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Whelp, here we go. One of the most highly contested subjects in motorcycling is now a reality for the Scout.

What is the proper break-in method for the Scout?

The dealer is going to tell you to go by the manual and not go above 1/3 throttle for the first 90 miles while you vary engine speed and load. Then from 91-300, you are not go go above 1/2 throttle and again vary engine speed frequently. After that, you are able to ride for the next 200 miles (301-500) without operating above 3/4 throttle. After you take your new bike in for the 500 mile service, you will be free to rev the motor freely.

Others subscribe to the Motoman break-in method. It is also known as the "rough break-in." This method basically states that you should ride the thing like you stole it to properly seat the rings. It is claimed that you can actually seat the rings much faster than the 500 mile interval and actually mitigate any sort of power loss that might occur from improper sealing of the rings and decrease blow by. This method can be found here: Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

How are you going to break in your motor?
 

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MFR break in methods are basically impossible, if not improbable. I always tell our customers to ride it "normal". Don't lug it, don't run it to redline. Vary your speeds and use engine breaking. Everybody thinks pistons, rings, cylinder seasoning but much more to new bike break in. Brake pads mating to rotors, tranny gears meshing, friction plates meshing, etc. I always believe the 1st 100 miles are critical so I'm always aware of shift patterns, braking, etc. I'd really like to drain that fancy 15w60 full syn and put in good old fashion 15w40 Rotella for the 1st 150 miles, drain and then put back in the synthetic oil but doubt I'll do that. Just ride it and enjoy :)
 
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I'm going to roll the dice with Motoman. The last time this topic rolled around this forum I couldn't find anybody that said that it wrecked their motor. Good luck to everybody with their break ins.
 

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THE BEST METHOD to break in the Scout engine would be to try to adhere to the manufacturers suggestions on the break in. Anything else is guessing. Who made anyone else an expert on the Scout engine, and gives their opinion more validation than the Indian Mo Co?

I just read the MotoMan's report. It is good. I think some valid points to consider are;
1. The setup tech in most cases does take the bike out for a "nice" test ride. I have done this many times and had little concern. I have tried to take it easy on my new engines, but never seem to go 500 miles before turning it on.
2. I have changed my oil shortly after the engine has been running because I feel that there is a lot of materials from assembly, dust, and new parts getting the rough edges worn off happens quickly. Those contaminants should end up in the oil filter before recirculating, but they are still part of the lubrication system until you change the oil and filter.

I believe that the motor company's stance has to be a "one size fits all" approach. Most of us will either push the bike too little, or too much. The Mo Co's break in procedure is the safest for the general population because we will all interpret it with our riding style. I can never adhere to the manufacturers recommendations completely. I take it easy for the first few miles, but then run it through the gears. I do vary the speeds and bring the RPMs up, But for only short periods of times. I don't cruise to get the miles on. I think the most valid point MotoMan makes it to warm up the engine adequately first. That being said, How each individual "interprets" the break in procedure can be as different as night and day.
 

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I'd really like to drain that fancy 15w60 full syn and put in good old fashion 15w40 Rotella for the 1st 150 miles, drain and then put back in the synthetic oil but doubt I'll do that.

Troop, where did you read that the oil in the Scout is full synthetic?



The only oil on the official Indian web page for sale for Indian use is a Semi-synthetic blend.

Indian Motor Oil | Indian Motorcycle Store
 

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While rebuilding H-Ds for people on their way to or from the Sturgis rally, I got asked the question about break in when they had to travel hundreds if not thousands of miles to get home. I would tell them to stay off the interstate and get on some of the back roads that paralleled the interstate so their speeds would vary more. I would tell them to warm their bike up for only 2-3 minutes and go. I'd give them an oil change kit and give them a designated spot an hour down the road to change it. Don't be afraid of higher RPMS and don't baby it in the low RPM ranges. After their oil change, ride it like they normally would, but keep changing the RPMs and don't be afraid to get on it. Try to take the scenic routes home instead of the interstate. That may not fit what I said earlier about following the manufacturer's break in procedure, but back to the interpretation. Some people interpret NO, as to try a different approach for a YES answer.
 

