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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, finally got some time to tear into the clutch on my 116 Dark Horse. Since upgrading the power on this bike it has been able to out pull the clutch even with the Indian upgraded springs and a good condition stock clutch pack. This has mostly been noticeable in 5th and 6th gear wide open throttle, I have to back off the throttle to keep her from slipping too much. Barnett racing clutch to the rescue!

Step one: externals - pull floorboard and shift linkage as well as clutch cable, put drain pan under cover and pull cover.
Auto part Engine Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive engine part

Here you can see the clutch basket, primary and secondary drive gears, torque compensator.
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From this side you can see that pesky plastic oil pump drive gear. Mine seemed to be very loose fitting, but seems to be designed that way.
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I was expecting to see a lot cleaner internals on a bike with only 3800 miles, but I don't have any comparisons with others. Maybe the slipping clutch has contributed to a little extra debris in the oil.
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Here is the clutch basket with springs and plates removed... all looks in perfect condition.
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NEXT installment - parts comparisons and reassembly
 

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much appreciated thread. Love to see the internal on our bikes....keep up the good work :)
 

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Agree - Much appreciated. Thanks for the pics.
 

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Good timing... Appreciate the write up and pictures. I'll be tackling this project in the very near future.

Any chance you could list out your steps, such as what to loosen/take off in which order? Wouldn't want to do something out of sequence or forget to put something back on. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will write up overall detail, and could go back and insert small obvious stuff. Thing is, the things you can see do not present a problem for most folks. What is hidden or unclear, those might be a bit more tricky and I'll be sure to cover them more carefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Indian workshop manual will also be a good reference because it has sequential actions listed and torque specs, warnings, and so on. This job on a very low mileage upgrade will be somewhat different (easier) than a high-mileage repair. These parts can have high amounts of wear and tear over their lifespan and must be inspected and fitted very carefully to ensure longevity and proper performance. If you are not mechanically skilled and experienced, it would be best to have skilled help on this type of job. I will illustrate with the next installment.
 

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Well, finally got some time to tear into the clutch on my 116 Dark Horse. Since upgrading the power on this bike it has been able to out pull the clutch even with the Indian upgraded springs and a good condition stock clutch pack. This has mostly been noticeable in 5th and 6th gear wide open throttle, I have to back off the throttle to keep her from slipping too much. Barnett racing clutch to the rescue!

Step one: externals - pull floorboard and shift linkage as well as clutch cable, put drain pan under cover and pull cover.
View attachment 418440
Here you can see the clutch basket, primary and secondary drive gears, torque compensator.
View attachment 418442
From this side you can see that pesky plastic oil pump drive gear. Mine seemed to be very loose fitting, but seems to be designed that way.
View attachment 418444
I was expecting to see a lot cleaner internals on a bike with only 3800 miles, but I don't have any comparisons with others. Maybe the slipping clutch has contributed to a little extra debris in the oil.
View attachment 418446
Here is the clutch basket with springs and plates removed... all looks in perfect condition.
View attachment 418448

NEXT installment - parts comparisons and reassembly
Thanks for the post and pics! I have a 116 as well and it over powers the clutch in the higher gears even when adjusted properly. I have the Barnett kit as well and will either have the dealer do it when they do the new pistons and rods or now that I’ve seen it isn’t too bad I may tackle it my self.
 

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The Indian workshop manual will also be a good reference because it has sequential actions listed and torque specs, warnings, and so on. This job on a very low mileage upgrade will be somewhat different (easier) than a high-mileage repair. These parts can have high amounts of wear and tear over their lifespan and must be inspected and fitted very carefully to ensure longevity and proper performance. If you are not mechanically skilled and experienced, it would be best to have skilled help on this type of job. I will illustrate with the next installment.
Wow great pictures Diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Sequential dismantle for clutch service/replacement:

Clean your bike first... much easier and safer to work on a perfectly clean engine
Place bike upright in wheel dock or equivalent
Drain engine oil
Remove LH floorboard and shift linkage assembly from frame and from gear selector shaft
Remove clutch arm (end of clutch cable at engine case primary housing)
Remove clutch cable snap ring (at engine primary housing)
Remove clutch cable from engine primary cover housing
Remove 14 bolts from perimeter of primary cover
tap primary housing with soft mallet to loosen cover
pull primary cover straight out evenly from engine and set aside

At this point you will be able to see all your clutch internals as pictured above.
 

