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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure, but does ethanol blended fuel make your bike run hotter ? And if you can't run any other type of fuel, do you add octane booster even though your already running the 91 octane ?
 

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Ethanol on Two Wheels | RFA: Renewable Fuels Association Is one view of ethanol fuels being used in motorcycles. It is pro ethanol but notes significant engine modifications may be advisable for regular use of ethanol based gasoline. I also have not seen any long term data of bikes ridden more than 40k miles on ethanol added fuels vs. unleaded regular. If anyone has seen, please comment.

There are a number of information sites about the potential for problems if ethanol based additives or ethanol is added to a motorcycles gasoline.
Regular Gasoline vs. Ethanol Gas for Motorcycles is one link.

The 2015 Indian Scout manual says gasoline containing up to 15% ethanol can be used.

Having had resins in tanks, rubber components, and engine gaskets dissolve after using ethanol fuels in lawn and snow equipment and having to replace fuel injectors in a 1998 Chevy at 45,000 miles after the introduction of ethanol 10% gasoline, I like many others, do not wish to run a motorcycle on ethanol based fuels until more data is available regarding potential damage or benefits for doing so.

Living in a tri-county area where ethanol fuel is mandated, I would be interested in any information as to which brands and grades of higher octane fuel might have better additives to cope with ethanol. Alternatively, what are peoples experiences with non-alcohol based fuel additives.

Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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FWIW, I have run my Venture for 40K plus miles on regular 10% ethanol. No gunk in carbs or other badness to report.
What year was the venture? I understand Chevy made significant modifications in more recent years to prevent the types of problems I had with the 1998 model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea , I saw the manual says it's okay, it just seems it makes for problems, and some of the stuff I read, the science on the amount added, can really vary from pump to pump, due to fuel separation, some times at a pump stating 10% it maybe as low as 4% or as high as 15%. scary stuff. So if it says 15%, then what, as high as 22% ? Yikes !
 

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I have run ethanol for so many years and have experience only one problem because it was "methanol" in the gas. That was in 1982. I have never had a problem and wouldn't be afraid of running it now. The 91 I get for mine doesn't have ethanol, but it just wouldn't bother me.
 

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The above information is spot on. I am a small engine mechanic and deal with customers that purchase the cheapest fuel they can get. Here is the point...We own 20k+ motorcycles, so trying to save a couple of dollars on a tank of fuel is, to say the least counterproductive. If you can obtain 100% fuel...do so. If not there are many fuel additives on the market, (do your research) that can be helpful. Ethanol used in air cooled engines is NOT a good idea...it is however good for business if you are a mechanic...'nuff said?
 

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It seems like more often there are no local ethanol free gas pumps when people check, on the forums. I had one near me in the east valley in Phoenix, but it is a truck stop near a race track on I-10 and it is race fuel that is almost $8 per gallon. Other than that, there are no ethanol free places nearby. I have used Lucas oil's ethanol treatment and I am thinking to try a new one soon. I don't remember the name of it, but it "seems" good. I will do my research and report findings soon.


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The above information is spot on. I am a small engine mechanic and deal with customers that purchase the cheapest fuel they can get. Here is the point...We own 20k+ motorcycles, so trying to save a couple of dollars on a tank of fuel is, to say the least counterproductive. If you can obtain 100% fuel...do so. If not there are many fuel additives on the market, (do your research) that can be helpful. Ethanol used in air cooled engines is NOT a good idea...it is however good for business if you are a mechanic...'nuff said?
but they do not make premium regular gas - and my engine specifies premium - now what?
 

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Get the regular non ethanol gas and add octane booster.
All you can find in most of Texas is the "Iowa Welfare Gas." It plays Hell with my Vespas. It seem like I am replacing the fuel lines constantly and they can't sit more than a few days without crap in the carbs.I put Seafoam in every tank to keep them running.
 

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Unless you're getting fuel from a "three hose" pump you should always use octane booster. Most pumps today are single hose; meaning all three grades are dispensed through the same hose. Why is this important? Most people buy the lowest octane fuel for their cars, pick-ups, etc. Odds are, you'll pull in after someone has pumped low octane fuel; you'll select 91 or 93 octane but guess what - the first gallon to gallon and a half that you pump will be the fuel that is left in the hose from the guy before you. When you're pumping 15 to 20 gallons in a car it's no big deal but when you're getting 3 or 4 gallons it's huge! I try and find octane booster with an ethanol treatment but it's not always available. My buddy and I both have RM's that are the same age (within two weeks), we ride a lot together so we're filling up at the same stations, riding the same speeds, same terrain, etc. I use octane booster he doesn't and I'm getting 2 more MPG and my motor seems to run cooler. I'm a believer!
 

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...the first gallon to gallon and a half that you pump will be the fuel that is left in the hose from the guy before you. ...
I believe this to be a little high.
I have been looking around the inter-web and the general consensus seems top be 10 oz give or take.

although too little octane results in pinging, another concern is that much octane does your engine (and pocketbook) a disservice

I would be more concerned about avoiding ethanol blends when ever possible.
 

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I believe this to be a little high.
I have been looking around the inter-web and the general consensus seems top be 10 oz give or take.

although too little octane results in pinging, another concern is that much octane does your engine (and pocketbook) a disservice

I would be more concerned about avoiding ethanol blends when ever possible.
Wow, I didn't know this was such a problem.
In Phoenix there is only a couple of places listed.
I alway use chevron.. And the V&H fuel pack riches the mix quite a bit from the factory setting.
 

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For what it's worth, Here in MN, the majority of pumps are 10% Corn gas. Occasionally, and further out of the cities, you can find non-oxygenated(code word for corn gas) premium (91).

I have Victory bikes that have well over 50K and have many friends with bikes that have a lot of miles (over 100K) all using the corn gas. There has never been any fuel related issues with any of these bikes. Some of the guys even use the 87, and still don't have problems. The only thing we all do is use a fuel stabilizer when the bikes are put away for the winter. And, keep up with the fuel filter maintenance intervals. Very important stuff.

And yes, all of my bikes get better mileage running the premium non-corn. Doesn't run any cooler that I can tell (and a temp dipstick doesn't help much) but gets more MPG.
 
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