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Lots of opinions on doing this I find the Key is don't hold Steady Throttle at one Speed for too long .. Leaving Ocala back to lake City is about 70 Miles if Interstate it .. I did a Roundabout Route which had lots of Varied Speed Limits .. For about the First 20 Miles never had it above 70 but varied it from 45-70 the whole time Never ever short shifting but winding the Gears up to about 4,000 RPM Before Shifting and Not Downshifting too late either .. Load and Speed is what gives your Piston and Liners a Seal and Make good use of the Liners Cross Hatch Pattern .. Overloading is not that good IMHO and Underloading is even worse .. To Keep it Simple Ride it Fast and Furious but don't Abuse it and Give it a Rest Period of 15-20 Mins at 50 Miles in the First Hundred has been working for me for years .. From there on Pretty Much Ride it as you would Normally just don't prolong the Same RPM's or Speed for any long length of time like deciding to take a road trip and Run 100 Miles straight in 6th Gear at a steady 70 MPH .. Load it Up, Back it Off . Repeat .. After 500 Miles and Fresh Oil Ride it like you stole it and enjoy the ride .. This is how broke my Last 2 New Engines in One a 2009 Ultra that had 70,000 Miles on it when traded it in and while had some issues with it None were with the Engine or Tranny .. Did the Same with my 2012 Victory Cross Country and now has 48,000 Totally trouble free Miles on it ..
 

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I usually ride any of my new motorcycle for the first 100 miles with what the recommended manufacturer outline in their owners manual and after that I ride it like I stole it. I've done that on my 92 FATBOY,94 Heritage, 99 Hayabusa, 99 ZX6R and both of my little 2014 honda Groms and I still own all those motorcycles and had ZERO issues with them and that is the way I'm going to break in my new 2015 Indian Scout as soon as Hollister Power House gets my RED Indian Scout in, was told it should be in some time between Dec 20-Jan 1 time frame.
 

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Your first post to the forum, welcome and congrats on your Scout order. :)
 

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Many completed " heat cycles" (maybe 20 or 30) are required to fully stabilise metal components and ease any manufacturing stresses. Break in is not just about the piston rings to cylinder bore fit, that is just one of several important considerations. The number of completed heat cycles might be a better way of giving consideration to overall break in, rather than just running up 500. miles (which could be completed in as little as 2 or 3 heat cycles, and bike is most definitely not run in - though it would be good / safe practice to put fresh oil in at that point at least).
A heat cycle is going from cold to a fully warmed up condition and then back to cold. Let's say a 20 mile varied load ride. And like somebody else said, brakes, linkages levers, bushings and bearings that are not part of the engine and transmission also get bedded in.

Happy new year to all,

Cheers,
Luke.
 

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Many completed " heat cycles" (maybe 20 or 30) are required to fully stabilise metal components and ease any manufacturing stresses. Break in is not just about the piston rings to cylinder bore fit, that is just one of several important considerations. The number of completed heat cycles might be a better way of giving consideration to overall break in, rather than just running up 500. miles (which could be completed in as little as 2 or 3 heat cycles, and bike is most definitely not run in - though it would be good / safe practice to put fresh oil in at that point at least).
A heat cycle is going from cold to a fully warmed up condition and then back to cold. Let's say a 20 mile varied load ride. And like somebody else said, brakes, linkages levers, bushings and bearings that are not part of the engine and transmission also get bedded in.

Happy new year to all,

Cheers,
Luke.
I like the terms, varied heated cycling 20 to 30 times per month. I was much younger then. Best wishes into the new year.
 

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Both bikes I've had I went sort of easy for 100 miles or so, lots of engine braking, varied speed and some quick acceleration but not too much. Like Luke was saying it was always stressed to me that for the first 100-150 miles the most important thing is to take shorter trips (15 - 20 miles) then stop and let the bike cool all the way off.

Also made sure to apply smooth, even pressure to the brakes so all that stuff gets broken in okay.

Then after 100 or 150 miles I'd start to get on 'em pretty good, not quite balls out but close. Longer trips but still not too long. Think I changed the oil at about 250 or so and pretty much continued to do what I was doing. After I got around 500 I changed the oil again and let 'em rip.

I've always had bikes with small thumpers and it seems like once you start getting close to 1000 miles is when you can really feel the cylinder building power more smoothly.
 

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The dealer is going to tell you to go by the manual and not go above 1/3 throttle for the first 90 miles while you vary engine speed and load. Then from 91-300, you are not go go above 1/2 throttle and again vary engine speed frequently. After that, you are able to ride for the next 200 miles (301-500) without operating above 3/4 throttle. After you take your new bike in for the 500 mile service, you will be free to rev the motor freely.
Is this the method verbatim from the manual? If not, can someone post the method verbatim? I was looking to ride back from the dealer but not when it's 150 or so miles.
 

