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Discussion Starter #1
I brought my '19 Bobber into @RACNRAY 's shop today for the 500 mile break in maintenance. We noticed that first of all the belt tension was really tight. While working to loosen the tension to an acceptable level we then noticed the rear axle measurement were two different values by a factor of 1 on the square metal (adjustment) plate. The left side was at 3, the right was at 2. Ray then measured the length from center of rear axle to... the engine... shaft(?) sorry I don't know the name of it. Anyway the odd thing is that the measurement was opposite of what you would expect. The measurement was longer on the 2 side than the 3 side by about 4mm if I recall correctly. I tagged Ray here who will post some photos so you can see what I'm talking about. I'm sure I mangled the description of what I'm talking about pretty good so those will help.

In the end we decided to trust the factory until further notice and adjusted the rear axle so that it was even on both sides.

Have you noticed anything that seems off with the belt tension or position of the rear axle?

Apologies for not knowing the proper name for things.
 

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Guessing you meant the swingarm pivot if both sides were checked for distance, and not the forward belt sprocket (one side).

Don't know the Bobber, although likely same as any Scout. My Scout has the measuring plate markings off by more than 1. Don't recall which was the shorter/longer side. Definitely not the way to adjust the rear axle anyhow.

I went so far as to put a levelling laser on the lower part of the rear tire, back to front, and try to measure alignment going past the front tire.
With belt tension and tracking on rear sprocket as good as I could get it, the alignment seemed good.
 

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Never trust the markings on the swingarm-on any belt or chain drive bike.

Short of the old methods we used to guarantee alignment, measure the amount of the exposed adjuster-that will get you close as need be.

The Scout is not so sensitive steering-wise to the alignment, but you don't want the belt riding too hard on one side of the pulley or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Never trust the markings on the swingarm-on any belt or chain drive bike.

Short of the old methods we used to guarantee alignment, measure the amount of the exposed adjuster-that will get you close as need be.The Scout is not so sensitive steering-wise to the alignment, but you don't want the belt riding too hard on one side of the pulley or the other.
The "exposed adjuster" is that plate with the markings?
 

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The "exposed adjuster" is that plate with the markings?
Answering for AAD. The adjuster bolt/nut combo and length of each extending beyond swingarm ends.

I counted visible threads on mine back when I first did the alignment/adjustment and they were something like 13 on one and 14 on the other. So not exact either, in my case anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Answering for AAD. The adjuster bolt/nut combo and length of each extending beyond swingarm ends. I counted visible threads on mine back when I first did the alignment/adjustment and they were something like 13 on one and 14 on the other. So not exact either, in my case anyway.
Ok thanks. I know the bolt/nut you are referring to.
 

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I made a tool out of a carpenters compass that I use on all rides.If you measure from the axle center to the swing arm bolt and even it out,you should be good.
 

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Using the adjuster length, I started by measuring the 2 adjusters separately and found on our 2 Scouts that they were very close.

I also checked pivot to swingarm length. Close enough.

So I use a screwdriver as a gauge, and measure the exposed part by feel-then test both the belt tracking then how the bike feels. Works pretty well these 45 years. But a 1 thread difference wouldn't do much harm on a Scout anyway.
 

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Honestly just follow the steps in the FSM for belt alignment, it's very simple.. Most important is that the belt tension is done when the bike has cooled down and that it doesn't ride up against either side of the drive sprocket (ideally it should be in the middle or as close to the middle as possible when spinning the rear tire forward or backward by hand; you should be able to visibly see the sprocket teeth on both sides) Furthermore, left side adjuster is for setting the tension, right side adjuster is for setting the "centered" alignment of the drive belt. Those "marks" on the axle nut are for initial reference and basically have no real use.. It even states so in the FSM
 
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