Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2017 Chieftain Dark Horse. I noticed when the bike was new that the rear brake disc had some slop/play in it. The disc is two pieces held together with what appears to be some type of rivets. I checked the front brake discs and they had no play or slop. The dealer said it was OK. After 32,000 miles the slop/play became greater and was creating noise in the backend. The dealer replaced under warranty. The new brake disc has the same play in it as the old one had when it was new. Can anyone tell me this normal and why?

Waiting to hear back from the dealer. Wondering if the part # for front and back are the same. Thanks for any input on this question. Not a big problem, but I'm thinking the disc will need to be changed again when the rivets wear down because of braking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,917 Posts
They are normally reasonably snug, but these are intended to be (semi) or full-floating rotors. Think THERMAL EXPANSION. The rivets you mention, I often call spools (but actually "floater buttons" or "bobbins" by the mfrs.), are intended to give the rotor some minimum float movement to allow for thermal expansion independent of your wheel and axle. These buttons are not dead tight in the carrier hub nor on the rotor fingers. If you can pick the bike off the ground, apply pressure to rear brake pedal, and then work rear wheel forward and back, you should not get any slack (movement) at all in the brake rotor or its bobbins. Although I would not personally run one with this problem, I don't know if Polaris has a parts issue or if they have directed their service techs to disregard some slack in said parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
They are normally reasonably snug, but these are intended to be (semi) or full-floating rotors. Think THERMAL EXPANSION. The rivets you mention, I often call spools (but actually "floater buttons" or "bobbins" by the mfrs.), are intended to give the rotor some minimum float movement to allow for thermal expansion independent of your wheel and axle. These buttons are not dead tight in the carrier hub nor on the rotor fingers. If you can pick the bike off the ground, apply pressure to rear brake pedal, and then work rear wheel forward and back, you should not get any slack (movement) at all in the brake rotor or its bobbins. Although I would not personally run one with this problem, I don't know if Polaris has a parts issue or if they have directed their service techs to disregard some slack in said parts.
Thanks for your reply. I talked to the dealer and they said the movement was normal. Doesn't seem right to me but I'll go with that for now. Next time I'm in the dealer i will check a new bike that is on the floor. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
At the dealer today and checked a new bike on the floor, there was a very small amount of movement in the floating part of the rotor. The front and back are different, front is 5 mils, and back is 7 mils thickness. Think I got that right. Anyway, it is what it is!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,917 Posts
At the dealer today and checked a new bike on the floor, there was a very small amount of movement in the floating part of the rotor. The front and back are different, front is 5 mils, and back is 7 mils thickness. Think I got that right. Anyway, it is what it is!
I checked out a number of older bikes... all of them tight. Perhaps with a bit of time and dirt in the joints they tighten up a little bit.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
862 Posts
It's pretty normal to have a bit of play. Sided to side more so than front to back free play. Front to back free play... depending on how much, is a indicator that the rotor should be replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
After riding I checked my back rotor and found it to be hot to the touch. Must be that thermal expansion "dieselgman" was talking about. Not sure if that is normal or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,917 Posts
After riding I checked my back rotor and found it to be hot to the touch. Must be that thermal expansion "dieselgman" was talking about. Not sure if that is normal or not.
If you run your rear brake very much at all, heat buildup is normal. I check brake calipers and rotors with wheels off the ground so that everything can be seen and felt while rolling the wheel/s. If you are just running the bike without using rear brake, then the rotor should not be too much more than warm. Check pad condition = thickness, equal wear, no scoring, no discoloration on rotor. Check that rotor spins true without any wobble at all and that the pads are not dragging when no brakes are applied. Then I do a hard high-speed brake test as well as gentle slow-speed, checking for smooth and gradual brake action equal to the amount of control pressures used in pedal and handle.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top