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The owners manual for the 2015 Scout is on the WEB. One of the post here has a link for it, read it several months ago, didn't save it. Do a search in the Scout forum.
 

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Is this the method verbatim from the manual? If not, can someone post the method verbatim? I was looking to ride back from the dealer but not when it's 150 or so miles.

Probably is what it says in the manual, but drive it like you stole it! (I didn't tell you this!) :)

Take it easy the first few miles and make sure everything is tying every knot and sounds good.

Then drive it pretty much as you wish keeping a close eye on the temperature gauge.

It will let you know if your doing something wrong! If the temp rises, slow down or snap throttle closed to wash cylinders!

DO vary the speed a lot, frequently letting the closed throttle wash fresh gas into the cylinders.

Go the full mileage suggested (500) before you change the oil and filter.
It is called 'break-in oil' for a reason!
Changing it before the engine is truly broke in defeats the purpose of having break-in oil in the engine.
If you dump in fresh oil prematurely it may stop any benefits of rings or gears seating in fully!

Done this for the last 10 or 12 bikes with zero problems. None have every failed me, broke down in any way or used oil!
My last (3rd) ST-1100 had about 160,000 on it when I sold it and it is still kicking ass with the new owner.
 

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The owners manual for the 2015 Scout is on the WEB. One of the post here has a link for it, read it several months ago, didn't save it. Do a search in the Scout forum.
I wasn't aware it was on the WEB (aka IntardNets). Thanks for the tip to STFA.

(EDIT - text added below)

Engine Break-In
The engine break-in period for your motorcycle is the first 500 miles (800 km) of operation. During this break-in period, critical engine parts require special wear-in procedures so they seat and mate properly. Read, understand and follow all break-in procedures to ensure the long-term performance and durability of your engine.

NOTICE:
Failure to properly follow the engine break-in procedures outlined in this manual can result in serious damage to the engine. Follow all break-in procedures carefully. Avoid full throttle operation and other conditions that may place an excessive load on the engine during the break-in period. The more cautiously you treat your motorcycle during the break-in period, the more satisfied you will be with its performance later on. Overloading the engine at low RPM and/or running the engine prematurely at high RPM may result in damage to the pistons and/or other engine components.​

Observe the following precautions during the break-in period:
  • Upon initial start-up, do not allow the engine to idle for long periods as overheating can occur.
  • Avoid fast starts with wide open throttle. Drive slowly until the engine warms up.
  • Avoid running the engine at extremely low RPM in higher gears (lugging the engine).
  • Drive within the recommended operating speeds and gears.
Odometer - Miles​
Break-in Procedure
0-90​
Do not operate for extended periods above 1/3 throttle or at any one throttle position. Vary engine speed
frequently.
91-300​
Do not operate for extended periods above 1/2 throttle or at any one throttle position. Vary engine speed
frequently.
301-500​
Do not operate for extended periods above 3/4 throttle
At 500​
Perform the break-in maintenance outlined in the maintenance section of this manual. Break-in maintenance
should be performed by an authorized INDIAN MOTORCYCLE dealer. Break-in maintenance must include
inspection, adjustments, fastener tightening and an engine oil and filter change. Performing break-in
maintenance at the required odometer reading helps ensure peak engine performance, minimal exhaust
emissions and maximum service life of the engine.
[TBODY] [/TBODY]
 

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Probably is what it says in the manual, but drive it like you stole it! (I didn't tell you this!) :)

Take it easy the first few miles and make sure everything is tying every knot and sounds good.

Then drive it pretty much as you wish keeping a close eye on the temperature gauge.

It will let you know if your doing something wrong! If the temp rises, slow down or snap throttle closed to wash cylinders!

DO vary the speed a lot, frequently letting the closed throttle wash fresh gas into the cylinders.

Go the full mileage suggested (500) before you change the oil and filter.
It is called 'break-in oil' for a reason!
Changing it before the engine is truly broke in defeats the purpose of having break-in oil in the engine.
If you dump in fresh oil prematurely it may stop any benefits of rings or gears seating in fully!

Done this for the last 10 or 12 bikes with zero problems. None have every failed me, broke down in any way or used oil!
My last (3rd) ST-1100 had about 160,000 on it when I sold it and it is still kicking ass with the new owner.
I've done similar for other machines in the past. For example, the week after I bought a Highlander, we drove it from Chicago to Bryce Canyon.
However, for the Scout I want to go MFR reco.
 
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