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So after working so much, im finally able to take a drive, yes a drive, to the nearest Indian dealership I was near to see the new challenger. I must say after all the hype about this bike I didnt find it appealing at all! Now I didnt get a chance to ride it because after I sat on it and started it up I wasnt feeling it. But the best thing about this bike it the front fairing. But I do NOT like that the paint doesnt surround the display/gauges. The tank just seems big and bulky to me. My biggest gripe about the bike is the fact that the guy said no matter what exaust system you put on it, it wont sound like my chieftain. A BIG let down because I love the rumble mine has and so far im like the only indian guy in my group, let alone city. Now the paint is great. I love the color, i love how the engine looks. Now maybe 2021 when they change the look of it I will trade mine in but right now, I dont see a need to. But thats just me and I was wondering am I alone because Ive seen nothing but great reviews of how people love the bike...
I agree and disagree. I think that the Challenger is as ugly as a bag full of moldy corn filled crap and that stupid fairing looks like a cancerous boil. Add in the Harley Davidson saddlebags and you have the most backwards look that could be cooked up by a bunch of crack addicts that are freebasing meth and crank. Other than that, it is an awesome bike
 

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I’m another one of those guys that was turned off by the fairing. On my RM, the road is “right there.” On the Challenger, there’s this massive console between me and the road. I’ll keep my RM.
Agreed, it’s a great bike but the fairing is a nonstarter for me as well.
Maybe I’m not a fixed fairing guy. But build a stripped down hot rod version and there may be another Indian in the garage.
 

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I would almost be certain Indian will have other versions of the Powerplus engine & chassis found in the Challenger. I can imagine the economic slowdown etc. caused by the pandemic probably had an impact on how soon these new models will be introduced. Give it time and they will have them.
 

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Someone else also mentioned new models but who among us really knows? I love my Spingfield and wouldn't trade it in forbrhe same thing but with a different engine, so it would need to be completely different.
 

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I would almost be certain Indian will have other versions of the Powerplus engine & chassis found in the Challenger. I can imagine the economic slowdown etc. caused by the pandemic probably had an impact on how soon these new models will be introduced. Give it time and they will have them.
I have no doubt that you are correct. A larger more contemporary version of the Scout would appeal to me. No bags, no fairing and I’d have no need for a windshield.
 

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I would really like to see a “Springfield” version of the Challenger. I’m not a fan of big fairings, and I don’t need radios, big screen TVs, etc. on a motorcycle.
 

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Lets remember the Challenger was designed to go after the HD touring/bagger market. If you are a rider that liked and/or owned their Street Glides, Road Glides, Electra Glide, etc than you would probably look at the Challenger, the Chieftain, and/or the Roadmaster as an alternative when purchasing a new bike. Those bikes comes very close to overall design and function. Indian just happens to offer a slightly better performing bike at the moment with the Challenger. It's hot now but who know where it will be a few years from now. After the King of Baggers race, I'm sure both manufacturers are putting a lot more R&D dollars into this new "performance bagger" category/market. I traded in my HD Street Glide with Stage 2 cams, full exhaust, cat delete, air intake, tuner, etc for the Challenger just one year later after noticing it had more power and handled better than my heavily modded bike. That was my reason.. I know there are many people that can't stand the look of the Street Glide or Road Glide, (wife is not crazy about it either) so they are not fans of the Challenger either. It's a specific model for a specific target market.

For general day to day local riding, I still prefer my HD breakout. (but secretly looking at replacing it with the Indian Scout! 😎 )
 

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I have no doubt that you are correct. A larger more contemporary version of the Scout would appeal to me. No bags, no fairing and I’d have no need for a windshield.
They need one the size of a regular cruiser... take a look at the scout compared to my gunner
20170326_193409.jpg
 

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I want the exact Challenger RSD built for the King of the Baggers Race. I don't need all the electronics in the front fairing. But the fairing design doesn't really bother me.
 

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I have been pulling for the so called "tweener" bike for several years. Something around 1400 to 1500cc (85 to 90 cubic inches) with the weight, wheelbase and other dimensions right smack in the middle between the Scouts and the big Indians. Maybe 675 to 700 pounds or so, easier to back and maneuver at slow speed but with better long range comfort than the Scout.
 

