injuries and the rest were able to avoid the carnage. The driver of the pickup was never charged by police.
 

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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
I’ve been there.. always ride like you’re invisible
 

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Been driving a while now - drivers license in 1977 and both motorcycle and chauffer's license (original version of today's commercial driver license) in 1979.
Continued driving a variety of trucks off and on for over 30 years.
I found that driving trucks made me a better rider and vice versa.
The trucking companies had us in safety meetings every month and the best program I went through with them was the "Smith System Training Course" that focused on 5 keys---
1 - Aim high in steering
2 - Get the big picture
3 - Keep your eyes moving
4 - Leave yourself an out
5 - Make sure they see you
Each key covers a lot but is easy to do and with practice becomes habit.
I completed this program over 20 years ago but it has stuck with me more than any thing else.
And I still watch training videos irregularly - my thoughts are that it is worthwhile even if I only pick up one thing out of a session - that one thing could save someone's life.
This is a pretty quick read and I hope it is beneficial to many of you.
https://pamdrivingjobs.com/5-keys-truck-driving-safety/#:~:text=THE 5 KEYS TO SMITH SYSTEM DRIVING 1.,count “1,001, 1,002,... 3. Keep Your Eyes

Never worked for PAM but this is a nice overview of the material.
I believe #5 is where most riders fail. When in doubt, a little zig zag goes a long way.
 
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Folks:

I've been riding about 2.5 years now and had my first near accident yesterday. Country road, clear conditions, two lane road, 55 mph. A pickup truck coming from the other direction suddenly and without signal turned across my lane to go into a private driveway and I almost T-boned him.

It was absurd that he turned at that time. I don't know how I stopped in time without hitting him and without going down. I saw him staring at his cell phone as he completed the turn -- it was in his right hand that was on the steering wheel. The only explanation I have that he would make that turn is that he didn't see me (which is nuts -- I ride a Chieftain (fairly big bike) and always have all three of my front lights on) because he was glued to his phone.

I'm simultaneously angry, shaken, grateful, and more humble and aware.

I'm not saying anything you don't know, but the scary thing is there is nothing any of us can do to prevent idiots like this from driving like this; we just have to be vigilant. (Maybe there are small things I can do to improve visibility; my dad used to ride BMWs for years and wore florescent safety vests). I'm going for a ride this morning to try to prevent getting "afraid of the ball" to use an old little league baseball expression.

I love riding and need it as a release but something like this puts a whole lot of things into focus. I don't know what I expect any of you to write back...how do you shake off something like that? Does it make you consider giving up riding (which I don't want to do)? Would love you hear from some of you folks who have been riding awhile and have perspective on something like this...

Thank you. Ride safely.
Glad your safe. You’ll encounter many more situations like that be safe, stay alert. 😎
 
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