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Use Blue Loctite on the spring retainer bolts and never seize on the primary cover bolts, if the clutch cable had never been lubed this is a good time to do just that.

RACNRAY

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Thanks for the post and pics! I have a 116 as well and it over powers the clutch in the higher gears even when adjusted properly. I have the Barnett kit as well and will either have the dealer do it when they do the new pistons and rods or now that I’ve seen it isn’t too bad I may tackle it my self.
I was pretty sure I could not be the only early 116 adopter to fall into this clutch deficiency. I previously posted a teaser to see if anyone would respond and that post seems to have simply "disappeared". I do not always run this bike flat-out to overstress the stock clutch, and I don't use her for drag racing, but when I wants her to go, I don't want any weak or marginal components stopping the show! The stock Polaris clutch (even with the 116 kit springs) slips under that much horsepower and it will self-destruct if pushed hard enough. My friction plates all were perfect, but the steel plates were already showing signs of wear from slippage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
OK, time for next step of the install:

Food

This is the Barnett kit in totality, it has 7 steel plates (on right), 8 friction plates (on left), and 5 replacement pressure plate springs to apply sufficient compression to the pack. This is 1 extra steel and 1 extra friction plate over the stock setup and also stronger springs for a lot more holding power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Next take note that one of the friction plates is narrow compared to the others. This one must be placed fully inboard in your clutch basket. This is the one that goes against the judder spring and first steel judder seat plate. You retain these pieces in the clutch basket from the original clutch. Another note here is that the original separator plates are of two types, Barnett only one. The original friction plates are of 3 types, Barnett only two. With the Barnett kit you only have to get the judder friction plate in the fully inboard spot, all the others stack alternating friction/separator/friction and so on. In this photo, the judder friction plate above, and regular plate below, Barnett on left and original on right.
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Stock clutch springs spec out at 73PSI @ their 1.200" installed height, the Barnett's spec out at 79 PSI at the same 1.200". NOT a big increase, only bout an 8% difference.

Barnett sent me some stiffer springs which are monsters, 92PSI @ same 1.200"!!!

The extra plate kit offers more surface area, and that's a good thing.

RACNRAY

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Stock clutch springs spec out at 73PSI @ their 1.200" installed height, the Barnett's spec out at 79 PSI at the same 1.200". NOT a big increase, only bout an 8% difference.

Barnett sent me some stiffer springs which are monsters, 92PSI @ same 1.200"!!!

The extra plate kit offers more surface area, and that's a good thing.

RACNRAY
Any specs on the 116 kit springs?
Any feedback regarding just how stiff the clutch feel was with the 92psi springs?
 

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IF someone had one to send I'll spec it and post the results.

RACNRAY
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
IF someone had one to send I'll spec it and post the results.

RACNRAY
I can send you one. Barnett could not tell me if their kit springs were any stiffer than the Indian available parts. I do not think the extra clutch friction surface area alone will cure our problem... It will take some strong springs.
 

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What are you going to do about sealing the primary cover again ... new original Indian primary cover gasket or some work around?

(unfortunately the Barnett kit does not come with a new gasket)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Very good point. There are 3 seals involved, two shaft seals for clutch and shift shafts, and the gasket on the primary cover.

Order 2x 3610154 shaft seal ($8.50 each)
Order 1x 5813897 primary cover gasket ($40)

There is also a bearing for the clutch rack, a bearing for the assembly carrier, a stake nut that must be replaced if you pull your clutch basket off the clutch shaft.

This is all covered in the workshop manual, but mainly more involved with replacement of high-mileage worn out assemblies than a simple upgrade to an undamaged unit. Even your shift linkages and clutch cable should be carefully inspected for signs of wear or damage if your bike has a lot of mileage and wear.
 
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