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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an attempt to try to make these long days pass by quicker as I wait for the arrival of my new Scout, I downloaded the owners manual and had a good read. The break in procedure was the typical slow cautious procedure that I expected. I have had many bikes over the years, but this is my first new one so I want to break it in right. Do any of you have any experience with the method as outlined on www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm ? My son used this method on a Warrior he bought a few year back with seemingly great results.
 

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No idea I'm in the same boat buddy
 

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I'll follow the manual when I get my Scout. If the factory is saying "this is what you should do for the first 500 miles", well, guess they know best. I'm patiently waiting...

Oh, and that site is just full of wanting you to buy, subscribe and whatever else they can toss at you. I'm not a wrench turner and it all maybe very valid but that site smells of something deeper...

Keep the faith! The Scout will be here soon!
 

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The most important thing you need to happen in a new engine is to get the piston rings seated as soon as possible.
Keep in mind the piston rings are in constant motion within the cylinders.
As the throttle is increased or decreased, the rings expand and contract in their bores becoming tighter fitting as the expanding gas pressure increases and contracting when the pressure decreases.
You need to make these rings work, during the early stages of an engines life, in order to thoroughly "seat" or match them to the bore of the cylinder.
The cylinder walls of an engine are not as smooth as glass. They have a honing pattern that is put in during manufacture that is called a "crosshatch". This pattern helps the oil to better adhere to the cylinder walls for lubrication and cooling.
Allowing the engine to run too long with the rings in a semi relaxed state will allow a film to develop on the cylinder walls, which will fill this crosshatch and become smooth and shiny.
This is called "glazing" and is NOT something you want to happen.
Once a cylinder becomes glazed, the rings will not properly seat and the engine will be a smoker and an oil burner.
So, what I'm telling you is Work that throttle....allow those rings to expand and contract and force them tight against the cylinder walls repeatedly.
You are not doing your engine any favors by babying it.
The way you break it in, is the way it will perform best throughout its life.

This is pretty much what the author is telling you in the above mentioned article.
 

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I've always used hard break-in. One thing to consider is that the factory runs it in for you on a dyno before it leaves the factory, so no real need to follow the manual.
 

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I've always used hard break-in. One thing to consider is that the factory runs it in for you on a dyno before it leaves the factory, so no real need to follow the manual.
Didn't think about that but it makes a lot of sense. Nice tidbit of info Dr_Doom.
 

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Didn't think about that but it makes a lot of sense. Nice tidbit of info Dr_Doom.
I believe they recommend their break in procedure as a legal liability thing. The factory has no idea what the level of experience is on anything that they sell and would rather not have a rider go out and wipe out straight out of the dealership. They tell you that you need to baby thing so that you take your time to familiarize yourself with the bike, and in a more extreme event where you have never ridden a bike, maybe learn how to ride it in the break in period.
 

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The most important thing you need to happen in a new engine is to get the piston rings seated as soon as possible.
Keep in mind the piston rings are in constant motion within the cylinders.
As the throttle is increased or decreased, the rings expand and contract in their bores becoming tighter fitting as the expanding gas pressure increases and contracting when the pressure decreases.
You need to make these rings work, during the early stages of an engines life, in order to thoroughly "seat" or match them to the bore of the cylinder.
The cylinder walls of an engine are not as smooth as glass. They have a honing pattern that is put in during manufacture that is called a "crosshatch". This pattern helps the oil to better adhere to the cylinder walls for lubrication and cooling.
Allowing the engine to run too long with the rings in a semi relaxed state will allow a film to develop on the cylinder walls, which will fill this crosshatch and become smooth and shiny.
This is called "glazing" and is NOT something you want to happen.
Once a cylinder becomes glazed, the rings will not properly seat and the engine will be a smoker and an oil burner.
So, what I'm telling you is Work that throttle....allow those rings to expand and contract and force them tight against the cylinder walls repeatedly.
You are not doing your engine any favors by babying it.
The way you break it in, is the way it will perform best throughout its life.

This is pretty much what the author is telling you in the above mentioned article.
Eggs Ackley.
Done it and it works.
 

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Howdy Folks,
I was trained as an automotive machinest by a couple of instructors at St. Phillip's College, the vocational school for the San Antonio College system, in the early '80s. They had learned their trade in the Army during WWII. They taught us, when building an engine for maximum mileage, to fit the parts tight. For example, if a final running clearance of .002 - .004 thousandths of an inch was desired for the piston/cylinder clearance, we'd fit the pistons at .0015 and allow them to self-hone the remaining .0005+ during the initial break-in miles. This approach held for bearings, valves, and other parts throughout the engine and transmission. The tight engine meant that you had to be very careful during the first 1,000 miles or so not to allow the engine to over-heat which could cause parts to gall and seize. That's what the break-in regime of avoiding prolonged idling, using partial throttle, and constantly varying engine speed was about.

