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Discussion Starter #1
My dealer told me it would be good to use a battery tender during long periods of not riding the bike. I have never had issues on my other two bikes. Normally I just add fuel stabilizer during long weeks of not riding in the winter.
Does anybody use tenders and what model? Are they really extending your battery life? I normally replace them every 2 years anyway.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Absolutely!! I have used them for years on both my bikes and the result is the battery has lasted much longer. I got 9 years out of the battery on my Virago when the best I could achieve was around 3 previously. So for the small amount of money they cost I say for sure!!
Keep the Shiny Side Up!!

Cheers,
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I have always used them on all my vehicles if they are going to sit a bit. I had a Battery Tender Jr and it worked well for years, but when it burned out I ended up with the Schumacher XM1-5. I also own another one made by the same company that will charge in several different modes. I have really enjoyed both of them. I have never needed to buy a motorcycle battery.

After coming back to a dead battery in a vehicle after a long vacation I also use a solar panel charger when the vehicle is left in a place like an airport lot. They work great.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
With a battery tender you should get at least 4-5 years out of a battery, and probably more, no need to replace every 2 years. I would imagine that if you are repalcing your battery every 2 years you would not need one but if you want to go<em> another</em> 2-4 years without replacing they are worth the money.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
I feel so bad for you southern boys that have those long weeks of winter. Try living in the frozen north like MN where we have bad riding for months. You will realy know what PMS stands for. Ya I uses a tender on all of the bikes.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I had never used a tender either, and I had got 8 years out of my last HD battery. The dealership did install a connector for one on the new bike, and they strongly advised using it.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
On my 08 Kingpin I never used anything for 4 years then battery went dead replaced with new interstate one lasted not even a year, dealer replaced said he never seen a battery so low, again same thing dead with second one, these where those gel type batteries, no good in my oponion. Got another new one this spring the one you put acid in same type it came with new no problem so far.
Regards
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Is there any concern with having the battery on a tender in the bike under a cover? I've always taken the battery out of the bike during the winter but am considering leaving it in the bike this year.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Got my first battery in 05

I had a new Kawaski vn 2000

Changed battery after 8 yrs, just didnt want to get stuck side the road

I still use that battery on the bench for testing

Do they work , for my money they do
 
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Discussion Starter #14
On my vision i use the socket in the trunk works fine

Make sure that the socket is live with key off
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I always pull my battery from my bike and store it inside because of weeks like this where the temp never gets above single digits. Traditionally I charge the battery for 1-2 days with this http://batterytender.com/battery-tender-plus-12v-at-1-25a.html (found for much less if you shop around) once every couple of months.

I'm curious, am I making things more difficult on myself than need be? My concern is leaving the battery hooked up to my bike in an unheated garage while connected to my tender. Sure the website provided states that the tender will adjust for ambient temperature, but the temp in my garage gets down to well below zero degrees F.

Will those extreme temps damage my battery, or would I be okay because it would be connected to my tender? What if the power went out for a day or two and the tender wasn't charging the battery - what would happen to the battery just sitting there in those extreme temps?
 
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Discussion Starter #16
A few years ago I would do like KNOWN1 & removed the battery for inside storage. Later I found I was doing a lot of unecessary work. Battery manufactureres will tell you to fully charge the battery & then disconnect it for storage. Only a battery with a low charge will freeze.

When I bought my new Native American Vintage, the dealer talked me into buying a battery tender that is also supposed to de-sulphate a battery or help bring an old battery back to life. I have used battery tenders on all of my stored vehicles for several years & am confident they pay off. I dont know if this new fangled one is worth it or not but it was only about $20 more so I figured it wasnt much of a gamble
 
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Discussion Starter #17
When I was living on the prairies where winter temperatures get to minus 30 so, those of us driving in those conditions learn to look after things or end up walking. My bike was left outside in an unheated garden shed. Along with gas line antifreeze, stabil, fogging, etc, I removed and put the battery in the basement off of the floor (important). A so-so battery will be fine at a few degrees below freezing while even a good one will deteriorate faster as the temperature goes down. I'm in Victoria now where riding is year round but I hate the constant rain so the bike still gets to rest for a couple of months.
I charged the battery a couple of times over the winter and in the spring on a full size charger with a built-in regulator (Craftsman 6 amp) and never had a problem with a short life other than with the cheap original batteries that vehicle manufacturers use. Batteries discharge naturally so yes, a bit of routine maintenance even when it's not in use will help. Southern riders whose winters last a month, if at all, may not have to pay any special attention. When the battery is moved in and out of the bike inspect it for corrosion and clean it if necessary. In the spring protect the posts with dielectic grease or a sealing spray. Also, short trips during the riding year are a major contributor to battery failure so that needs to be monitored as well.
One thing to keep in mind is that with batteries it is very much 'you get what you pay for'. Look at the cranking amps. If you are going to go with $40 batteries from China don't expect them to last as long as the more advanced ones. If your batteries are made in North America don't get picky on the brand because most come from one manufacturer anyway.

PS. When charging your battery in the bike at more than a trickle charge, if it's not a maintenance free battery, keep the bike uncovered to keep the vented gases from accumulating.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
I'm using the 4 place genius tender with cold mode for the wifes shadow, my lawn tractor battery, the xc, and my diesel tractor. I too used to pull my battery every winter, as it got so cold in the shed, but after doing it once on the vic, that was enough. Last year a new battery for the shadow 750 spirit ( special size, real tight fit) ran 140 bucks, so the noco genius should pay for itself...
 
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Discussion Starter #19
On older bikes, where the motor is as basic as it gets, with no alarm system and a carb (or more), taking the battery out or simply removing the neg cable will do for long storage. On these new technological wonders, the EFI, alarm and RFID systems are constant drags on the battery. So for even just a week of sitting the battery tender is going to prolong the life of your battery.
On another side of it, installing the tender's pigtail also offers you another power port option. On ours, we have the heated glove power cable plugged into it. (I did have to replace the fuse of course.)
EASY
 
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Discussion Starter #20
17650 said:
With a battery tender you should get at least 4-5 years out of a battery, and probably more, no need to replace every 2 years. I would imagine that if you are repalcing your battery every 2 years you would not need one but if you want to go<em> another</em> 2-4 years without replacing they are worth the money.
Same for me. 2+ years battery life without ever charging! then one time my EFI Fatboy died after 6 weeks in a hard winter, so I have used trickle chargers ever since.

I sold the 2005 Fatboy, with the original battery, in 2010, and have just replaced the Visions mid 2009 battery a few weeks ago.

These chargers go on sale for &$20 every so often, and I have received numerous (3?) as bonuses for buying tires or helmets on sale.

Since the plugs are all the same, and they generally come with terminal and Gator clamp plugs, I carry a gator clamp end to use my bike to jump others.

This is fortunate, since when my battery died on the Vision, I just borrowed an emergency battery from a guy at a car show and used the Clamps to jump MY bike.

Apparently, using a 4.5 + yo battery to make 6 weeks worth of short rides, with all the gadgets ( HID, heated grips& seats, phone charger, high beam) running,and a shorted WOLO horn, WITHOUT using a trickle charger will kill a battery!! Who knew?

Btw, have fun taking the Vision Battery out for arctic circle storage! Someone dropped the ball on that placement. Mine stays in and gets connected when the leaves turn from now on.

Kg
 
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