Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know the dot 4 fluid naturally absorbs moisture over time. And my question is should I change it before the recommended miles? Just don't know if it's worth the time and money to do it. Or if the owners manual recommendations is sufficient. It's a 2016 chief dark horse i purchased new off the showroom floor. It only has 6500km (or around4000 miles) on it. Just wondering what others have done with their bikes is all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm going to have to read my book again. If that's the case I'll get the fluid changed out. Thanks for the reply
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I know the dot 4 fluid naturally absorbs moisture over time. And my question is should I change it before the recommended miles? Just don't know if it's worth the time and money to do it. Or if the owners manual recommendations is sufficient. It's a 2016 chief dark horse i purchased new off the showroom floor. It only has 6500km (or around4000 miles) on it. Just wondering what others have done with their bikes is all.
Brake fluid is a hydroscopic fluid in a relatively sealed system. Regardless of mileage, brake fluid absorbs moisture and that is what makes turn dark. I wouldn't worry about the mileage and stick solely to a 2 yr schedule if that is what the manual recommends.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
Everyone’s opinion on this varies. If it starts clouding up I’ll change it. Otherwise 2 full seasons I’ve run up to 40,000 quite a few times in 2 seasons never an issue.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
4,118 Posts
Brake fluid is a hydroscopic fluid in a relatively sealed system. Regardless of mileage, brake fluid absorbs moisture and that is what makes turn dark. I wouldn't worry about the mileage and stick solely to a 2 yr schedule if that is what the manual recommends.

Yep when you flush the system and put new brake fluid in, it will amaze many on the different it makes. There is no give (Squish) in the brake Handel or pedal it is rock solid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Replies are correct, it is more time related them mileage. But even more importantly it is affected by environment. A bike ridden and/oe kept in the rain or wet environment is going to get contaminated much quicker then one that is kept in an air conditioned garage and ridden on sunny days. This should be rather obvious. What is important is pay attention, learn to look, inspect your bike, what does the fluid look like, how do they brakes feel. Then you should know when it needs serviced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
I put about 24,000km on in a year. Had my brake fluid and fork fluid replaced last spring, definitely noticed a difference. I'll be doing it again this year.

Stephen
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
Any DOT 4 will do? I'm a fan of Wilwood stuff, but don't think ot makes a difference

Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
369 Posts
What amazes me is that people fail to make the simplest safety improvements to their cars, trucks, bikes, etc. Flushing the lines, cylinder, and calipers with new fluid is easy and cheap. The degradation of fluid is gradual to the point it drops off a cliff. The main reason for this is it’s propensity to absorb moisture. Air in the lines due to not bleeding the lines puts moisture in the lines. Air heats, condenses, and is absorbed. Then the fluid gets hot again and the boiling temp has been lowered. Brake fade and fluid failure. Because of this gradual decline in performance, we tend to perceive it as normal, until we flush it. Don’t wait until you notice the change. That’s Chinese water torture. Replace it every 2-years and every brake component change.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top