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Ladies and gents,
I am reading a few different articles on what people do to care for their leather, but most are caring for black leather. What have some of you done to care for and waterproof the tan leather seat and saddlebags?
 

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Ladies and gents,
I am reading a few different articles on what people do to care for their leather, but most are caring for black leather. What have some of you done to care for and waterproof the tan leather seat and saddlebags?
Hi USMC, you can never completely waterproof leather (well, maybe for 60 miles or so, but it eventually starts getting soggy - best find a beer shop and wait till the rain stops..). Treating it with dubbin helps repel water a bit, though some say it rots the stitching eventually. Mink oil is probably better - I've been using both on and off in the changeable weather down here, but the beer shop solution works pretty well - cheers, Pat
 

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I just used Fieblings Aussi Leather Conditioner for the first time (bike is new so this is the first application). I sourced it from a local saddlery supply store. Seems like a good product and no discoloration but cannot offer any long term results.

15 OZ. AUSSIE LEATHER CONDITIONER

Kevin
 

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Love the Leather Honey conditioner and cleaner.
 

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I used Lexol Cleaner and then Lexol Conditioner. I wanted to use Blue Magic, but I couldn't find any. I've read that both are about the same though anyway. No discoloration. They worked great for me. I have also heard of people using mink oil though, like DrPat said.
 

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Seems to me just about anything with leather cleaner written on it will do the job. There is a lot out there. Don't think the same product has been mentioned twice,....
Alpal
 

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Are you currently using this stuff? Any discoloration?
Yes, I have used it all last year. I purchased both the Leather Cream & Waterproofing. No discoloration at all. In fact, now don't be laugh'n, because it wasn't funny at the time- I went over to my mom's one day last year & it was hot as hell out, so being the smart mo-fo I'am I parked the RM under the walnut tree. I don't know we was in visiting & my sister came over, I suppose about 3hrs had passed & we walked outside & I noticed some shit on my bike, a f&^*'n squirrel decided he would chomp the hell out of some walnuts & the black shit all fell down on my bike, I was so embarrassed at myself for not being smart enough to know what would happen. Well, the black shit wouldn't come off of the seat, stained it, real good. Spots of that shit all over it. So when I got home I got the leather cream out & went to work on it, some of them stains were stubborn but they all came out, then I waterproofed it again. I swear by that stuff. I had to rub hard on some of them stains but I was relieved they all came out. What a friggin idiot!!
 

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Hi USMC, you can never completely waterproof leather (well, maybe for 60 miles or so, but it eventually starts getting soggy - best find a beer shop and wait till the rain stops..). Treating it with dubbin helps repel water a bit, though some say it rots the stitching eventually. Mink oil is probably better - I've been using both on and off in the changeable weather down here, but the beer shop solution works pretty well - cheers, Pat
I agree, the pub solution definitely sounds like the best idea!!!
 

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2014 or 2015 leather?
Very different.
I saddle oil mine (2014) & also have used the Aussie leather wax
I just purchased a new 2016 RM. What is different between the seats on the 2014-2015?
 

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The 2015 plus Indian tan leather has been sealed with a waterproof, UV protected coating. I've been experimenting with some Indian tan leather straps that I did not use. They have been hanging outside exposed to SoCal sun for 22 months and have not changed color, appearance, or feel.

The new Indian Tan (don't know about the black) will not absorb leather balm, mink oil, ect. I have been using leather cleaner and a uv protector, and that's all.
 

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Had Good Luck with Fiebings Mink Oil Paste for a lot of years although am sure are other good ones as well .. Have a Leather Jacket at least 20 years old and has kept my Victory OEM Seat looking Great for 4+ Years and 75,000+ Miles Just Fine ..

MinkOil.jpg
 

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Morning tribe.....
I own a horse farm and the ladies of the family are eventers. (Those folks who run and jump through the woods with their butts on fire). Anyway... The leatherwork we use is monsterously expensive (saddles/tack). We've found no real way to waterproof leather without it cracking over time. We "condition" our leathers using "Moss leather care"....which is a goat milk saddle soap, available at "bitofbritan.com". I use it on my scout and scout 60 without issues about 3-4 times a month. Just passing on what works for us.