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I tested both the Challenger and Chieftain models back to back, both impressive in different ways. The Challenger is superior in function at all levels it runs circles around the 111/116 models. Visually I find it a good looking motorcycle but some people feel the fairing is ugly and they need to review BMW’s collection of fairings past and present before passing judgement. As far as saddlebags I like the flat top design better than the bubble top and I also find the Vintage leather bags more attractive than the bubble top, but none are offensive.

I chose the Chieftain because I like air cooled motorcycles more than liquid cooled, although my garage has a collection of both. Folks are like a jigsaw puzzle, each piece a little different but we all fit in somewhere.
 

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I tested both the Challenger and Chieftain models back to back, both impressive in different ways. The Challenger is superior in function at all levels it runs circles around the 111/116 models. Visually I find it a good looking motorcycle but some people feel the fairing is ugly and they need to review BMW’s collection of fairings past and present before passing judgement. As far as saddlebags I like the flat top design better than the bubble top and I also find the Vintage leather bags more attractive than the bubble top, but none are offensive.

I chose the Chieftain because I like air cooled motorcycles more than liquid cooled, although my garage has a collection of both. Folks are like a jigsaw puzzle, each piece a little different but we all fit in somewhere.
I agree that Polaris did wonders with the mechanical engineering of the Challenger and I am happy that it gets great reviews and seems to sell very well. It should be offered in a classic design as well. Those of us turned off by the looks see it as a Harley Davidson. Actually, many of us think it is downright hideous and the designers were a bunch of millennials that are freebasing meth and crack
 

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I passed on Challenger, I did not find it compelling enough to change bikes. I am hoping to see the PP motor in another bike with fairing sometime down the line. The advantages it had over my bike was better storage and built in navigation; something the 2021 version of my bike fixes; but I gave up too much and would have paid a lot more. It is a nice machine .
 

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I have a Chief DH 111 and a Challenger DH. First you have to ride it to truly know if it is/is not you. Of course it will not sound like the 111/116s cause the engine is different. However, it is a great ride. As most have said it is up to the rider, but I love the difference in each bike. Also, I have options when I ride too! I use my Chief DH for rides around town, I ride my challenger on long rides. I bought it in July this year and already have 5k miles, I also put 5k miles on my Chief DH this year. I will say that I ride in the rain a lot and the Challenger has saved me, I do not have a windshield on my Chief. Both bikes get up and go when you twist the throttle. I was skeptical too at first, but after seeing all the reviews I could not wait. I also bought mine without ever riding it and I am not disappointed, not one bit.
 

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I have not ridden one so my opinion is only on looks and I don't like it. Looks too much like a HD for my liking.
 
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So after working so much, im finally able to take a drive, yes a drive, to the nearest Indian dealership I was near to see the new challenger. I must say after all the hype about this bike I didnt find it appealing at all! Now I didnt get a chance to ride it because after I sat on it and started it up I wasnt feeling it. But the best thing about this bike it the front fairing. But I do NOT like that the paint doesnt surround the display/gauges. The tank just seems big and bulky to me. My biggest gripe about the bike is the fact that the guy said no matter what exaust system you put on it, it wont sound like my chieftain. A BIG let down because I love the rumble mine has and so far im like the only indian guy in my group, let alone city. Now the paint is great. I love the color, i love how the engine looks. Now maybe 2021 when they change the look of it I will trade mine in but right now, I dont see a need to. But thats just me and I was wondering am I alone because Ive seen nothing but great reviews of how people love the bike...
Yes you are the only one ;)
 

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It really doesn't matter what any individual thinks, because sales will be the determinant of how the public receives the bike. Personally, the obsession with ride command seems more important than the real qualities that make up the experience of riding.
Frank Lloyd Wright said, "form follows function," so it's been my experience that the fairing delivers a seamlessly smooth ride in all wind and traffic conditions while offering the option of controlling air flow to the rider via the opening vent doors and electric windscreen.
Handling, comfort, fuel economy and available pertinent information make for a perfect riding experience.
Reading the complaints pointed out that a lot of the respondents hadn't ridden the bike or were upset by something a salesperson told them, which wasn't correct. I've had mine for 1 year and still look forward to taking it out.
The Challenger is a specific bike for a category that it dominates, yet suffers from the Goldilocks syndrome , where it's too big, too soft, too expensive, etc.
 
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