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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I think I found a place to get these long tube trumpet horns mounted out of the way of the fender, where they won't be hit by suspension travel in any direction of the front fender being turned. Since the last horn I had in the stock location of the frame just in front of the motor the pump stuck out too far and dented the fender. I shook and rocked this thing as hard as I could in the garage, and I couldn't make them touch the fender. So with the first air horn and pump I used (It was one of the Stebel units which has really great high pitched sound), I just spliced in to the existing horn wires for quick gratification as I was going to wire up the relay and get everything going right. Or that's how I thought it would be on paper anyways. I could activate the horn with a press of the horn button. It would toot for a second or whatever. But if I hold it like 2 seconds in to the honk, the system would cut it off and say it had too high of a horn current detected. Just shutting off the motorcycle with the power ignition button and coming back on and starting it again would clear the code, and at least the horn would work for a quick toot or two not holding for a sustained honk. And the horns quick toot when activating the lock button on the key fob twice, too.

Today I got the replacement horns, and got the relay wired in according to the instructions. When the pump is hooked up to the relay, and I splice the stock horn switch power wire to the relay, I get an error code pop up for too low of current. The pump does not activate. I am pretty sure I have the relay connected properly according to the directions. I went from my fuse block for power and ground. I'd assume that if the relay was not properly connected it shouldn't show any codes? I have heard the electrical systems on these bikes can be fickle.

However, if I just use the stock horn wires, with no relay then I get too high of a current detected on the horn circuit and the horn cuts off after 2 seconds honk as described above. But at least it will work, and the horns will honk. They are quite loud, and I think I like the direction they point to hopefully help keep debris out of the bells and inside, and the sound on the road next to any too close of a vehicle hopefully will be enough. But maybe the only practical direction to mount them so there are no more fender dents.

As far as the location of the compressor for these horns, I think I will use a large enough hose clamp, and clamp it to the frame just next to the leg fairing on the left side. I was thinking about laying it down on top of the small radiator in between the frame, but I don't think there are any good mounting points to get any zip ties or hose clamps on to. It would be convenient for hose length to the horns but I think there is enough that came with it to run to both with not needing any extra.

Here is a picture of how I want to mount them. How do I overcome the horn errors, because traffic around here really requires more than a toot or 1.5 or 2 seconds of horn to let someone know they just screwed up. But inside the crude red mouse drawn circle is the dent caused by the other horn pump that was sticking out just a little too far.

598474
 

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I'm guessing that when you wired the relay into the horn wires you took the horn out of action. If so, try it with the horn wired in place as normal and the wires to the relay in parallel. You will get the beep with the honk, but the air horn will win.

The computer is checking that the horn is working by the amount of current it draws. The relay, however, is set up to draw as little current as possible on the primary circuit and the computer probably interprets it as an inoperative horn. It's the opposite if the computer sees the amount of current needed for the air pump and is protecting the bike from a burnt out circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here is a pic of the automobile door style projector light that will project a design on to the ground when you open the door. Since I like Transformers and it's the theme of the bike, I thought it would be appropriate. Going to see how they last on the rear saddle bag guard bars. Looks cool on the ground. Should be cool for night riding.

598500



I modified how it wanted me to wire it on the instructions. I have included a picture of the wiring diagram. On terminals 30 and 86, I pulled the short connecting wire on terminal 86 and plugged the stock horn power wire to terminal 86. Terminal 30 is still battery power from my fuse block. I can get 3 seconds before it detects a low draw. And I can tap the horn button in quick succession maybe I did 7 or 8 times before I just held it for 3 seconds until the error kicked in. I'm still not sure if this is how you meant to relay in parallel?

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So I think I found a place to get these long tube trumpet horns mounted out of the way of the fender, where they won't be hit by suspension travel in any direction of the front fender being turned. Since the last horn I had in the stock location of the frame just in front of the motor the pump stuck out too far and dented the fender. I shook and rocked this thing as hard as I could in the garage, and I couldn't make them touch the fender. So with the first air horn and pump I used (It was one of the Stebel units which has really great high pitched sound), I just spliced in to the existing horn wires for quick gratification as I was going to wire up the relay and get everything going right. Or that's how I thought it would be on paper anyways. I could activate the horn with a press of the horn button. It would toot for a second or whatever. But if I hold it like 2 seconds in to the honk, the system would cut it off and say it had too high of a horn current detected. Just shutting off the motorcycle with the power ignition button and coming back on and starting it again would clear the code, and at least the horn would work for a quick toot or two not holding for a sustained honk. And the horns quick toot when activating the lock button on the key fob twice, too.

Today I got the replacement horns, and got the relay wired in according to the instructions. When the pump is hooked up to the relay, and I splice the stock horn switch power wire to the relay, I get an error code pop up for too low of current. The pump does not activate. I am pretty sure I have the relay connected properly according to the directions. I went from my fuse block for power and ground. I'd assume that if the relay was not properly connected it shouldn't show any codes? I have heard the electrical systems on these bikes can be fickle.

However, if I just use the stock horn wires, with no relay then I get too high of a current detected on the horn circuit and the horn cuts off after 2 seconds honk as described above. But at least it will work, and the horns will honk. They are quite loud, and I think I like the direction they point to hopefully help keep debris out of the bells and inside, and the sound on the road next to any too close of a vehicle hopefully will be enough. But maybe the only practical direction to mount them so there are no more fender dents.

As far as the location of the compressor for these horns, I think I will use a large enough hose clamp, and clamp it to the frame just next to the leg fairing on the left side. I was thinking about laying it down on top of the small radiator in between the frame, but I don't think there are any good mounting points to get any zip ties or hose clamps on to. It would be convenient for hose length to the horns but I think there is enough that came with it to run to both with not needing any extra.

Here is a picture of how I want to mount them. How do I overcome the horn errors, because traffic around here really requires more than a toot or 1.5 or 2 seconds of horn to let someone know they just screwed up. But inside the crude red mouse drawn circle is the dent caused by the other horn pump that was sticking out just a little too far.

View attachment 598474

Indians use a CAN Bus electrical system where the VCM monitors electrical draw on the various circuits. If the draw is unacceptable to what the system expects, it will shut it down and throw codes. You can't just splice into the wring on these bikes like most. You have to get a specific CAN bus isolation device that allows you to add aftermarket electrical items without causing issues. Custom Dynamics sells them as well as others.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great link, thanks Baron. I think I've actually seen this before, but never needed it til now it appears. In my searchings for the next best lights, I know I have seen it. I have heard of the can bus system before and seen it mentioned around here on the boards. I'll look in to it and see what I can do!
 

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I'm still not sure if this is how you meant to relay in parallel?
The relay activates the compressor when the coils close. To wire them in parallel, you'd tap into the existing horn wiring while the existing horn is in place and use that to activate both the horn and the relay. In this case, you'd have 86 to one horn cable and 85 to the other. When the VCM watches the current draw, it'll see slightly more than normal since the coil draws a small amount. You'll end up with a different dual tone type of sound but it will bypass the error codes. The only other way to do it would be to pull more current with your relay. You could do it with some resistors, etc but your essentially wasting power at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yea I have heard that about resistors too. Thanks for your input Tech! I'll see what I can do. Just my luck when I mounted the relay, the mounting tab broke. But I think it will stay I managed to zip tie it so we will see.
 
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