-steve-
 

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I continue to read these threads on how to care for the Scout's leather somewhat confused. Let me try to add some clarity with the little knowledge of this topic that I have. First I will only address the Indian Tan which I have owned now for 22 months, and not the black which I have no experience with. When Polaris started installing tan leather on their first Chief's they had major issues with the leather color and overall appearance of the saddlebags etc, and did become a warranty issue. Indian overcame this problem by using a UV/weather resistant sealant on the tan leather. As I've stated on prior posts I had extra Indian Tan straps to experiment with when it came time for me to refinish the bags, so I placed a couple outdoors exposed to full South California sun/weather.

What you see in the photo is one of those exposed straps sitting on my saddlebag which again is 22 months old, and is only exposed to sun when I ride (Scout now has 35,000 miles which I know is a lot of miles in a short time, but I have no other life:confused:). The leather on my Scout is in mint condition. I use two products on the Indian leather about once a month; Lexol leather cleaner, finished with 303 marine/recreational Aerospace Protectant. On my Corbin leather saddle I use Skidmore's leather cream, although I would use any quality leather treatment such as Fiebings Mink Oil Paste etc.

My point is; and this is only my opinion but using oils/creams etc. on Indian Tan Leather is a waste of time/money as these products do not penetrate into the leather. Don't think any harm is being done to the Indian Tan leather but it's like putting these products onto "real imitation leather or Plether" I do think the approach I've been using would be more useful in caring for Indian Tan leather. Again these is just my thoughts on the subject.

I've been playing around with leather dyes for a few years and continue to follow this topic, as I did not have a clue how to penetrate the sealant used on Indian Tan leather until Chris; October 16, 2016 post #1 "Leather Colour Change" Tackled the problem. I have re-posted his post below. And thanks again Chris.
Chris Said:
I bought some brown leather saddlebags off eBay and fitted them to my Scout using Easy Brackets.
After a short while I decided to dye the saddlebags, seat and tank pouch matt black. Bought a recolouring kit from The Furniture Clinic and got stuck in, hoping for the best. Turned out not to be difficult, just time consuming to get the leather prepped properly, all the coats of dye, fixer and topcoat on, about twenty hours in all. I am pleased with the result. I wanted the brown leather seat when I first bought the Scout for its heritage, even though I didn't like it much, I hoped I would warm to it, but was never really satisfied with the colour.

Brian Meyers said;
This current use of Indian Tan leather has been treated so that it will hold up better then prior Indian tan leather products. So my questions are: how did it take to the penetration of the you're dye, What process did you use to strip the clear coat or treatment from the leather. And also you did a great job of it, they look really great.

Chris Said:

I did the panniers first as they were cheap enough to practice on. The kit I bought had a scourer pad, (though 0000 steel wool would do just as well), as well as the sealant remover, which is acetone. This worked well to get back to the leather.
The seat took a little more work with the acetone and scourer, but did the job well, removing all the sealant. A wipe over with a cloth soaked in acetone removes any dissolved sealant that has dried back on, the acetone evaporates quickly.
I applied four coats of dye using a foam pad, the first coat looks awful, but each successive coats improves the job, it takes to the leather very well. Two more coats sprayed on to get a good even finish, three coats of sealant sprayed on, three coats of finish sprayed on. Leave it in the warm to cure, then leather feed to put back some of the oils the acetone removed.
I can scratch the seat hard with my finger nail with no problem. Also what pleased me was when putting on the leather feed no colour came off on the white cloth I used, which shows all has taken and cured well.
Cheers, Cris

Hope this post sheds some better light on Indian Tan leather.:)
 

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You can get your leather fairly impervious to water with several different products, and some good ones have been suggested, but it is almost impossible to waterproof the seams in the seat. I would think some of the beeswax type conditioners might be a little sticky to sit on once you warm them up with butt heat, but I've never tried them on a seat and don't know for sure. I've used them on boots and they worked well. I bought an Ultimate seat a bit back and it is a super heavy grade of vinyl that is absolutely waterproof, but even that will leak water through the seams. Another option if you have to leave it out in the rain is to get a seat cover. That way you're not riding on a leather covered piece of water saturated foam rubber the next day. Even better is a quality full cover or something overhead to keep the rain off.
 
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