The computer-numeric-controlled machine tools used in manufacturing modern engines and transmissions are far more accurate than the manually-controlled machine tools of the past. They have vibration sensors on cutting tools that alert the machinist to the chatter of a dulling tool far sooner than the human ear could detect it. A much higher degree of manufacturing tolerance control is possible, and so careful break-in is not as important as it once was.

When I picked up Chieftain #873 in El Paso last January I had a 300 mile ride on Interstate 10 and Highway 90 to return home. Temperatures were in the 40's (F). I shifted between 4th, 5th and 6th gears as I ran down the road and would smoothly accelerate from 2,000 rpm to 5,000 rpm, then coast down on compression. Within a week I had 500 miles on the bike and performed the initial service. I rode the bike from there on without taking any special precautions. The engine got quieter and stronger to about 2,500 miles, at which point I considered it fully broken in.

Do many folks pay any attention to break-in recommendations with their new vehicles these days? Meh, not so much. And the quality of the manufacturing is such that it really doesn't make much difference.

--- Randall
 

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I agree with Randall that break in is not as critical as it once was. You will always get alot of opinions on this from "take it easy" to "ride it like you stole it". Some folks say and believe you run them hard starting from day 1 and you will have a better running engine then someone who broke one in easy. It's your bike and everyone will do what they think is best. Me, I pretty much do what they tell me to do as I figure they built it and they should know what is best for it. I also know that if you start having "issues", like I am with excessive noise, I wouldn't feel right about going to them bitching about it had I not followed their break in procedures. There needs to be integrity on both sides, you have to have the integrity to do what they ask you to do, they have to have the integrity to fix something that goes wrong if you have done what they asked you to do. I want to be able to look them in the eye and tell I did what you asked me to do, so now it's your turn, fix my bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks to all of you who responded to my question. It is hard to go against the manufacturer's break in procedure since logic would cause you to believe that they would know best. However, after reading your replies and the rest of the articles on the mototuneusa sight, I have concluded that the hard break in procedure is the way to go. The photos of broken down race engine parts are very convincing. I have been to the plant on multiple occasions where these bikes are built and have seen how they dino every bike they build. I remember thinking at the time that it seemed extreme given their break in recommendations. I now realize that instead of causing premature wear during this testing procedure, they were actually starting the break in process for me. Everyone must break in their bike as they see fit, but don't be upset with me when I blow by you and the service department as well. Happy riding, hopefully soon!

Chris
 

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I can attest that the "baby it" method is NOT the best. My first 5.0 Mustang (a 1985-last of the carburetor 5.0) I treated the engine with kid gloves; no red line until 1000 miles, gentle acceleration the first 500 miles, etc. The end result was a very nice SLUG of a car...never revved well, never had the power that my friend's 5.0L Mustangs had. My next 5.0L Mustang (a 1988 notchback), I treated gently for about 50 miles, changed the oil, and then revved to and from red line, taking the vehicle on a 300 mile road trip working the clutch and accelerator, varying both engine and vehicle speeds constantly. The end result was a very quick car that loved to rev. So, my Scout will benefit from the hard break-in.
 

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I think a "majority" of people can get away with riding the bike the way they always do for break in. Here is how I plan on breaking in mine. I will follow the manual within reason. I will bring the RPMs up for "short" moments without sustaining those RPMs for any lengthy periods. After the 500 mile oil change and service I will "gradually" start to bring it close to redline during warm full throttle "RPM runs". I will not cruise for any length of time at one sustained speed. No reason not to have fun with the new Scout, but I'm not going to try to make an oil burner out of it either.
 

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I recall a lot of break in periods stating to drive an different speeds and not to drive at a constant speed for long periods. I believe this goes along with the piston ring explanation mentioned earlier.
 

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Here's a thought on your break-in...
Was the bike that you bought one that you or anyone else used for a test ride? Hattiesburg Cycles will let you test ride anything on their floor. I bought my test ride bike with about 150 miles on it. On my test ride, I certainly "rode" it and didn't baby it at all. Did any customer before me treat it with kid gloves? I doubt it. I also know that one of the salesman created quite a burnout show with one of the Classics that was on the floor.
 
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