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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I just wanted to say the front brake is not adequate enough to stop the Scout, at least for me. In order to get maximum braking you NEED to use the rear brake, no questions asked. This isn't the case for other high performance bikes which usually just need the front brake for the majority if their braking. Have any of you upgraded your front brake? Which did you go with?
 

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Hey everyone, I just wanted to say the front brake is not adequate enough to stop the Scout, at least for me. In order to get maximum braking you NEED to use the rear brake, no questions asked. This isn't the case for other high performance bikes which usually just need the front brake for the majority if their braking. Have any of you upgraded your front brake? Which did you go with?
In Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) training, they teach always using both brakes together so as to avoid fishtailing (if rear only) or excessive nose diving (if front only). Balancing the brake force to maintain best control. I make it a habit and its now muscle memory.

But to answer your question, there are previous posts about oversized rotors and calipers for the front (search it out), but they run into problems getting the caliper on over the larger rotor or when changing pads.
 
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.......Have any of you upgraded your front brake? Which did you go with?....
With my riding style and the rolling mass weight of both the Taylor-Made split rim wheels together with the 300-width rear tire the brakes were indeed inadequate. I opted for a manufacturer that has been in the game for years whose quality is well renowned over here, and the calipers come in a range of different style and finishes. Harrison Billet. 6-Pots up front and 4-Pots rear. The rear is repositioned with a bracket over the disc rather than below as standard and a longer rear brake pipe is required. With 6-pots up front I no longer have to grab as much of a handful or use the rear at all as I did with the OEM brakes. Original rotors and no bother with pad changes as Harrison supply 39mm pad overhaul kits. Issues only arise if you don't use the Harrison pads and they are not the correct depth to begin with.

Indian weren't listed on their dated website, but they do them as you can see.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
With my riding style and the rolling mass weight of both the Taylor-Made split rim wheels together with the 300-width rear tire the brakes were indeed inadequate. I opted for a manufacturer that has been in the game for years whose quality is well renowned over here, and the calipers come in a range of different style and finishes. Harrison Billet. 6-Pots up front and 4-Pots rear. The rear is repositioned with a bracket over the disc rather than below as standard and a longer rear brake pipe is required. With 6-pots up front I no longer have to grab as much of a handful or use the rear at all as I did with the OEM brakes. Original rotors and no bother with pad changes as Harrison supply 39mm pad overhaul kits. Issues only arise if you don't use the Harrison pads and they are not the correct depth to begin with.

Indian weren't listed on their dated website, but they do them as you can see.

View attachment 713018

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Awesome information, thank you. They look really good as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've never understood people who never use the rear brake. Yes, 70% of braking is in the front, but would you accept 70% of the horsepower?
You should be using both brakes.
I do use both brakes, but I feel I shouldn't need to. My GSXR has about 90% of the braking power in the front brake. I like it that way. I just don't think the front brake is adequate, especially for where I live and drive.
 

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the weight distribution of the scout, or any cruiser, as well as the rake, and geometry is far different from a sport bike.
They put 90% on a sport bike because as you load the front of the bike, the rear has very little traction left
That's not the case with a cruiser.

This might shock the forum communities but engineers generally do know what they are doing.
 

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what teamcurtis said - on a GSXR you're correct, the rear break is basically optional. On any bike that can do a 'stoppie' you can get 100% of your braking with the front brakes. Cruisers are not the same animal, lower center of gravity, longer wheelbase, different geometery all mean that you will stop faster using rear brakes wiht the fronts. That said I don't find the front brakes on my wifes scout to be very good and would love to see a good reliable upgrade that increases brake effectivness.
 

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I wouldn't be upset if my front brake had more modulation, but it can also pretty easily activate the ABS. That means its using all the traction available in that front tire.
A bigger brake isn't going to increase stopping power. It will however, add brake feel, modulation, and allow you to more precisely use the braking capabilities of that front tire.
BUT you're still giving up 30% if nott using the back brake. That rear tire has plenty of weight on it even when locking up the front, use it!
 

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Can always do a sportbike front suspension set up. I’m sure someone around here has done it
Indeed, a couple of people have!

FTR front end twin discs anyone?

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Or one could consider a Yamaha R1 front end if you fancy a change?

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Whatever you do it'll still be a level entry cruiser/bar hopper, depends how deep your pockets are and how far you want to go within the realms of practicality? The top one is impressive, BBK, 139BHP and nitrous.

As a footnote, road, riding conditions and many other factors determine whether I use both brakes and when I do it's normally at a 60/40 rate front and rear respectively. More often than not by reading these conditions correctly rear brake usage can often be curtailed completely.
 

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2022 Chief Bobber Dark Horse, 2021 Vintage, 2019 FTR-RR, 2021 Scout Bobber, 1977 Yamaha XS750
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Hey everyone, I just wanted to say the front brake is not adequate enough to stop the Scout, at least for me. In order to get maximum braking you NEED to use the rear brake, no questions asked. This isn't the case for other high performance bikes which usually just need the front brake for the majority if their braking. Have any of you upgraded your front brake? Which did you go with?
Look for the “Free Spirits” Brembo brake upgrade for Scout. (You can also add a 320mm Newfren rotor if you like.) This is the brake and rotor upgrade on my Scout Bobber. I am very satisfied. The Brembo upgrade is much stronger than stock. The kit utilizes the stock reservoir and brake lines and if fully compatible with the ABS system.
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Those are a couple of nice set-ups - Harris and Brembo! I bought my Scout ABS used and noticed there was very little wear on the front pads and rotor. I am a front braker, have been since the 80's (am also an old fart). My philosophy was that due to the majority of car driving we all do, in a puckering emergency situation, we will stomp on the rear brake but may not grab the front. To train myself to grab the front and gain an extra 70% braking force, I stopped using the rear and only used the front brake. Still do. Back to the current ride - I'm finding the front is getting more sensitive as the pads and rotor bed in. Even though the bike is the ABS model, I haven't braked hard enough to activate it and I originally compared it to the early Harley "ABS" system. That is, you needed to be a gorilla to manage to lock up the front wheel. Ride safe.
 
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